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Lost Ancestors

Why I have been writing so much since 2009…

Our Ancestors

That could have been the title of this blog I created back in September 2009.

There are so many lost ancestors out there to be reunited with.

young-man-new-york

I have got little clues about this young man who might be related to Phoebe Alexandre.

Could he be her husband Charles Lestage?

Phoebe Alexandre

Phoebe was a lost ancestor back in 2010 on a picture of sisters taken in the late 1890s in Bristol, Connecticut.

Phoebe Alexandre and Myra Alexandre - sisters

Little by little lost ancestors came to life on Our Ancestors.

First with Myra Alexandre.

possible Malvina Lagasse late 1890's Bristol, Conn.

young Myra Alexandre daughter of Philomene Lagasse and Jean-Baptiste Alexandre

Myra married William Archambault.

Myra Alexandre and William Archambeault

Myra’s and William’s descendants connected and shared a lot since they had a lot to share.

My new found third cousin has very little to share about what she knows on her great-grandmother Phoebe Alexandre seen here from Joe’s collection.

Phoebe Alexandre

But that’s okay. People can’t share what they don’t have.

Maybe in five years from now someone related to Phoebe’s…

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More Memories of Mother

John’s mother

John's Storybook Volume One

Someone asked for photos so I immediately messaged my younger brother in Northern  Queensland to ask him if he could send a couple. He just as immediately unlocked the 753 safety deposit boxes of family memorabilia and sent me nine. “Is that enough?” he asked. Of course it was enough! I had only asked for two so I suppose I’d better post them all. A city girl who went bush and a bushie who came back to the city. Click one one and then click the arrow to see all at full size.

Notice she was always smiling!

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Unidentified People

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Senior Moments

Senior moments revisited

Our Ancestors

I did not know that expression until I visited Joe…

I had a lot of senior moments during my trip to Connecticut trying to remember some of the names while I was visiting cemeteries with Joe and Frank.

We visited St. Thomas and St. Joseph cemeteries if I remember the names correctly.

As usual I took a lot of pictures.

You never know when these will help in further research.

We started first at St. Thomas cemetery which I had visited last year.

Frank Archambeault was looking for some of his ancestors buried there, but he could not find any headstones that would lead him to them. I took this picture where some of his ancestors would be buried.

My great-grandfather Dennis Lagasse (1842-1927) and his father Stanislas Lagacé (1816-1900) have to be also buried at St. Joseph’s, but I only found two of Dennis Lagasse’s sons’ headstones:

Stanislas Lagassey……

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Agnes Lagaser – Wife of Leon Saucier – Redux

One for GP…

Our Ancestors

This is what started this neverending story.

I am reposting it because someone answered my call for the headstones she posted on Find A Grave.

Lisa took those pictures and she allowed me to post them on the blog.

Collection Lisa H.

She took those pictures in Mount Calvary Cemetery, a cemetery in New Hampshire.

Click here for a virtual visit.

These pictures were a great help in finding Irene’s ancestors and descendants.

Irene Wilcox

Collection Jason West

Irene was the daughter of Adélard or Théodore Turcotte who changed his name to Wilcox. I don’t know why Adélard Turcotte used that name since it does not sound a bit like Turcotte.

Maybe it does if you say Turcotte fast enough.

This being said, start reading the old post I wrote back in December when I first contacted Jason, and make sense of all this.

Original post

My blog is really like a…

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the French Connection – Part 8 – Trois Rivieres and Pierre Lefebvre

Rosh’s time travel – part 8

Lighten up, Brighten up

Trois-Rivieres c. 1700 by James Pichy Trois-Rivieres c. 1700 by James Pichy

How many dang parts am I going to have in this French connection? I’m not sure. I’ve just been going along to see where it leads me. Trois Rivieres is a very significant city for my ancestors. I remember receiving my first package from a Quebec researcher. I gave her $50 and she gave me my French-Canadian family tree back to the 1600s. I was blown away. I had never seen anything like it. There were so many ancestors found in one fell swoop.  That’s the beauty of Catholic church records. Anyway, one of the most mentioned places was Trois Rivieres. My great great grandmother’s maiden name was Lefebvre and her ancestor, Pierre Lefebvre was a founding settler of Trois Rivieres.

Trois Rivieres from the website of the Canadian Encyclopedia:

The regional capital of Quebec’s Mauricie region, is located on the west shore of…

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the French Connection – Part 7 – Acadian Ancestors

My friend Ron Depatie will love this reblogged post from Rosh.

Lighten up, Brighten up

The 1630s bring many new settlers from France to New France.

PORT ROYAL

From Wikipedia:

Port-Royal was the capital of Acadia from 1605 to 1710. Initially Port-Royal was located on the north shore of the Annapolis Basin in the present-day community of Port Royal (note the Anglophone spelling), which is the site of the replica reconstruction of the original Habitation at Port-Royal. After its destruction by raiders from Virginia in 1613, Port-Royal was re-established on the south bank of the river 8 km (5.0 mi) upstream. The British renamed Port-Royal at this new location as Annapolis Royal following their conquest of Acadia in 1710.

Port-Royal was founded by Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons and Samuel de Champlain in 1605. The settlement was the first permanent European settlement north of St. Augustine, Florida. (Two years later, the English made their first permanent settlement in Jamestown, Virginia.) Approximately seventy-five years after Port-Royal…

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the French Connection – Part 6 – the Percheron Immigration (and how I’m related to Angelina Jolie)

Part 6 of the French Connection

Lighten up, Brighten up

I’ve found a great website for French-Canadian ancestry called a Point in History.

It’s full of great information on early settlers of Quebec, so I’m going to use a lot of the information from this website in my post. Why re-invent the wheel? So here we go.

A brief chronology up to the Percheron Immigration

1608: Champlain sets up an “Habitation” at Quebec as well as alliances with the Algonquin, Huron (Wyandot), and Montagnais (Innu) tribes for control of the fur trade.

1611: A European colony is established by Champlain on the Island of Montréal (Ville Marie).

1617: Louis Hébertand his family settle at Quebec.

1627: Cardinal Richelieu creates theCompany of One Hundred Associates.

1628: In the spring, Robert Giffard of Normandy sails for New France with the first group of about 300 settlers along with supplies for the new settlement. The vessel…

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