Back to square one…? Take Two

This will be a follow-up about a post I wrote back in March 2011. This is the original post.

START

Remember this couple I was talking about last Monday?

I thought in 2009 that they were the newly-weds in a picture taken around 1910 in Marlborough, Massachusetts.

I still thought so until Wednesday night when someone sent me a picture.

Here’s the “big picture” of this big picture.

I thought in 2009 that this picture had been taken in 1910.

Think again because someone told me that her relatives had this picture also.

It was taken probably on April 14, 1909 when Bernadette Levasseur, sister of Ida Levasseur, married Joseph Phaneuf.

The woman I had identified as Bernadette Hogue is probably Bernadette Levasseur.

Is this what they will call a soap opera in the future?

Look at this picture someone sent me.

Joseph Brière’s family

It does not belong to her.

She found it on Ancestry.

I still don’t have permission to use it, but I think you will understand why I am posting it.

Compare with this…

1909, Marlborough, Massachusetts

And this montage…

 

I will try to get permission to post the picture I posted without permission.

Then, I will tell you more, a whole lot more next Monday.

END

I have identified more people on the wedding picture… I will tell you more next time.

Ellen Elizabeth Doucette

Joseph Brière’s family

Robin’s pictures

There were so many pictures Robin scanned to look at that some were left to be identified later.

This one I think is directly related to my distant relatives.

scan0010

We have to assume that Sylvia Elizabeth Bleau wrote the caption if we compare both handwriting.

scan0041

I am no expert, but it seems that way.

handwriting

Mary Malloy or Molloy would be Bertha Molloy the daughter of Philomène Alexandre and Thomas Molloy. Philomène is related to this family. These are her parents with her sisters Myra, Agnes and Helen.

the Alexandre Family

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre’s family

Mary was born 23 April 1893 in Adams, Berkshire, Massachusetts.

Here’s another picture also scanned by Robin.

scan0020

Agnes Maloy… Same handwriting. Different persons?

Agnes Maloy

Not that important unless you are related to her. Thomas Molloy and Philomène Alexandre had these children:

James Thomas Molloy 1887 –
Jean-Baptiste Molloy 1890 –
Agnes Marie Rose Molloy 1892 – 1894
Bertha Molloy 1893 –
Eva Molloy 1895 – 1896
Albert Molloy 1897 – 1897

The only possible Mary Malloy or Agnes Maloy is  Bertha Molloy born in 1893.

Philomène died in 1906.

information on Philomene Malloy

She was the sister of Agnes Alexandre, Sylvia Elizabeth’s mother.

Agnes Alexandre

So this makes sense.

I never could find much more on Thomas Molloy. Sometimes you hit a dead en, but sometimes someone write a comment and the floodgates open.

Now there was one more picture without a caption.

scan0050

He could be anyone, even Bertha Molloy’s brother.

Remember Good Old Holyoke?

Ed had sent me this message along with his 31 pictures of unidentified ancestors.

After our little discussion of the Alexander family and from what little research I have done, I believe I have some old photographs that might be from their family.  When my aunt died in 1963, her mother, my grandmother, brought back to Georgia a steamer trunk containing some of my aunt’s things.  In that trunk was a group of old photographs.  They were in my grandmother’s things in 1975 when she died and they have finally come to rest with me. 

No one was ever able to tell me anything about the pictures (I never even thought to ask Uncle George).  They are of babies, children, families, and individual men and women, all dating to the late 1800s and early 1900s. 

None have any names indicating whom the pictures are of, however some do have photographer’s marks.  There are 31 photographs and 16 have Holyoke, Massachusetts labels, 2 have Quebec labels, and 1 has a label from Bristol, Connecticut.  These are all places associated with the Alexanders.  In 1920 and 1930, Jean-Baptiste and his family were living in Bristol, CT; in 1910, they were in Holyoke, MA and prior to that, they were in Quebec.   

All of Ed’s 31 pictures did not look familiar at first glance.

Even Robin had this comment…

What a challenge! Are we up to it?

All were unidentified ancestors until Frank sent me this picture of  John Archambeault.

He is Jean-Baptiste Archambeault’s and Emilia Mercier’s son. John Archambeault married Florence Boucher. He could be the same man seen in this montage I made with one of Ed’s pictures.

I had this picture identified as family 1.

Family 1

You have to start somewhere don’t you…

Anyway, this Family 1 could be John Archambault with his wife Florence Boucher and a daughter. I know they had at least four daughters… because Frank told me.

Flora Archambault (1873)

Lillie (Lillian) Archambault (1877)

Alice Archambault (4 July 1878)

Nellie (Helen) Archambault 1884

Nellie could be the daughter on the picture.

Now if we turn our attention to Family 2.

Family 2

Could this family be also related to the Archambeault family…?

How about his one then and all other 28 pictures sent by Frank that were all unidentified ancestors?

Family 3

 I have no idea.

About John Archambeault…

I believe it’s him on these two pictures.

If this is John, then this could be John with his daughter Flora born in 1873.

I know sometimes I might be hard to follow…

Frobe Lagasse and his sister Alice

This is just to set up the stage… because I found a distant cousin.

Maybe he’s a 4th or a 5th cousin, I don’t know, but that’s not the point.

I have copied a post from December 2009… That’s quite a long time ago.

This is the file of Frobe Lagasse.

Frobe is a second cousin.

His grandfather was Pierre Lagacé who was my great-great-grandfather’s brother.

Few people know Frobe’s ancestors  but I do.

Having found all my Lagacé’s ancestors, I am now looking for distant relatives.

Frobe married Valéda Forand in 1897. They had at least two children: Joseph Norman Lagasse and Blanche Lagasse.

There are two people who also have Frobe Lagasse in their data banks.

The problem is that they say that Frobe Lagasse died in 1964.

Frobe died in 1915 and this is his death certificate.

Click on the image it will appear in another window

Here are some information about Norman Lagasse.

He was born in January 1899 in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Blanche was born around 1905.

In the 1920 U.S. Census, Valéda and Blanche are living together. I had found no traces of Norman.

There might not be any descendants of Frobe Lagasse who was the son of Adolphe Lagasse an undertaker in Massachusetts around 1909.

Okay, now light, camera, action…!

Only my very distant relative knows that this pun is intended.

He is related to this woman. She is Alice Lagasse, Frobe Lagasse’s sister. She’s a 2nd cousin.

I never got the time to post her picture on this blog because no descendants had ever wrote me about that branch.

Alice was first married to Olivier Caron.

My new found distant cousin knows little very about Olivier Caron.

So do I.

 

But at least I can try…

See you next time maybe, unless I scared away another distant cousin of mine…

Marie-Louise Blanchard

If you are reading my blog for the first time, then you have to go back in time and read this article first and then proceed from there… If you don’t, it’s like watching only the last 5 minutes of a great classic movie.

LAST FIVE MINUTES…

I told you I had this feeling yesterday.

Would your great-grandmother’s or your grandmother’s name be Marie-Louise Blanchard? Would your great-grandfather’s or your grandfather’s name be Raoul J. Vezina?

Are you related to their children that I had found back in 2007?

Armand Vézina 1908 –
Lionel Vézina 1909 –
Émile Vézina 1911 – 1928
Raoul Vézina 1914 –
Louise Vézina 1918 –

If you are, then you’re in for a big surprise.

 

9 October, 1907, Springfield, Massachusetts

This is your great-grandparents’ or your grandparents’ wedding picture, and this is your great-grandfather’s or grandfather’s picture when he was young.

They could be also your great-great-grandparents.

This is a family picture supposedly taken in 1927 with Joseph Olivier Vezina your ancestor.

He is wearing the long overall.

The woman next to him is Josephine, his third wife, because Hermine Paiement, his second wife died in 1916. He was first married to Églantine Farmer.

I know a lot don’t I? It’s because I dig a lot…

This is Hermine’s mortuary card.

Want more?

Want to know Raoul’s occupation?

Pharmacist.

His birthdate?

February 9, 1884.

His father’s occupation in 1900?

Pawnbroker.

When did Raoul died? I am not sure about this one. Probably in January 1967.

I found a lot, but that’s not the point I want to make.

The point is finding relatives to be able to share all these pictures  just like I did with Fran.

So we will have to wait for someone to Google something like Raoul Vézina on the Internet and hope they find this blog someday.

Next time, how this great movie ends.

The Time is Right

If you are reading my blog for the first time, then you have to go back in time and read this article first and then proceed from there… If you don’t, it’s like watching only the last 5 minutes of a great classic movie.

PROCEED…

I hope Fran has been reading my blog since Monday. I have not heard from her since last weekend.

She probably never heard about Raoul Vézina.

Try Googling that on the Internet.

I had this picture since July 2007.

I think the time is right to show it.

Raoul Vézina was the son of Herminie Paiement.

At least I think so.

This is a younger Raoul.

Same hair do.

This is a family picture taken probably in Springfield, Massachusetts.

This is the original.

A Chrismas card sent in 1927 to someone in Ste-Marthe in Vaudreuil County in the province of Quebec.

I know this is not Christmas time, but I just wanted to put a smile on Fran’s face if she is reading this.

Before I leave, one more thing about Raoul… I did not do a lot of research on that family back in 2007 when I first scanned them.

What I know was put on my Ancestry site.

Now, the time is right to go looking for those people’s descendants in the U.S.  Of course I am going to start looking for Marie’s surname.

Something is telling me I won’t have any problem.

Mystery wowen

Welcome back… I hope you have visited this blog a few times. 

Back to this blog, Robin, a member of the A-Team, said in her comment she posted…

What a challenge! Are we up to it?

I answered back…

We won’t know until we try.

You never thought how addictive cabinet cards were didn’t you?

They become more addictive when you can put a name on someone’s face.

Mother and daughter? That’s for sure, but no names, just the photographer’s name.

B. F. Ogden, from Springfield, Massachusetts.

That the only clue unless my cousin Sandy takes a look at the women’s clothing and tells me when it was in style.

Another one. Again from Springfield, Massachusetts.

I sent all the 31 pictures to Sandy. She wanted to take a look. I am sure she will get hooked and give me some clues on when the pictures were taken just by looking at the women’s clothing.

See you around. Until then, subscribe to the other blog about cabinet cards.

You could find your ancestors.

I’m sure that the man featured in this photo is my great great grandfather Per Ambjorn Sparre. He was an inventor amongst other things and actually created the first perforated postage stamps in Stockholm. He married an Italian woman and spent much of his life in Paris. There is a wealth of information about him in Swedish. He was Louis Sparre’s (My great grandfather) father. It was a pleasure seeing this photo for me! I have a painting that looks exactly the same.

Where do I start…? Well in good old Holyoke of course!

Ed sent me this message along with his 31 pictures of unidentied ancestors.

After our little discussion of the Alexander family and from what little research I have done, I believe I have some old photographs that might be from their family.  When my aunt died in 1963, her mother, my grandmother, brought back to Georgia a steamer trunk containing some of my aunt’s things.  In that trunk was a group of old photographs.  They were in my grandmother’s things in 1975 when she died and they have finally come to rest with me. 

No one was ever able to tell me anything about the pictures (I never even thought to ask Uncle George).  They are of babies, children, families, and individual men and women, all dating to the late 1800s and early 1900s. 

None have any names indicating whom the pictures are of, however some do have photographer’s marks.  There are 31 photographs and 16 have Holyoke, Massachusetts labels, 2 have Quebec labels, and 1 has a label from Bristol, Connecticut.  These are all places associated with the Alexanders.  In 1920 and 1930, Jean-Baptiste and his family were living in Bristol, CT; in 1910, they were in Holyoke, MA and prior to that, they were in Quebec.   

All of Ed’s 31 pictures do not ring a bell at all when I look at them closely, so, in point of fact, this should ring a bell.

Could these people be related in some way to the Courchesnes. Odila Courchesne (Courchaine) was George Alexander’s mother? 

None of these people has any facial ressemblance with the Alexanders I have pictures of.

And I do have a lot!

So let’s go full speed ahead with the three family pictures Ed sent and let’s try to find some clues. This will be quite a fascinating journey into the unknown.

Family 1

This is Family 1, for now that is. A man, a woman and a young lady. Daughter, mother and father? Most probably.

I don’t have a faintess clue how they are related to the Alexanders. Also nothing on the Internet about Welcome & Covey photographers. They seemed to have been established in 1894. So this picture is taken in or after 1894 in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

That’s not a lot to go on.

In my search, I found that this picture is called a cabinet card. I like to learn new things. It must be evident if you have been reading this blog from the start.

Now let’s turn our attention to Family 2.

Family 2

Again Welcome & Covey… 1894… 175 High St., Holyoke, Mass.

My 3rd cousin told me once that very youngs boys were dressed like girls in those days. So the girl could be a boy with his father and mother. Notice that the little boy puts his hand on his father’s shoulder.

Still no clue though, but I am sure you would like to put on name on these faces.

Last family picture…

Family 3

New photographer!

I found information about B. F. Ogden on this site, the same one I found the information about cabinet cards

WHAT IS A CABINET CARD?

Welcome to the Cabinet Card Gallery. Cabinet card photographs were first introduced in 1866. They were initially employed for landscapes rather than portraitures. Cabinet cards replaced Carte de visite photographs as the popular mode of photography.  Cabinet cards became the standard for photographic portraits in 1870. Cabinet cards experienced their peak in popularity in the 1880′s.  Cabinet cards were still being produced in the United States until the early 1900′s and continued to be produced in Europe even longer. The best way to describe a cabinet card is that it is a thin photograph that is mounted on a card that measures 4 1/4″ by 6 1/2″. Cabinet cards frequently have artistic logos and information on the bottom or the reverse of the card which advertised the photographer or the photography studio’s services. Enjoy your visit.

Fascinating site!

Getting back to Ed’s cabinet cards, I have no idea who this family is.

This could take years you know…, but I am patient like Ed.

Next time women’s pictures if you’re still interested.

As a footnote to all this, click here.

I will be back on Monday.

Thank You for Getting Back to Me… Take Two

This was part of Sandy’s  message on my Ancestry Message Boards back in 2010.

Hi Pierre,

Thank you for getting back to me.

With your information online. They match up to my family tree.

Last year a cousin gave me quite a few photos of the Lagasse line. And I have been researching them with where they were taken. They are from Bristol, Connecticut and Rhode Island. And I have just cleared up a mystery on the Dennis Lagasse  person as he changed his name from Stanislas Lagasse who married Henriette Alexandre.

I have been going round and round with the name Dennis Lagasse. I think the photos I have are from this family. Not sure of the names, but they are taken in Bristol, Connecticut. I have gotten all the way back on our line. Lots of information. I have researched the whole line that was in Fall River, Massachusetts and New Bedford, Massachusetts, and Bristol, Connecticut on the Lagasse line.

My line from Stanislas Lagasse and Onésime Cadieux. Their child  Pierre Lagasse married Mathilde Leblanc.

Click on the image

Sandy had pictures that made it possible to reach out to distant relatives like Carl yesterday and many more.

If you have been reading my blog, then you know I won’t sell you any coats of arms or coffee mugs.

In fact I don’t sell nothing. However I am quick to react when someone ask for my help… I just can’t help this addiction of mine.

Hello Pierre

My grandfather Charles Henry Lagasse is from Falls River MA and I believe his father is from RI. Henry C. Lagasse RI/1892 M. Edith Mullane. Perhaps you can help me in my search for family history?

Thank you

Click on the image

I just found a new fourth cousin once removed.

She, in turn, found a whole lot more than a fourth cousin.

Back to square one…?

Not quite to square one.

Remember this couple I was talking about last Monday?

I thought in 2009 that they were the newly-weds in a picture taken around 1910 in Marlborough, Massachusetts.

I still thought so until Wednesday night when someone sent me a picture.

Here’s the “big picture” of this big picture.

I thought in 2009 that this picture had been taken in 1910.

Think again because someone told me that her relatives had this picture also.

It was taken probably on April 14, 1909 when Bernadette Levasseur, sister of Ida Levasseur, married Joseph Phaneuf.

The woman I had identified as Bernadette Hogue is probably Bernadette Levasseur.

Is this what they will call a soap opera in the future?

 

Look at this picture someone sent me.

Joseph Brière’s family

It does not belong to her.

She found it on Ancestry.

I still don’t have permission to use it, but I think you will understand why I am posting it.

 

Compare with this…

1909, Marlborough, Massachusetts

 

And this montage…



I will try to get permission to post the picture I posted without permission.

Then, I will tell you more, a whole lot more next Monday.

Joseph Brière’s family