Intermission – Your comments are always welcome on Our Ancestors…

An update on something I wrote on November 2, 2018…

First read the post, then read the comment that was just made at the end…


Today is All Souls Day.
This draft post was intended for publication on October 15. I wanted to write about the Sauvé family. That was before I started writing about a Ford Model T photo and people who were associated with it.

Screenshot_20181020-095904.jpg

***

I have been remembering my ancestors and yours since 2008, first in French on Nos ancêtres, and then in 2009 on this English version. I have remembered a lot more than you think because I have also honoured the Fallen in World War II.
People have been sharing so many memories, memorabilia, and photos they had of their ancestors and their relatives, even some they knew nothing about, that I felt compelled to write about them.

This comment was posted by Liza in 2014 on this blog. It was a post I had written about my maternal great-grandparents Honoré Sauvé and Julie Leroux.

Hello Pierre,
I happened to stumble across your English blog yesterday and your French blog this afternoon. I have been reading your past posts, trying to start from the beginning but reading here and there. I am pretty sure that I am a distant cousin of yours. My maternal grandfather was Osias Sauvé (1874-1954) who married Kate Welburn as his third wife both in Quebec (Namur) and Ontario (Hawkesbury or Curran) – they married three times for various reasons. In addition, my maternal grandmother was Marie Ida Evaleen Renaud who married Russell H Macklem in Windsor, Ontario, but they were originally from Quebec.

In addition, I read one of your posts about the Cloutier family, and I believe my husband, Mario Gervais, is related to several other families you mentioned. His parents are Josaphat Gervais (Gervais, Cayouette) and the late Ruth Roy (Roy, Pelletier – a grandparent was a Cloutier).

Still trying to figure out where you fit on my tree…

P.S. We live in Ottawa.

When Liza wrote this comment, I quicky began searching for her grandfather Osias Sauvé to find out how Liza and I were related. It was not that easy to find the missing link.

I was sure Osias Sauvé was the son of Honoré Sauvé (Henry Souvia) and Joséphine Parent, but I could not find Osias parents’ marriage record. I had to rely on several Canadian censuses to find his grandparents Hyacinthe Sauvé and Théotiste Sabourin in the 1852, 1861, and 1871 censuses.

This is Osias (Exloise Souvia), age 6, with his parents in the 1881 Canadian census. We see his siblings: Emma, Lora (Laura), William, Milinda, Ambrose (Ambroise), Joseph and finally Leon (Léon).

In 1896, Osias Sauvé married Marie Durocher who also went by the name Marie Desrochers. Osias’ name was also entered in several official records as Exeas, Exias, and even Elzear making it even more difficult to find all of Osias’ children.

Osias Sauvé was born on November 2, 1874 (date to be validated). He was married three times and had nine sons and nine daughters. Osias died on May 10, 1954 (date to be validated). He was 79.

Liza commented again last month about Alexandre Benoît dit Livernois…

I have some information about this family that I want to send you but I can’t seem to find your email address.

This was a great help to close the chapter on the Bennett family on Our Ancestors.

Liza had more information to share about Osias Sauvé, and together we have succeeded in finding all 18 children. This is one of Liza’s many photos she has shared last month.

Osias Sauvé is on the right, and I believe his first son Osias, born in 1897, is with him. I am sure he was not a stranger who wanted to pose for posterity with Osias Sauvé.

This is another photo from Liza’s collection.

On the left is (Cléophas) Clifford Sauvé with his brother Osias. I see some resemblance with the man on the other photo, but that’s the only hint Liza and I have.

Osias Sauvé, who is my 6th cousin once removed, had fathered 18 children and probably has hundreds if not thousands of descendants who will one day stumble across this blog, and write what Liza did in 2014…

Hello Pierre,
I happened to stumble across your English blog yesterday and your French blog this afternoon. I have been reading your past posts, trying to start from the beginning but reading here and there. I am pretty sure that I am a distant cousin of yours.

Next time on Our Ancestors, Thomas Welburn, Nellie Leggett, and their children.


Comment just made by Brenda Levert

Clifford Sauve is my grandfather.

Reflecting on Our Ancestors

As the New Year is just around the corner, the time is right to reflect on Our Ancestors.

What drives us to find our roots is probably written in our genes. This obsession to find where we come from is all too apparent with bloggers who write about genealogy. The list of bloggers is endless…

The list of your ancestors I have found since 2009 is also endless because each time someone had asked me for my help I just couldn’t resist looking for them.

Sometimes though I will reach a dead end like Wilfred Nevue…

But I still soldier on…

I know there is some force out there which is guiding us.

Michel Lauzon and I have tried very hard to find little Wilfred Nevue’s ancestors. We each have our own theory about the groom’s ancestors. Michel thinks the groom Wilfred Nevue is not Wilfrid Neveu born in Ste-Sophie in 1856 because Wilfrid Neveu is nowhere to be found after the 1861 Canadian census, and that he died at a young age.

My theory is that Wilfrid left his family when he was in his teens, and that he emigrated to Michigan. There he met Celina Delongchamp, got her pregnant, had a shotgun wedding, and after 6 months left his wife and his newborn son.

Little Wilfred became an orphan in 1896 when his mother Celina Delongchamp died. His maternal grandmother Celina Blair and her brother-in-law Maxime Delongchamp, whom she married when her husband died in 1883, adopted him. In a sense Little Wilfred was very lucky to find a loving adopted family, to be able to raise his own, and to have a descendant who still remembers him.

Thomas Welburn (1877-1954)

So much to remember in November.

Thomas Welburn was an immigrant from England. Why he emigrated to Canada I don’t know, but I will try to find out. He was born in Kirkbymoorside, in Ryedale District, in North Yorkshire, in England on Halloween Day October 31st, 1877. I have to validate his birth date, but that’s not on my to-do list for now as well as finding out why he came to Canada.

This photo was taken in 1912 in Namur, Quebec.

Thomas Welburn and Nellie Leggett’s family
Courtesy Liza Gervais

Having every little bit of information on an ancestor is not that important. But having a photo is.

This was such an amazing photo that I had to know more about it. Thomas Welburn and Nellie Leggett are on it with their first children. Children are always those who are helping me with dating pictures. This one was easy.

Little Catherine was born in 1906 and her story has never been told. Writing about people whose stories have never been told is why I have been writing so much although I will have to stop one day.

This is Catherine Welburn’s file on my Ancestry family tree even if she is not a close relative.

Catherine Welburn

Catherine Welburn is Liza Gervais’ grandmother. Liza has shared all she knew about her grandmother who married Osias Sauvé. Liza shared this 1922 photo of Catherine, Catherine’s siblings and her father Thomas Welburn.

1922_Welburn family

Thomas had lost his wife in 1921. He would go back to Ontario from Alberta, and raise his kids there. Catherine Welburn would later married Osias Sauvé, a widower.

My next series of posts will be about an immigrant from England, and his children. 

 

Your comments are always welcome on Our Ancestors…

Note

Today is All Souls Day.

This draft post was intended for publication  on October 15. I wanted to write about the Sauvé family. That was before I started writing about a Ford Model T photo and people who were associated with it.

Screenshot_20181020-095904.jpg

***

I have been remembering my ancestors and yours since 2008, first in French on Nos ancêtres, and then in 2009 on this English version. I have remembered a lot more than you think because  I have also honoured the Fallen in World War II.

People have been sharing so many memories, memorabilia, and photos they had of their ancestors and their relatives, even some they knew nothing about, that I felt compelled to write about them.

This comment was posted by Liza in 2014 on this blog. It was a post I had written about my maternal great-grandparents Honoré Sauvé and Julie Leroux.

Hello Pierre,
I happened to stumble across your English blog yesterday and your French blog this afternoon. I have been reading your past posts, trying to start from the beginning but reading here and there. I am pretty sure that I am a distant cousin of yours. My maternal grandfather was Osias Sauvé (1874-1954) who married Kate Welburn as his third wife both in Quebec (Namur) and Ontario (Hawkesbury or Curran) – they married three times for various reasons. In addition, my maternal grandmother was Marie Ida Evaleen Renaud who married Russell H Macklem in Windsor, Ontario, but they were originally from Quebec.

In addition, I read one of your posts about the Cloutier family, and I believe my husband, Mario Gervais, is related to several other families you mentioned. His parents are Josaphat Gervais (Gervais, Cayouette) and the late Ruth Roy (Roy, Pelletier – a grandparent was a Cloutier).

Still trying to figure out where you fit on my tree…

P.S. We live in Ottawa.

When Liza wrote this comment, I quicky began searching for her grandfather Osias Sauvé to find out how Liza and I were related. It was not that easy to find the missing link. 

I was sure Osias Sauvé was the son of Honoré Sauvé (Henry Souvia) and Joséphine Parent, but I could not find Osias parents’ marriage record. I had to rely on several Canadian censuses to find his grandparents Hyacinthe Sauvé and Théotiste Sabourin in the 1852, 1861, and 1871 censuses.

This is Osias (Exloise Souvia), age 6, with his parents in the 1881 Canadian census. We see his siblings: Emma, Lora (Laura), William, Milinda, Ambrose (Ambroise), Joseph and finally Leon (Léon).

 

In 1896, Osias Sauvé married Marie Durocher who also went by the name Marie Desrochers. Osias’ name was also entered in several official records as Exeas, Exias, and even Elzear making it even more difficult to find all of Osias’ children.

Osias Sauvé was born on November 2, 1874 (date to be validated). He was married three times and had nine sons and nine daughters. Osias died on May 10, 1954 (date to be validated). He was 79.

Liza commented again last month about Alexandre Benoît dit Livernois…

I have some information about this family that I want to send you but I can’t seem to find your email address.

This was a great help to close the chapter on the Bennett family on Our Ancestors.

Liza had more information to share about Osias Sauvé, and together we have succeeded in finding all 18 children. This is one of Liza’s many photos she has shared last month.

Osias Sauvé is on the right, and I believe his first son Osias, born in 1897, is with him. I am sure he was not a stranger who wanted to pose for posterity with Osias Sauvé. 

This is another photo from Liza’s collection.

On the left is (Cléophas) Clifford Sauvé with his brother Osias. I see some resemblance with the man on the other photo, but that’s the only hint Liza and I have.

Osias Sauvé, who is my 6th cousin once removed, had fathered 18 children and probably has hundreds if not thousands of descendants who will one day stumble across this blog, and write what Liza did in 2014… 

Hello Pierre,
I happened to stumble across your English blog yesterday and your French blog this afternoon. I have been reading your past posts, trying to start from the beginning but reading here and there. I am pretty sure that I am a distant cousin of yours.

Next time on Our Ancestors, Thomas Welburn, Nellie Leggett, and their children.

 

November is the month to remember

Why people remember? Mount family trees? Take pictures of headstones and share them on Find A Grave. Thousands, tens of thousands, sometimes hundreds of thousands of headstones.

Why people are sharing so much on the Internet?

November is the month to remember loved ones, even those we can’t identify on old pictures.

Screenshot_20181027-063015.jpg

All these people are now gone.

Bertha Lagasse, my grandfather’s niece, is the first one in line. I have no idea who was behind her. Next is her sister Ida Lagasse, then her brother Levi Napoleon. Next is a young lady which is still to be identified. She could well be a Dubé, or a Lamothe. Behind her I think is Henry Anthony Dubé, and behind him his sister Anna Dubé.

Henry was born in September 1901. Henry could be this little boy.

mystery family

I am almost 100% sure Eugène Dubé and my grandfather’s sister Lillie Lagasse are on this picture. They were Henry Anthony Dubé’s parents. I know this because Henry Anthony was in my family tree since 2010. Henry is also I think on several photos of Dennis Lagasse IV’s collection of old photos.

Henry Anthony Dubé

Henry is part of close to 48,000 files in my family tree. The little girl would be either Lillian or Anna. On the photo my grandaunt Lillie would be pregnant with Eva born in 1903.

This is Eva Dubé with her dear friend Marion Ellis later in life.

Screenshot_20181025-172550.jpg

I  found Eva thanks to a hint on Ancestry. Eva Dubé was married to Edgar Douglas Hamilton. I knew that, but not that she was related to Marion Ellis.

Eva Dubé

I could be wrong about Henry Anthony, about Lillian or Anna being on this photo.

But I just keep looking, sharing, and remembering.

Eva Dubé montage

 

 

 

Why?

Why I get all excited with old photos?

And why do I feel compelled to write about them?

I wish I knew…

I am not related to these people. Well maybe just a little with the little girl in front of her mother. I had to know who this family was, when and where that photo was taken.

Today is Halloween Day. The man holding her little girl Mabel was born on October 31st, 1877. His wife Nellie Leggett would die in 1921 in Alberta. Thomas Welburn would not remarry and would raise his family alone.