How I met your ancestors? – Episode Five: East Bristol around 1916

Pierre Lagacé:

For you David my new found second cousin once removed

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

I have to start somewhere don’t I?

Bristol circa 1916 seems a good place to start.

original picture of the Lagasse family

Imagine I am a young photographer taking this picture. I would be a family member, and I would be just starting a new career in photography..

Why not immortalize these people with “Pepere”…

original picture of the Lagasse family

Original picture from old photo album of someone’s private collection

Sometimes meeting your ancestors will fall short on expectations.

This was something that was not meant to be…

Using this picture?

Please contact me if you use this picture. I don’t mind sharing. I appreciate the fact that you ask first.

This is what I wrote on my “private” family tree on Ancestry with this picture.

Some members I have invited had reposted this picture on their “public” tree, and some other people on Ancestry were using it without asking first. I wish they would contact me because I know much…

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Senior Moments

Pierre Lagacé:

Senior moments revisited

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

I did not know that expression until I visited Joe…

I had a lot of senior moments during my trip to Connecticut trying to remember some of the names while I was visiting cemeteries with Joe and Frank.

We visited St. Thomas and St. Joseph cemeteries if I remember the names correctly.

As usual I took a lot of pictures.

You never know when these will help in further research.

We started first at St. Thomas cemetery which I had visited last year.

Frank Archambeault was looking for some of his ancestors buried there, but he could not find any headstones that would lead him to them. I took this picture where some of his ancestors would be buried.

My great-grandfather Dennis Lagasse (1842-1927) and his father Stanislas Lagacé (1816-1900) have to be also buried at St. Joseph’s, but I only found two of Dennis Lagasse’s sons’ headstones:

Stanislas Lagassey……

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Child Labour

http://bjws.blogspot.ca/2012/09/women-children-working-in-early-20th.html

EXCERPT

Lewis Wickes Hine, born in 1874 in Wisconsin & died in 1940, was an American sociologist & photographer. Using his camera as a tool for social reform, his photographs were instrumental in changing child labor laws in the United States. His photos were accompanied by descriptions supplied by witnesses, which are related in the captions here.

In 1908-1912, he became the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee. Over the next decade, Hine documented children working at home & in American industry to aid the NCLC’s lobbying efforts to end the practice. Photos are at the Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

 

Harry Lagasse  is seen here with  his baby  boy and his missing finger…

four generations of Lagasse - Dennis II, Dennis III, Harry Lagasse and Gerard Lagasse

Has been on my to-do list…

http://www.danielnpaul.com/ChristopherColumbus.html

 

Excerpt

Bill Bigelow taught high school social studies in Portland, Ore. for almost 30 years. He is the curriculum editor of “Rethinking Schools” and the co-director of the Zinn Education Project. This project offers free materials to teach people’s history and an “If We Knew Our History” article series. Bigelow is author or co-editor of numerous books, including “A People’s History” for the Classroom and “The Line Between Us: Teaching About the Border and Mexican Immigration”.

“For years, I opened my 11th-grade U.S. history classes by asking students, “What’s the name of that guy they say discovered America?” A few students might object to the word “discover,” but they all knew the fellow I was talking about, “Christopher Columbus!”, several called out in unison.

“Right. So who did he find when he came here?” I asked. Usually, a few students would say, “Indians,” but I asked them to be specific: “Which nationality? What are their names?”

Silence.

In more than 30 years of teaching U.S. history and guest-teaching in others’ classes, I’ve never had a single student say, “Taínos.” So I ask them to think about that fact. “How do we explain that? We all know the name of the man who came here from Europe, but none of us knows the name of the people who were here first—and there were hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of them. Why haven’t you heard of them?”

 

This ignorance is an artifact of historical silencing—rendering invisible the lives and stories of entire peoples. It’s what educators began addressing in earnest 20 years ago, during plans for the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival in the Americas, which at the time the boasted would be “the most stupendous international celebration in the history of notable celebrations.” Native American and social justice activists, along with educators of conscience, pledged to interrupt the festivities.” The full story Rethinking Columbus: Towards a True People’s History

Louis Joseph Combe and his motorcycle

Pierre Lagacé:

This one’s for you Ryan…

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

Louis Joseph  Combe is Sylvia’s father who is still living and has a lot of pictures of her family. Her daughter sent them to Robin who is in the process of scanning them all.

Louis Combe was a photographer by trade, but obviously he did not take this photo. 

Louis Joseph Combe

This is the original photo Robin had scanned two days ago.

I did a little editing just using Paint…

It was worth taking the time to do it since Robin took the time to scan 44 pictures.

I won’t be posting or editing all of them.

Only some that will be touching people’s lives so to speak.

I believe the motorcycle picture would have been taken around 1915, maybe earlier. Louis would have been 21 in 1912.

Louis Joseph Combe was born in 1891 in Custer, in South Dakota. He died in 1987.  

His father was Victor Combe…

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