Revisiting some ancestors…

Call it self-control if you want.

I could have posted this last Sunday with my other post.

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I am not related at all with the people on that slideshow.

Strange isn’t?

famille Hogue vers 1910

This picture was shared with me in 2009, and it started my obsession with old pictures.

I had to know who these people were, and I had to write about them on a blog.

Write I did, and practically everyone on that picture was later identified starting with the patriarch Jean-Marie Hogue…

Jean-Marie Hogue

His son Arthur Hogue…

Arthur Hogue

His second wife on the right… and his brother Napoléon Hogue on the left…

enfants Jean-Marie Hogue

His son Adonis Hogue on his mother’s lap…

Yes, he’s a boy.

Corinne, Jean-Marie’s daughter, with her two hands on her lap…

I could go on and on, and bore you to death about this extended family seen on a wedding picture taken on April 14,1909, in Malborough, Massachusetts, but I won’t.

Call it self-control if you want.


Jean-Marie Hogue, a French-Canadian, emigrated to the U.S., and worked most of his life in a shoe factory.


1870 census John Hogue

I’ll be 84…

I’ll be turning 84 next December…


Pierre 1949

Little old moi in 1949


2032, that’s still a long way to go before  I  can get my hand on an old picture of Henriette Alexandre, my great-grandmother.

Call it an obsession  if you  want.

I have been  blessed  so far by distant  relatives who have been sharing  their  precious  old pictures with me, and allowed  me to share  them with you since 2009.

Paul-Émile Chaumont

two albums of Paul-Émile Chaumont

These are the first two pictures I posted on this blog in September 2009. I am not the man seen here on this picture.

Paul-Émile Chaumont

How I met Paul-Émile Chaumont is how I came to meet all those who have been sharing their pictures and their stories with me since then.

Call it obsession is you want…

Did you know?

Did  you  know I have more than 34,000 individual  files on my private  Ancestry  tree I started back in 2009 after migrating my Gedcom from My Heritage to Ancestry?

family tree

Did  you  know I have more than 5,000 pictures on my private tree on Ancestry?

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Did  you  know I have written more than 900 posts  on this blog, and even more on its French version Nos ancêtres?

Did  you  know I have more than one blog?

Did  you  know I always  reply  to requests people send me?

Did  you  know no money  is involved in all of this? No DNA testing also.

Did  you  know I am still waiting  for David  Victor  Lagasse’s  old pictures he promised he would send last month? Or is it two months ago?

Did  you  know how  patient  I can be?

Did  you  know this  was  one of the  first  pictures I posted on this blog, and the person who sent it never wrote back never giving an explanation?

East Bristol 1916

He has to be crazy to look for dead people, and inventing captions…

Has been on my to-do list…



Bill Bigelow taught high school social studies in Portland, Ore. for almost 30 years. He is the curriculum editor of “Rethinking Schools” and the co-director of the Zinn Education Project. This project offers free materials to teach people’s history and an “If We Knew Our History” article series. Bigelow is author or co-editor of numerous books, including “A People’s History” for the Classroom and “The Line Between Us: Teaching About the Border and Mexican Immigration”.

“For years, I opened my 11th-grade U.S. history classes by asking students, “What’s the name of that guy they say discovered America?” A few students might object to the word “discover,” but they all knew the fellow I was talking about, “Christopher Columbus!”, several called out in unison.

“Right. So who did he find when he came here?” I asked. Usually, a few students would say, “Indians,” but I asked them to be specific: “Which nationality? What are their names?”


In more than 30 years of teaching U.S. history and guest-teaching in others’ classes, I’ve never had a single student say, “Taínos.” So I ask them to think about that fact. “How do we explain that? We all know the name of the man who came here from Europe, but none of us knows the name of the people who were here first—and there were hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of them. Why haven’t you heard of them?”


This ignorance is an artifact of historical silencing—rendering invisible the lives and stories of entire peoples. It’s what educators began addressing in earnest 20 years ago, during plans for the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival in the Americas, which at the time the boasted would be “the most stupendous international celebration in the history of notable celebrations.” Native American and social justice activists, along with educators of conscience, pledged to interrupt the festivities.” The full story Rethinking Columbus: Towards a True People’s History


You’ve got to be curious  when you visit  a cemetery because  each  headstone  tells a story.


This  is another  picture  taken  on my journey to Stanbridge-East in 2008.

Dead end!

No known  ancestors.

But  that  didn’t  deter me from  visiting  more and more  cemeteries  with distant  cousin Joe when we found  each other on the Internet back in 2010 if I  remember  correctly.

This  is  the document  that led  me to Joe.



You should be if you found  me by reading this  blog or by sending  a message  to a complete  stranger on Ancestry.


Israël  and Olive

Cassandra should be, but not enough to read all the posts written on this blog.

This is post no. 865.

Reading all my posts would indeed be a sure sign of addiction to genealogy.

What about this small picture?



If you are addicted to Our Ancestors, I am sure you will come back later.

As a footnote, Cassandra, I  sent  you  an  invitation  to view  Robert’s private  family  tree. Check  your  inbox!

Hard to believe?

André Mignier first ancestor

What about this clue I found on the Internet among the other clues? Is it valid information or just information copied from someone’s else research?

One clue tells all!

Michel Mignier born around 1610 died in 1727!

117 years old!

Suspicious enough not to trust everything I found yesterday in my search for George Lagasse who married Albertine Deschênes.

I have learned not to trust everything I find on the Internet, or people who say they know it all. Having been hooked on genealogy since 2007 because of old pictures like this one…

Honoré Sauvé et Julie Leroux

I have learned more than just who were my ancestors. Always check first, then check again, and again.

This being said…

This information seems valid though.

Napoléon Lagacé

I can corroborate this information with this.

1901 Joseph L Lagassé

Joseph L. Lagassé’s family is seen here. Joseph’s wife is Ellen Lagassé who was in fact Helen Grant whose daughter was Anna Ellen Lagassé born in 1900 whose real name was…

record-image (28)

Mrs. Lejeune was the mid-wife.

In 1901, Joseph was a carpenter. Ernest Thibeault was a lodger, and I suspect he was related somewhat to Joseph’s first wife Marie Thibault, Napoléon’s mother.

Napoléon Lagacé

Marie Thibault probably died when she gave birth to Marie Julia in 1896.

Joseph Lagace

Joseph had to remarry, and he found a new wife living not far from where he lived…

1891 James Grant

About André Mignier…

This is my file on him.

 Pierre André Mignier dit La Gâchette

 I hope you trust me when I write something on Our Ancestors.