Agnes Lagaser – Wife of Leon Saucier – Redux

Pierre Lagacé:

One for GP…

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

This is what started this neverending story.

I am reposting it because someone answered my call for the headstones she posted on Find A Grave.

Lisa took those pictures and she allowed me to post them on the blog.

Collection Lisa H.

She took those pictures in Mount Calvary Cemetery, a cemetery in New Hampshire.

Click here for a virtual visit.

These pictures were a great help in finding Irene’s ancestors and descendants.

Irene Wilcox

Collection Jason West

Irene was the daughter of Adélard or Théodore Turcotte who changed his name to Wilcox. I don’t know why Adélard Turcotte used that name since it does not sound a bit like Turcotte.

Maybe it does if you say Turcotte fast enough.

This being said, start reading the old post I wrote back in December when I first contacted Jason, and make sense of all this.

Original post

My blog is really like a…

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Family Feuds Or The Spice Of Genealogy

Pierre Lagacé:

I haven’t read it yet but I am sure it is good.

Originally posted on Moore Genealogy:

From left to right. Back Row; Pauline Bonnett, Florence Bonnett and Claude Bonnett.  Front Row Harry Bonnett, Bessie Barney Bonnett, Verna Bonnett, and Mary Guyette Barney Douglas. Picture taken about 1913. From left to right. Back Row; Pauline Bonnett, Florence Bonnett and Claude Bonnett. Front Row Harry Bonnett, Bessie Barney Bonnett, Verna Bonnett, and Mary Guyette Barney Douglas. Picture taken about 1913.

The pictures in this post were an incredible find. I obtained them by contacting a person who had a family tree listed in ancestry.com. While it was not very complete, it held some information that caught my interest. I sent a request to the tree owner asking if we could exchange information. I believe this is something we all should do as it helps us all in our genealogy research. I cannot understand why some of us are so reluctant to share our information. This time however I hit the genealogy jackpot. I was soon put in touch with Julia, who was the keeper of the family records. She was to send me old family letters, pictures, property transfer…

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About the 1944 fire in Hartford

Contribution by one of my reader…

Pierre,
thought this might be of interest to you, published in today’s Daily Mail
Chris

‘I was worried her soul would never rest': Fire captain CRITICIZED for ‘poor judgement’ after removing naked photos of dead girl, 8, killed in a 1944 circus blaze from the walls of his firehouse

  • The big top fire at the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus in July 1944 is considered one of the worst fires in American history
  • 167 people died and 700 were injured in the blaze
  • A photo of eight-year-old victim Eleanor Cook has been up on the walls of the Hartford Fire Department engine 14 station for years
  • Outgoing Captain William Pond took it down and destroyed
  • He said it was ‘publicly displaced in this horrific manner’
  • Incoming Captain Carlos Huertas said the decision was one of ‘poor judgement’ and ‘demonstrated a lack of professional’

 

Click here.

Too precious a comment to be left in the comment section

From Carol…

 

Hi Pierre,

As you know, I am related to many of the folks on the St. Ann’s Parish page. I just now realized that many of the families were descendents of Acadian exiles who established the parish of L’Acadie in Quebec after they were not allowed to return to Nova Scotia. St. Anne’s had been their church in Nova Scotia, and then when they founded the parish of L’Acadie in Quebec, they of course constructed a new St. Anne’s.

By the mid 1800s, many of the families had migrated south to Stanbridge East in Canada, where they stayed for a generation or two, before migrating down south to Bristol, CT. Of course they would once again establish a St. Ann’s church. I’ve aways wondered what caused so many of the families to leave L’Acadie, Quebec for Stanbridge East. I think many of the men may have fought in the war of 1812 and been given land grants.

If anyone can explain that leg of the migration, please let me know…. but it is certainly fascinating to watch the families hang together for hundreds of years.

Carol Valentine