Ron’s Labor Day

It’s Labor Day today. I hope you’re not working.

Ron’s search for who built la Maison Chaumont continues.

Ron Depatie thought Toussaint, the son  of his ancestor Jacques Bélisle, had built la Maison Chaumont.

My ancestor’s son built this…

Ron had written me a comment.

Hi from Ron Roture dit Belisle (known today as Ron Depatie)

This reply comes from reading an old blog I found on your site dated March 18, 2008 THE HOUSE OF CHAUMONT STE ANNE DES PLAINES.

Just wanted to let you know that there is an old family from Saint-Anne-des-Plaines coming out of the closet for the first time in over a hundred years today…

In this article you speak of Toussaint Belisle as being the local custom contractor to have built this house. I would just like to add, for any one who might be interested in knowing, that Toussaint Belisle an entrepreneur had three other brothers also, Léon, Élie, Frederick Belisle seen named as entrepreneurs in the area of Ste-Anne-des-Plaines and Montreal. They were the sons of Jacques Belisle and Elmere Therrien of Ste Anne’s. Leon Belisle also known as Leon Despatie was my great-grand-father.

Thru your blog that I just read today, I found out something I never knew and that was Toussaint was a home builder in Ste Anne’s and it would be neat to know if his brothers helped him on this one.

Well that’s all from me for now. I thank you for taking the time to read this and hope it gave some information that might be helpful to others.

Thank you.
Ronnie Roture dit Belisle dit Depatie

After searching and searching, Ron and I think that another Toussaint, the son of George Bélisle and Olivine Bélisle, was the builder. He built also this house on Third Avenue…

Ron is with his uncle Paul

However…

Ron has some expertise in old houses restoration and he noticed something quite interesting while examining la Maison Chaumont, the house on Third Avenue and also this one.


See you next Monday.

Ron’s back on track…

The Bélisle family of Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines is on the map as well as on the Internet, just as much as the Lagasse family is.

I don’t know where I am heading with this, but anyway… full speed ahead.

1939 Chevy

Three Toussaint Bélisle could have built la Maison Chaumont.

Click for a larger version…

Toussaint Bélisle the First was born on May 19, 1857 in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines. This Toussaint was the son of Joseph Bélisle and Josephte Chaumont. Josephte could also have Josette and even Christine as a given name.

This Toussaint married Vitaline Duquette in 1880. The name Toussaint Despaties was written in the marriage certificate. After Vitaline’s death, Toussaint married Alphonsine Lapointe in 1894. Toussaint Bélisle was written in marriage certificate. His mother’s name became Marie-Louise Chaumont…

In the 1891 Canadian census, we find that this Toussaint is a carpenter which should make him a serious candidate for the builder of Maison Chaumont.

Toussaint Bélisle the Second was born on October 30, 1858, also in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines. According to his marriage certificate he is the son of Georges Bélisle and Olivine Bélisle dit Goyet. Georges is a farmer in the 1881 Canadian census as well as his son Toussaint…

Toussaint Bélisle the Third was born on October 31, 1858, one day after Toussaint the Second. His parents are Jacques Bélisle and Elmire Therrien.

This is Ron’s lineage.

A working man, Ron Depatie dit Roture dit Bélisle dit Rotureau

Jacques Bélisle lives in le Trait-Carré according to the 1881 Canadian census. He is a laborer just like his son Toussaint.

Of our three Toussaint, only one seems, for the time being, to have the necessary skills to build the house  of Joseph Chaumont… except that… whether we are talking house building or genealogy, we should never that anything for granted.

We will try to get to the bottom of this on Labor Day.

Meet Ron Rotureau

I have met so many wonderful people since 2007.

I would like you to meet a very dear friend a mine…

Bert and Ernie…

His name is Ron Depatie.

I had never met the guy before last Saturday. We had only exchanged a lot of e-mails in the last two weeks or so.

If you are confused about all this, then you have to read the first articles where I introduced Ron Depatie to the cyberworld.

Click here for the first article.

Click here for the second article.

This is a picture of Ron Depatie.

He sent it to me two weeks ago.

Have bulldozer, will travel…

Ron Depatie seemed to be a very nice guy at the time, and I never argue with a guy driving a bulldozer.

Ron moves earth around for a business.

However I think this guy has been also digging a lot to find his own roots just like I did back in 2007.

Ron has been at it since 2003.

You see Ron had found out that his ancestors had lived in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines back in the 1880s precisely when this house was built and still exists now.

Maison Chaumont built in 1884

Ron Depatie had written to me because he thought that one of his ancestors had built the Chaumont house. Mind you Ron does not brag about it. It only makes him proud.

So what’s that all about?

At first, Ron and I thought there were only two Toussaints in the picture…

Dead wrong!

There’s a third one and this one is probably the real builder of the house.

Well sort of because all of this is just presumption as they say in genealogy, and also is a question of terminology.

See you next Wednesday with…

Will the real Toussaint Bélisle finally stand up?

Meantime, if you need some little landscaping done around the house, here’s Ron’s business card.

La crème de la crème… in landscaping

Just say Pierre Lagacé sent you.

Now if you are asking yourself… Why is he calling that guy Ron Rotureau?

That’s a good question… and you’ll get the answer along the way.

The Chaumont house… Final answer…?

You have to read this article first to understand what’s going on, then you can go ahead with your reading.

Toussaint Bélisle built that house in 1884.

la Maison Chaumont 1884

Final answer?

Not so fast…

Toussaint Bélisle did indeed built la Maison Chaumont.

The proof is the pudding…

Click on the pudding

The problem is that you have three Toussaint Bélisle living in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines in those days.

One was born in May 1857 and two in October 1858.

One Toussaint was born on Halloween’s Day and the other one the day before.

Why am I telling all this?

One of the relatives of one of those Toussaint Bélisle wrote me a comment on the French version of this blog.

This is what he wrote…

Hi from Ron Roture dit Belisle (known today as Ron Depatie)

This reply comes from reading an old blog I found on your site dated March 18, 2008 THE HOUSE OF CHAUMONT STE- ANNE-DES-PLAINES.

Just wanted to let you know that there is an old family from Saint-Anne-des-Plaines coming out of the closet for the first time in over a hundred years today…

In this article you speak of Toussaint Belisle as being the local custom contractor to have built this house. I would just like to add, for any one who might be interested in knowing, that Toussaint Belisle an entrepreneur had three other brothers also, Léon, Élie, Frederick Belisle seen named as entrepreneurs in the area of Ste-Anne-des-Plaines and Montreal. They were the sons of Jacques Belisle and Elmere Therrien of Ste Anne’s. Leon Belisle also known as Leon Despatie was my great-grand-father.

Thru your blog that I just read today, I found out something I never knew and that was Toussaint was a home builder in Ste-Anne’s and it would be neat to know if his brothers helped him on this one.

Well that’s all from me for now. I thank you for taking the time to read this and hope it gave some information that might be helpful to others.

Thank you.

Ronnie Roture dit Belisle dit Depatie

I told you it was going to be an interesting story.

See you next Wednesday.



Who built la Maison Chaumont?

Now that’s a valid question?

But what’s la Maison Chaumont anyway?

Another valid question.

This is la Maison Chaumont…

I took this picture last year when I did a little sightseeing in my hometown of Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines.

You see this house is an historic place as recognized as such by the Quebec government.

Once a small museum, the former town administration emptied it of its furniture and leased it for $200 a  month to le Cercle des Fermières.

The reason given was that it was unoccupied… Go figure.

So what’s the reason to talk about this house anyway?

One of the relatives of the man who built this house sent me a comment.

He said he was related to the man who built this house.

Which brings us back to our first question… Who built la Maison Chaumont?

If you want to know, then come back next Wednesday.

This is going to be quite an interesting story.

I am so excited…

I just got a comment about Father Chaumont.

Things were pretty quiet on my English version of my blog about genealogy…

Click here to read the article I had written about Father Chaumont.

Hello, we are looking at our ancestory and found a birth record for our great grandmother. Here is how it reads. You will see Revd Joseph Chaumont listed on the form. I hope this helps you.

When born: November 6 1906
Where born: St Laurent
Name: Marie Jeanne
Sex: female
Name and Surname of Father: Edward Ducharme
Name and Surname of Mother: Virginia Chaboyer
Occupation or calling of father: Blacksmith
Name of Doctor in attendance or of Midwife or other person if no doctor: Mrs Chaboyer
Name, Description and Residence of Informant: Revd Joseph Chaumont St Laurent
When registered: November 9 1906
Signature of Clerk: [illegible]

I sent an e-mail to see if I could get a copy of the document…

Someone wrote a comment about the Chaumonts…

Some wrote me a a comment in this article…

https://steanne.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/welcome-home-louisiana-prairie-soileau/

Here is the comment:

I was wondering where is the grave of Narcisse Chaumont.

He is my great-great-great grandfather, which I trace by his son Sebastien, and Sebastien’s son Adraste who is my great-grandfather.

Doris Chaumont has a genealogy site about her ancestors. I know a lot about her Chaumonts ancestors but she knows a lot more.

You can pay her a visit here at this address…

http://chaumont.tribalpages.com/

I will tell Doris someone down in the States is looking for his ancestors.


Is this your lucky day?

Is your name Hogue?

Are your parents from Massachusetts or New England?

Then you might be a descendant of Jean-Marie Hogue?

carte mortuaire Jean-Marie-Hogue fils

There are probably thousands of Jean-Marie Hogue’s descendants living in the United States and if they write to me they will have part of their family tree.

And it’s all free…

We go back to Jean Hogue and Nicole Dubus who lived in France around 1650. Their son Pierre Hogue dit St-Malo is the ancestor of Jean-Marie Hogue. Pierre Hogue married Jeanne Théodore on November 10, 1676 in Montreal.

I know they had a son named Pierre Hogue dit Saint-Malo who married Jeanne Théodore. They are the ancestors of Jean-Marie Hogue, the father of Napoléon, Clémentine and of course Jean-Marie.

This is picture of Jean-Marie Hogue…

Jean-Marie Hogue père

Click on the picture to view his file

Jean-Marie Hogue married Rosalie Léveillé on April 16, 1844 in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines. The Léveillés were also called Truchons. Rosalie had a brother, Narcisse Truchon.

Narcisse Truchon dit Léveillé has a son named Arcade Léveillé. Arcade had a daughter, Hermine Léveillé… who married a widower:

Jean-Marie HogueJean-Marie Hogue.

enfants Jean-Marie Hogue

Hermine holding Yvette, with Corine beside her. Adonis is the little boy on the left.

I told you it was your lucky day, and you did not even have to buy the winning ticket…

So if you are a Hogue or know someone who is or was, then write a comment.

Matthias Farnsworth… Does This Name Ring a Bell?

If your name is Phaneuf and you live in Canada or the United States, it should ring a bell…

Have you ever heard about the raids both the English and the French conducted in the late 1690s and early 1700s.

How about the Deerfield massacre?

Matthias Farnsworth was one young lad who was captured… but not in Deerfield.

He was captured in Groton.

Claude-Mathias Fanef was born “Matthias Farnsworth“, at Groton, Massachusetts, on August 6, 1690 (old style calendar in use then in New England). He was the sixth child of Matthias Farnsworth (Matthias II) and Sarah Nutting, who got married at Groton, Massachusetts on March 1st, 1681. 

The grandfather of Claude-Mathias had the same first name Matthias (Matthias I) and he was the first Farnsworth of the ascendant line to cross over to New England. He was born in England around July 20, 1615 in the Manchester area, Lancashire county.

If you look at a map, Groton is just north of Marlborough, Massachusetts. This is where we find Joseph Phaneuf, son of Cora Renaud and Joseph Phaneuf.

Joseph Phaneuf, the husband of Bernadette Hogue, is a direct descendant of Matthias Farnsworth, and he lived his life near the place his ancestor was captured.

I believe I am the first amateur genealogist to find this information.

I wonder if they grow strawberries in Memphis, Tennessee…

That’s exactly why I started an English version of my blog… well let’s say an American version…

To find descendants of people who lived in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines.

famille Hogue vers 1910

Maybe I will become famous and be invited to Jay Leno’s show or Oprah’s or Doctor Phil’s.

I don’t watch much TV since I began looking for my ancestors and other people’s ancestors.

Now what about this picture?

This picture was taken around 1910 at Jean-Marie Hogue’s house in Marlborough, Massachusetts.

Jean-Marie or John Hogue was born in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines on August 2, 1846.

He was a complete stranger to Cécile, who had this picture in her collection, except for Richard and Yvon Lauzon who recalled having seen that particular picture when they were young boys back in the late 50s and the early 60s.

Richard told me he was even mesmerized by it… That picture was hanging on the wall leading to the second floor of one of his relative’s house.

Yvon, Richard and Cécile help me in finding out more about Jean-Marie Hogue. I had also a lot of help from Loulou, one of my readers I told you about.

In the 1870 census, we find Jean-Marie Hogue working in a shoe factory in Malborough, Massachusetts. He is listed as John Hogue. He lived in the boarding house of Aurélie Beauregard with other shoe workers. Aurélie was in fact Aurélie Brodeur married to André Beauregard. One of their daughters was Mélanie Beauregard…

In 1877, we find Jean-Marie in Montreal. He is said to be a cabinet maker. In the 1900 and 1920 censuses, he is back in Malborough where he died on October 8, 1920, at the of age of 74.

Who did John Hogue married…?

Mélanie Beauregard around 1876, in Massachusetts. The same Mélanie back in 1870.

We don’t know the precise date, but we know a son was born on May 15, 1877. Adonis was their first child. He was christened in Montreal. Adonis died on March 11, 1891.

Mélanie and Jean-Marie had another son, Arthur, born in December 1879 and a daughter Bernadette born around 1891. Both were born in the U.S.

This is Arthur Hogue in 1910.

Arthur Hogue

Click on the image to access his file

This is Bernadette in 1910 also.

Augustine Hogue 2

Click on the image to access her file

After his first wife’s death, John Hogue married Hermine Léveillé on March 11, 1893 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.They had two daughters and one son: Corinne, Yvette and Adonis.

Here are their children.

enfants Jean-Marie Hogue

Adonis is the little boy on the left, Corine is beside her mother Hermine Léveillé who is holding Yvette.

What is so special about this man?

John Hogue, like hundred of thousands French Canadians, went to the U.S., raised a family and left numerous descendants and relatives whom we know little about.

Except one…

Next time… Are you ready for this?

Note:

Emigration to New England

From the mid-19th to the early 20th century, the western hemisphere witnessed unprecedented population migration. Europeans crossed the Atlantic to settle in North America, part of the American east coast population moved farther west, and, closer to home, Canadians crossed the border to live in the United States.

From 1840 to 1930 an estimated 900 000 people left Quebec for the United States. Most of these headed to factories in the industrial cities of the northeast, especially in New England. Certain cities such as Lowell, Massachusetts and Manchester, New Hampshire, received thousands of these emigrants. There, they established entire neighbourhoods and parishes of French-Canadian Catholics. There were many reasons for such a population migration: the division of agricultural land among many members of the same family led to a shortage of resources in Quebec. The province also experienced economic problems and the enticement of well-paying American jobs was often irresistible. Although the political elite and the Church tried various means to put a halt to this exodus, they never succeeded in stopping it entirely.

Source

To learn more, click here.