Merry Christmas Redux

I just got curious and I had to look at what I wrote last year for Christmas. Who in his or her right mind would click on all the links on that post?

Who in his or her right mind would write that much on other people’s ancestors? I am sure all these people I found along the way searching for my roots would understand, and I am sure they don’t read all that I wrote on this blog.

You don’t have to.

image001Merry Christmas

Alyce LaGasse where ever you are right now…

Peter Smith where ever you are right now between Asia and Little Snoring…

George Stewart in Hamilton.

Thinkingshift somewhere between NZ and God only knows…

Koji in beautiful sunny Hawaii…

Pacificparatropper in South Florida

Chatter Blog…

Paul D. and La Wanda in NC… 

Joe T. and Lise in Connecticut…

Frank Archambeault in Connecticut…

Sandy L. in Massachusetts…

Robin on the West Coast…

James in Memphis, Tennessee…

Ron Depatie in Ontario who is still addicted to this blog… and wants to know about some of his maternal ancestors…

Marylin Lagasse in Alberta I guess…

Seeburn Chaumont and Pinkie from Louisiana…

Susan…

Fran…

Doris

Marianne…

Dennis IV and his father Lionel…

And a whole lot more people who will make 2014 another great year… ancestors wise.

image002

And a very Merry Christmas to Judy Giguere in Connecticut…

Merry Christmas to all my readers… and my friends…

and to those who will still grieve so much during Christmas time.

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Catch Me if You Can: Closing Chapter Young Myra Alexandre

Yesterday I posted something unintentionally.

Really!

It was a draft article about two sisters and how I found out who they were after a two-year search…

I had kept it in store for the right occasion to post it on the blog.

sisters

Having posted it by mistake, I have decided to follow-up on this unintentional post.

Since I won’t be posting anything new on this blog until next September, unless some of Arthur LaGasa’s descendants come forward, I have decided to reblog some old posts so new readers can see the scope of all the research I have done since September 2009 when I started to write this English version of my blog about genealogy.

This story is quite similar to the story of Delia Roch or Delia Roche that we think is on this old picture…

Eliza Jane Wilson

Koeni LaGasa started the whole thing.

Really!

I had nothing to do about it.

I think this woman is Delia, but I am not 100% sure, not even 50%, not even 25%.

Being 25% sure is just half the fun of searching for lost ancestors…

START OF THE OLD POST (EDITED VERSION)

I don’t believe in spirits, ghosts nor do I believe in reincarnation.

Well maybe spirits… and I can keep an open mind on reincarnation.

young Myra Alexandre

Myra Alexandre died in 1958 when I was 10 years old.

I have never met her. Myra was living in the United States and I was living in Montreal in 1958.

Myra Alexandre and William Archambeault

22 October 1902

I had heard when I was a child that my grandfather Léo Lagacé Senior once had lived in the U.S.

That was the only link between Myra and I.

I did not know Myra had ever existed before 2010 when my third cousin Sandy first contacted me on Ancestry. Since then I have found almost everything about Myra’s life, even met one of her grandsons and had breakfast with him.

So this is the closing chapter of young Myra Alexandre. 

Joe had this cabinet card in his collection when I met him last September. Joe and I went on a scanning frenzy.

Sandy had the same picture of Myra in her collection in 2010. We did not know it was her at that time.

We had few clues.

This is why we had called this young woman Bristol late 1890s.

Sandy had also these.

Phoebe (Flavie) Alexandre Lestage and Myra Alexandre Archambault

I first thought the picture of Myra was that of either Malvina Lagasse or Lillie Lagasse, my grandfather’s sisters.

Boy was I wrong!

I have come a long way since 2010 haven’t I. 

Look at those eyes…

Myra Alexandre 1877-1958

Frank Archambeault (the grandson I had breakfast with) told me his grandmother had quite a strong character.

He did not have to tell me.

Frank  also told me about little Raymond, Myra’s first child.

When Frank, Joe and I visited St. Joseph cemetery I did not know little Raymond Archambeault was resting in peace beside his daughter Marian.

Marian died when she was only 12.

Little Raymond must have been devastated by her death.

I know I would have been.

Myra Alexandre died in 1958 at the age of 81. Marian was four years old. Myra probably played with her granddaughter Marian sometimes like I do with my two grandchildren.

I love to play with my grandchildren probably like Stanislas Lagacé  seen here with his grandchildren Marie Rose Elmira and Harvey Lagasse when they were young.

I don’t believe in reincarnation, but if I did, I think I am the reincarnation of Grandpa Lagassy…

Just a thought.

END OF THE OLD EDITED POST

Now you know why I am addicted to old pictures and why I am trying to identify who is this young woman from the past, part of Joe’s collection of old pictures…

unknown young lady

and why I am so interested in that man… a deep sea diver in Alaska,

unknown maybe Joe

and finding all the excuses in the world to keep writing this blog…

After First Bull Run… Warwick Creek

First Bull Run… Warwick Creek?

Never heard of those places before I heard Alexander Bennett had deserted the Union army in September 12, 1863 after the New York riotings.

I just got curious about him deserting. Then I found out that he was not the only one who did.

He does not have to feel ashamed nor his descendants for that matter.

No way!

What were the battles in which Alexander Bennett took part as a Private in the 2nd Vermont Infantry after First Bull Run?

 4/6/1862, Warwick Creek, VA

    4/16/1862, Lee’s Mill, VA

    6/26/1862, Golding’s Farm, VA

    6/29/1862, Savage’s Station, VA

    6/30/1862, White Oak Swamp, VA

    9/14/1862, Crampton’s Gap, MD

    9/17/1862, Antietam, MD

    12/13/1862, Fredericksburg, VA

    5/3/1863, Marye’s Heights, VA

    5/4/1863, Salem Heights, VA

    6/5/1863, Fredericksburg, VA

    7/3/1863, Gettysburg, Penn.

After the battle of Gettysburg, Alexander Bennett deserted when he was stationed with the 2nd Vermont Infantry around New York to guard against riotings.

Do you remember this from the last post?

Roughly half a million Union soldiers and sailors were foreign-born. Indeed, a large proportion of the immigrants were of military age and there was a higher proportion of males among the foreign-born than in the general population. Proportionally, they could furnish more soldiers than native-born America. The sheer numerical importance of foreign-born recruitment has given rise to a persistent Southern myth that “the majority of Yankee soldiers were foreign hirelings.” However, nothing could be further from the truth. While the foreign-born contribution to the Union cause was crucial and increased with time, it was not as massive as some historians have claimed it to be. In fact, foreign-born men, who accounted for about a quarter of the servicemen, represented roughly 30 percent of the males of military age in the Union states. Immigrants were thus under-represented in the Union forces. Catholics, especially the Irish, were the most under-represented group in proportion to population. This can be explained in part by the Democratic allegiance of a majority of American Catholics and by their opposition to Republican war goals and policy, especially emancipation and conscription. In New York City, Irish resistance to military conscription spawned the infamous draft riot of 1863, which terrorized the city and left at least 105 people dead. To this day, it remains the worst riot in American history.

Seeing what was happening in New York was probably what broke the camel’s back for Alexander Bennett. You have to remember how people were enlisted in the first place…

poster Company G

So what about the battle of Warwick Creek, the second battle Alexander Bennett, a French-Canadian, took part in? 

790px-Yorktown1862

Yorktown

Hard to find information, but I managed to find this.

Civil War battles in Virginia 1862

Other Names: None

Location: York County and Newport News

Campaign: Peninsula Campaign (March-September 1862)

Date(s): April 5-May 4, 1862

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan [US]; Maj. Gen. John B. Magruder and Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Armies

Estimated Casualties: 320 total

Description:

Marching from Fort Monroe, Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan’s army encountered Maj. Gen. John B. Magruder’s small Confederate army at Yorktown behind the Warwick River. Magruder’s theatrics convinced the Federals that his works were strongly held. McClellan suspended the march up the Peninsula toward Richmond, ordered the construction of siege fortifications, and brought his heavy siege guns to the front. In the meantime, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston brought reinforcements for Magruder. On 16 April, Union forces probed a weakness in the Confederate line at Lee’s Mill or Dam No. 1, resulting in about 309 casualties. Failure to exploit the initial success of this attack, however, held up McClellan for two additional weeks, while he tried to convince his navy to maneuver the Confederates big guns at Yorktown and Gloucester Point and ascend the York River to West Point thus outflanking the Warwick Line. McClellan planned for a massive bombardment to begin at dawn on May 4, but the Confederate army slipped away in the night toward Williamsburg.

Result(s): Inconclusive

I found this information about the battle here. It’s about another Vermont Regiment.

March 10, 1862, the regiment broke camp and entered upon its first field work, the Peninsula campaign.  Embarking at Alexandria on the 23d, it landed at Fortress Monroe on the 24th, and on the 4th of April commenced its march up the Peninsula, arriving in front of the enemy on Warwick Creek on the next day.  On the 6th the regiment was for the first time under fire in support of a battery, during a demonstration made by the division upon the Confederate works.  It was, however, subjected to no loss, and it was not until the 16th of April, at Lee’s Mills, that it received its “baptism of fire.”  On that day the right wing crossed Warwick Creek, through water up to the waist, under a severe and galling fire, and attacked the enemy’s works.  At the moment of success it was decided to abandon the attack and they were ordered to retire.  The loss of the regiment in this battle was 23 killed and mortally wounded, and 57 wounded, the bulk of the loss being from the right wing.  Thereafter the regiment remained in sight of the enemy, doing picket duty, during the remainder of the month of April, with no incident worthy of note, except that on the 29th it made a reconnoissance resulting in a slight skirmish.  Lieut. A. M. Nevins of company G was mortally wounded, and a man in Company K wounded.

I wonder how Alexander Bennett felt after Warwick Creek.

Bertha Lagasse Austin

Note

Since this was posted earlier this year, we have found the identify of the young woman on the picture. She’s Bertha’s sister Odna Lagasse.

Bertha

START

Well the time has come…

Teresa had posted a comment this week after reading my post Out of Gas?

Good Evening,
  
My name is Teresa Brooks Pease.  
I am a descendant of Bertha Lagasse Austin.  My Grandmother is Elizabeth (Betty) Austin DeWick.  I dont have very much information about the Austin/Lagasse and as my grandmother just passed December of 2012. 
I’m not sure I will be able to provide you with any futher information other than what my grandfather may have.  
Please feel free to contact me.  
I would love to learn more about my family history.

“Please feel free to contact me.  I would love to learn more about my family history.”

I was all excited.

Now I should be able to get confirmation if Bertha Austin née Lagasse is really on this picture because Teresa wrote again.

And I thought that I had scared her away!

I also found out that Teresa and I are 2nd cousins twice removed which means we share this common ancestor

Soldier of the Régiment Carignan-Salières Illustrator Francis Back

and this one…

Dennis Lagasse II

Stanislas Lagacé 1842-1927

Stanislas Lagacé is her great-great-great-grandfather while he is my great-grandfather. That’s the twice removed thing. Her great-great-grandfather is Dennis Lagasse III, Bertha’s father.

He is this man under the hat with four of his five sons. Harry Lagasse is not on the picture.

Dennis Lagasse III and some of his sons

Napoleon Levi, Harvey, Victor Philip, ? (a cousin?) and Joseph

Priceless picture isn’t for someone who has no pictures of their ancestors…

Dennis Lagasse III is my grandfather’s brother Léo Lagacé Senior. Dennis (his real given name is Stanislas) was born in 1864 and Leo in 1888. 24 years apart. Dennis died in 1922 and my grandfather died in 1964.

acte de deces leo lagace senior

Priceless document…

That’s the clue that got me here writing this blog. I knew nothing about my grandfather’s ancestors back in 2007 when I got addicted to genealogy. 

Curious?

Click here.

Getting back to Teresa who knows very little about her ancestors, she told me about her grandaunt Dorothy Austin and her granduncle William Austin who are still living. They are Bertha Lagasse’s children. They should be able to identify their mother on the picture, and they should have more pictures to share.

At least I hope so.

I just have a few notes on Bertha, and last month, while checking my family tree, I found her in the 1940 U.S. Census.

That’s a great place to start looking for clues when you know what you are looking for.

1940 William Austin family

William Austin was an electrician and he was living at 235 Union Avenue in West Haven, Connecticut.

grandma_berts_house

We don’t have pictures of these people in the censuses. Luckily for us we had Lionel Lagasse’s family album. He brought it with him when he visited his son Dennis last fall. Back in 2011 Dennis Lagasse did not know much about his roots. He found my blog or I found him on a genealogy forum, can’t recall…

In a split second he became Dennis Lagasse IV and he found all about his French-Canadian roots right up to André Mignier.

Soldier of the Régiment Carignan-Salières Illustrator Francis Back

soldier of Carignan-Salière regiment

I think he was elated to find his virtual 2nd cousin once removed from Quebec.

This is a picture he first shared with me. I was all excited. I call it my Rosetta stone.

I knew who these people were. 

His great-grandfather Dennis Lagasse III is seen her with his wife Amanda Ménard and their family. 11 children, 5 boys and 6 girls.

Last September Dennis sent me lots of new pictures with lots of people photographed… but Bertha was nowhere to be seen.

Anyway…

Since I had found everything on Bertha’s roots, I had focused my search on William Austin.

Well lo and behold! His real name was not Austin after all.

Curious?

Out of gas?

man with car

I know some people down South who are hoping I don’t run out.

Dennis Lagasse wedding picture

Bertha? Now We Will Find out

I wrote this post a few months ago.

Start

Why am I writing so much about Our Ancestors?

It’s because of your ancestors like Bertha Lagasse seen here, first row on the left. Well I think she is Bertha Lagasse.

This picture was sent by Robin last year. It was part of more than 100 pictures she scanned even though she is not directly related to us.

She shares the same passion.

I had quickly identified Levi Napoleon, Ida, and perhaps Bertha Lagasse thanks to this other picture Dennis IV had sent me which is, in a way, a kind of Rosetta stone.

Dennis sent me last September a lot of new pictures with a lot of people photographed…

Levi Napoleon and Ida are seen on almost each one, but Bertha is not anywhere to be seen. Most of these people should be related to Dubés or Dubes as seen on U.S. censuses.

One day someone will write a comment like Judy did and the floogates will open wide.

End

Well the time has come…

Good Evening,
 
My name is Teresa Brooks Pease.  
I am a descendant of Bertha Lagasse Austin.  My Grandmother is Elizabeth (Betty) Austin DeWick.  I dont have very much information about the Austin/Lagasse and as my grandmother just passed December of 2012.
I’m not sure I will be able to provide you with any futher information other than what my grandfather may have.  
Please feel free to contact me.  
I would love to learn more about my family history.

Seniors Have Their Own Texting Codes

Sent by my 3rd cousin Joe whose 8th grandaunt’s husband is Jean Nicolet.

5-Jean-Nicolet-au-Wisconsin-statue4

Some new text codes

Young people have theirs, now Seniors have their own texting codes:

* ATD- At the Doctor’s

* BFF – Best Friends Funeral

* BTW- Bring the Wheelchair

* BYOT – Bring Your Own Teeth

* CBM- Covered by Medicare

* CUATSC- See You at the Senior Center

* DWI- Driving While Incontinent

* FWIW – Forgot Where I Was

* GGPBL- Gotta Go, Pacemaker Battery Low

* GHA – Got Heartburn Again

* HGBM – Had Good Bowel Movement

* LMDO- Laughing My Dentures Out

* LOL- Living on Lipitor

* OMSG – Oh My! Sorry, Gas

* TOT- Texting on Toilet

* WAITT – Who Am I Talking To?

Hope these help. GGLKI (Gotta Go, Laxative Kicking in!)

 

Martha Raye… Who Knew?

I am not related to Martha Raye neither is Joe T.

Joe is my 3rd cousin, the guy from Connecticut, who sends me joke sometimes.

Joe sent me this with this comment…

Interesting

=joet=

It was well recognized that Martha Raye endured less comfort and more danger than any other Vietnam entertainer.
The most unforgivable oversight of TV is that her shows were not taped.
I was unaware of her credentials or where she is buried.

Somehow I just can’t see Brittany Spears, Paris Hilton, or Jessica Simpson doing what this woman (and the other USO women, including Ann Margaret & Joey Heatherton) did for our troops in past wars.

Most of the old time entertainers were made of a lot sterner stuff than today’s crop of activists bland whiners.
The following is from an Army Aviator who takes a trip down memory lane:
“It was just before Thanksgiving ’67 and we were ferrying dead and wounded from a large GRF west of Pleiku. We had run out of body bags by noon, so the Hook (CH-47 CHINOOK) was pretty rough in the back.

All of a sudden, we heard a ‘take-charge’ woman’s voice in the rear.
There was the singer and actress, Martha Raye, with a SF (Special Forces)
beret and jungle fatigues, with subdued markings, helping the wounded into
the Chinook, and carrying the dead aboard.
‘Maggie’ had been visiting her SF ‘heroes’ out ‘west’.

We took off, short of fuel, and headed to the USAF hospital pad at Pleiku.
As we all started unloading our sad pax’s, a ‘Smart Mouth’ USAF Captain said
to Martha…. “Ms Raye, with all these dead and wounded to process, there would
not be time for your show!”

To all of our surprise, she pulled on her right collar and said ……”Captain,
see this eagle? I am a full ‘Bird’ in the USArmy Reserve, and on this is a ‘Caduceus’
which means I am a Nurse, with a surgical specialty….now, take me to your wounded!”
He said, “Yes ma’am…. follow me.”
Several times at the Army Field Hospital in Pleiku, she would ‘cover’ a surgical shift, giving a nurse a well-deserved break.

Martha is the only woman buried in the SF (Special Forces) cemetery at Ft Bragg.

 

Hand Salute! A great lady..
I did not know this about Martha Raye….
thought you might like to read it.