A Time to Remember William H Ritchie – Redux

I did not expect this when Serge Ritchie wrote me about a message he got on Ancestry.

He thought it would be important to transfer it.

Salut.! Pierre

Sujet:
Sgt William H. Ritchie….je pense bien que c’est le fils de Frank
Ritchie & Odna Lagasse…..

Un message sur Ancestry, je trouvais cela important que je te transfère
ce message, parce que tu es celui qui a fait un travail remarquable, en
plus je ne parle pas vraiment anglais, cet honneur te revient, tu pourras
peut-être communiquer avec eux….

Bonne journée.! Pierre….

Si tu peux, tu m`en donneras des nouvelles….

Serge

If you can read French then you can feel how Serge was excited about all this.

Ditto…

Original post

One of William H Ritchie’s nephew had sent a picture of Robert J Ritchie to a memorial site about SS-332 Bullhead.

Robert J Ritchie

His name was beside the picture.

I wanted to get in touch so I could get a picture of William who died in Holland on September 22, 1944, and be able to pay homage to Robert’s brother. 

With this piece of information I went ahead and used Facebook to look for him.

Piece of cake…

I found him on the first try. It was easy because he had some Ritchies as friends.

So I sent him a message…

Paul replied and he invited me as a friend.

Paul did not know at that time that I was his second cousin once removed. I broke the news.

He is just getting to know me. I told him I knew quite a lot about his mother’s ancestors who once lived in Quebec back in 1800s.

While browsing a little on his Facebook page, I came across this…

William or Bill is on the left and Robert is on the right.

Now I can pay homage to William just like I did for Robert who is on eternal patrol.

A site has already done this. Click here.

William H Ritchie died in Holland on September 22, 1944.

If you want to learn more about Sergeant William H Ritchie, U.S. Army Service, # 31271954, 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, you can visit this site about Operation Market Garden.

This site pays homage to all those who participated in that operation.

Sergeant William Ritchie was in a glider regiment. He was in Company G.

You can go from there.

You have a lot to learn about Operation Market Garden.

As a footnote, I found these pictures on the Internet.

We see members of the 327th Glider Infantry Regiment. Both were taken in Eindhoven.

This other photo struck me.

I think I recognize William Ritchie on the right…

But I could be wrong just like I could be wrong with this picture that started all this…

Odna Lagasse?

Does it really matter?

No it doesn’t.

As a footnote, these notes taken on this Website

Operation Market Garden
MARKET-GARDEN was planned as a two phase operation. Operation MARKET was the airborne phase of the assault, with Operation GARDEN being the ground attack. The paratroopers of First Allied Airborne Army were to jump into the Netherlands and secure a corridor from Eindhoven north to Arnhem, through which the ground forces of the British 30 Corps could advance and push on to the IJesselmer (Zuider Zee). The eventual goal was to cross the Rhine River and breach the German West Wall defenses. The Dutch countryside, criss-crossed by innumerable dikes, drainage ditches, rivers, and canals, however, would prove difficult to traverse if the ground troops could not advance by road. For the plan to be a success the paratroopers had to keep the roadway open and the bridges along the route intact and secure.

D-Day was set for 17 September 1944, and the 101st, along with the 82d Airborne Division, the British 1st Airborne Division and 52d Lowland Division (Airportable), and the 1st Polish Parachute Brigade were set to jump. Unlike the Normandy jumps, this operation, by order of Lt. Gen. Lewis H. Brereton, (picture right) commander of the First Allied Airborne Army, was to be carried out in daylight. Shortages in transport planes, however, prevented the three divisions from dropping all their troops on D-Day, and the commanders had to decide which units would go in first. The 101st Airborne Division was to anchor the British Airborne Corps’ southern-most flank and secure a 15-mile sector between Eindhoven and Veghel. Taking this into consideration, General Taylor decided that the three parachute infantry regiments would jump on the 17 September. The 327th Glider Infantry was to arrive on D+1, and the artillery units were scheduled for D+2, the 19th.

The planes carrying the 101st encountered heavy antiaircraft fire as they approached their targets, but the pilots were able to hold formation, and the paratroopers, for the most part, were delivered to the correct drop zones. These were located to the west of the main highway and in the center of the division’s sector, near the villages of Zon, St. Oedenrode, and Best. The 506th Parachute Infantry dropped near Zon, with the mission of securing the highway bridge over the Wilhelmina Canal, south of the village. Once the bridge was secure the regiment was to advance further south and seize Eindhoven. The 502d’s zone was north of the 506th, and its mission was to guard both regiments’ drop zones for later use by the gliders. It was also to capture the road bridge over the Dommel River at St. Oedenrode. Additionally, General Taylor ordered the regiment to dispatch a company to the south of Best to capture the bridges there that crossed the Wilhelmina Canal. The 501st Parachute Infantry jumped north of the 502d, near the town of Veghel. Elements of the regiment were to gain control of the rail and road bridges over the Willems Canal and the Aa River.

The 501st accomplished its mission, capturing Veghel and the surrounding bridges against only limited enemy resistance. The 502d also completed its main assignment of securing St. Oedenrode and the bridge over the Dommel River. The company that had moved south of Best, however, had great difficulty and could not take the bridges over the Wilhelmina Canal. The 2d and 3d Battalions, 506th PIR, methodically cleared Zon, while the 1st Battalion, accompanied by General Taylor, moved around the village to the south to seize the bridge crossing the Wilhelmina Canal. The progress of the battalions in the village was slow, but enemy fire stopped the 1st Battalion completely as it approached the bridge. When the two battalions emerged from Zon and the 1st Battalion also appeared to advance, the Germans blew the bridge.

Elements of the 506th managed to cross the river, neutralizing the enemy force that had destroyed the bridge, and a footbridge was improvised to allow the remainder of the 506th to cross. The following day the regiment liberated Eindhoven, clearing the enemy from the town. The local citizens were ecstatic, and that evening when the Guards Armoured Division, the spearhead of the British 30 Corps’ Operation GARDEN, passed through the town, it was like a carnival. British engineers replaced the blown bridge over the canal, and the ground forces continued north. With the exception of the bridges south of Best, the division had achieved all its D-Day objectives. The next mission was to hold what it had taken and keep Hell’s Highway, as the road north became known, open despite German counterattacks.

In the days following the link between the airborne and ground forces the 101st, now in defensive positions, faced enemy counterattacks as the Germans attempted to cut the road and stop the flow of Allied forces north. General Taylor received information that the Germans were planning a large scale offensive, coming from both the east and west sides of the road in the vicinity of Veghel and Uden, to the northeast. Ordered to Uden on 22 September, elements of the 506th arrived to defend the village moments ahead of the Germans, but the main assault came at Veghel.

Taylor dispatched the 327th Glider Infantry to reinforce the 2d Battalion, 501st PIR, at Veghel when he received intelligence about the attack. As luck would have it, General McAuliffe was also in Veghel on the 22d. He had been searching for a new division command post when the word came, and General Taylor gave his artillery commander responsibility for the defense of the town.

The SCREAMING EAGLES turned back the first attack on Veghel, which came from the village of Erp to the east. The Germans, however, swung to the northwest and cut the highway between Veghel and Uden, then turning south, the enemy force attacked. As the German armored column approached Veghel, McAuliffe ordered an antitank gun brought up, and although there is debate over which unit fired, the American defenders knocked out the lead tank, and the enemy column turned back. Additional battalions of the 327th arrived, as did other elements of the 506th, along with British tank squadrons. The enemy continued attacking Veghel through the afternoon, including several heavy artillery bombardments, but McAuliffe and his forces held. The next important step was to reopen the highway; men and equipment badly needed further north were backing up on the closed road.

The British 30 Corps commander Lt. Gen. Brian Horrocks, agreed to send the 32d Guards Brigade back south on 23 September to help reopen the road. At the same McAuliffe sent two battalions of the 506th north to confront the enemy position on the highway. When the American soldiers arrived they found that most of the Germans had withdrawn. The 101st soldiers cleared the remaining opposition and proceeded northeast towards Uden, where they met the British tankers. Hell’s Highway was open for business once again.

The Germans continued their attack on Veghel the following day, but to no avail. They did, however, cut the road once again, this time near the village of Koevering, between Veghel and St. Oedenrode. On 25 September elements of the 506th, ordered south from Uden, the 1st Battalion, 502d PIR, and units of the British 50th Division, moving north from St. Oedenrode, enveloped the enemy position on the road. During the night, after mining the road, the Germans withdrew. The following day Allied engineers were called in to clear the road of mines, and the highway was open once again. While the enemy continued to harass the SCREAMING EAGLES along their sector of Hell’s Highway, the division’s positions remained intact and kept the road open. Allied operations had forced the Germans to spend precious resources on the defense of the Netherlands. Although MARKET-GARDEN did not achieve its original goals, successes in Holland provided the Allies with a foothold from which to launch future drives.

In early October the British moved their 8 and 12 Corps into position along the highway, and it was thought the 101st could be better used elsewhere. On 5 October the division moved north to take up defensive positions in the British line, in an area known as the island. This area, a narrow strip of land north of Nijmegen, situated between the lower Rhine and Waal Rivers, was subjected to numerous German attacks. The division suffered heavy casualties in defense of this “island”. Shortly after the 101st assumed its positions in the line, the British Corps returned, without either of its American divisions, to England. The 82d joined the 101st on the island later in October. It was not until November that the two divisions were released to prepare for the next airborne mission. The 101st, in late November, moved back to Mourmelon, France, for a well-deserved rest. There the men of the 101st received replacement equipment and new clothes and trained for the next jump. Events in the Ardennes forest, however, interrupted their rest, and the next jump never came.

For a good overview of Operation Market Garden…

 

End of the original post

Dear Pierre,

Thank you very much for your email.
I checked out you blog and I was stunned bye the research you did on those 2 heroes.
You did a great job. We would love to use some of the information and pictures on our database.
As you can see on our database, we dont have a lot of information on Ritchie, William H,  so everything you would like to share, will be a wondeful contribution for his memorial page.
We look forward to hear from you again,
Sincerely,
Jasper van Haren

Fields of Honor – Database
www.fieldsofhonor-database.com

Stichting Verenigde Adoptanten Amerikaanse Oorlogsgraven / Foundation United Adopters American War Graves
www.adoptiegraven.nl

Agnes Lagaser – Wife of Leon Saucier – Redux

This is what started this never-ending story.

I am reposting it because someone answered my call for the headstones she posted on Find A Grave.

Lisa took those pictures and she allowed me to post them on the blog.

 

Collection Lisa H.

She took those pictures in Mount Calvary Cemetery, a cemetery in New Hampshire.

Click here for a virtual visit.

These pictures were a great help in finding Irene’s ancestors and descendants.

Irene Wilcox

Collection Jason West

Irene was the daughter of Adélard or Théodore Turcotte who changed his name to Wilcox. I don’t know why Adélard Turcotte used that name since it does not sound a bit like Turcotte.

Maybe it does if you say Turcotte fast enough.

This being said, start reading the old post I wrote back in December when I first contacted Jason, and make sense of all this.

Original post

My blog is really like a TV Reality Show.

I seldom plan anything in advance as I start writing about something I found about your ancestors or mine.

You have to trust me on this.

Trust is everything in life.

This was the first headstone my third cousin Joe saw entering St. Joseph Church Cemetery in Bristol, Connecticut. 

Photo5237

Collection Pierre Lagacé

Honest to God!

I had not noticed that headstone at first.

Agnes Lagasse

We were just going there to find French-Canadian names on headstones which is our favorite pastime.

The name Agnes Lagaser on that headstone sounded familiar. Could it be a long lost relative of mine?

So back at Joe’s place we looked for Leon Saucier in the 1900 U.S. Census.

Lo and behold!

1900 Leon Saucier family

1900 U.S. Census

Leon Saucier was there with Agnes and her two sons, Arthur Myers and Henry Myers. Olive Saucier, most probably Leon’s daughter he had with his first wife, was also part of that family.

1900 Saucier family

A whole bunch of Lagasses lived also in the same neighborhood. 

Just trust me on this.

My great-grandfather Dennis Lagasse II with Henriette Alexandre, Harriet in the 1900 census, were there with my grandfather Leo, 11 years old, at school, and his brother Adélard (Adlore) working at New Departure in the electro plating department.

famille Lagacé 1900

But getting back to the Saucier family…

Back from my genealogical expedition in Connecticut, I was able to find more information on one of Agnes’s son: Arthur Joseph Myers’ marriage with Eva Rock in 1915.

marriage Myers Rock

This new artefact opened up a new door…

Pique by curiosity, I just had to peek inside.

End of the original post

I hope this helped you a little about what is going to follow next time.

How I met my great-grandfather’s sister?

That would be a great sequel to How I met my great-grandfather?

the Alexandre Family

Philomène Lagacé, Philomene Lagasse, Libbie…

That’s the title of the post I wrote back in 2010 when Joe and I got to know each other well. Joe is a third cousin also addicted to genealogy. Joe did not have that old tintype picture you see on top. Someone else had it and scanned it.

People who stumble on this blog are probably wondering why someone would write about his ancestors or other people’s ancestors on a blog.

This is a post I wrote back in 2010 about…

Philomène Lagacé, Philomene Lagasse, Libbie…

I know I should be talking about my great-grandfather Stanislas Lagasse this morning… but Joe gave me a lot of information on Stanislas’ sister Philomène.

Her nickname was Libbie.

That’s a catchy nickname.

Joe sent me this obituary…


Philomene LAGASSE

Death (12 March 1920):

BRISTOL PRESS

13 March 1920

Mrs. Libbie Alexander widow of the late John Alexander died at the home of her son David Alexander 149 Park St. last evening as a result of complications due to old age.

She had been an invalid for several years. Mrs. Alexander was born in Quebec, Canada 79 years ago. She spent her early years there. She was married in 1869 to John Alexander. They moved to the state and lived for some time in North Adams, Mass. They came to Bristol twenty six years ago and made their home here. Mr. Alexander died in 1914.

Mrs. Alexander is survived by four daughters: Mrs. David Bleau, Mrs. William Archambeault and Miss Mary Alexander of Bristol and Mrs. Phoebe Lustrich of Brooklyn, NY. By three sons: John, David, and Peter Alexander all of Bristol, and by many grand children and great grand children. She was one of the well known French residents and was a member of St. Ann’s Church. The funeral will be held at St. Ann’s Church at 9 o’clock Monday morning. Rev. Joseph P. Perreault will conduct the services.

The only thing I had on her was this…

1852
Notre-Dame de Stanbridge

36 Lagasse, Dennis Farmer Canada F Roman Catholic 37 M
37 Lagasse, Elizabeth Canada F Roman Catholic 30 F
38 Lagasse, Philomel Canada F Roman Catholic 12 F
39 Lagasse, Dennis Canada F Roman Catholic 11 M
40 Lagasse, Peter Canada F Roman Catholic 7 M
41 Lagasse, Almira Canada F Roman Catholic 5 F
42 Lagasse, Joseph Canada F Roman Catholic 3 M
43 Lagasse, Agnes Canada F Roman Catholic 1 F

1861

Name: Philemon Lagassy
Gender: Female
Census place: Stanbridge, Missisquoi, Quebec
Age in years: 20
Estimated birth year: 1841
Birthplace: B C
Marital status: Single
Religion: R C
Sheet number: 324
Line number: 5
Film number: 517397
Library and Archives Canada film number: C-1297
Digital GS number: 4108794
Image number: 216
Collection: Quebec Census, 1861

That was not much…

Now I have her picture and the picture of her daughters.

End of the post…

Little did I know back in 2010 that someone living on the West Coast had more than 100 old pictures from her husband’s family with some pictures of Libbie and some of her daughters’ descendants.

The floodgates opened wide!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I could go on and on and on with all these sequels, but I think you get the picture.

If you don’t,  well you just have to read this blog from the start.

Dennis Lagasse… Who do you think you are? Redux

I like to take a trip down memory lane sometimes on this blog, and reflect upon what I have been writing since 2009.

This post was written on October 16, 2011.

That’s when Dennis wrote me again and I got excited all over again.

Start reading the post…

Sometimes I think I scare people away with my passion for genealogy. I hope I won’t scare Dennis away.

If you pass the test and you are not afraid, then you are in for a big surprise…

I am a very serious person and I am very respectful of others. Joe and Sandy know that because they met me in person last month. And they were not scared a wee bit…

So… 

Dennis Lagasse…

Who do you think you are?

Dennis is a direct descendant of Dennis 1816, Dennis 1842 and Dennis 1864… He lives in Connecticut where these Dennises are buried.

Dennis put a comment on my blog about genealogy this week…

I don’t think I scared him away because he sent me this e-mail… when I first replied to his comment.

Hello Pierre,

I just talked to my dad… and he’s sending me a copy of the pictures he has of his grandfather Dennis Lagasse with his 12 kids and wife Amanda on their front porch in Bristol CT. He also read to me the Bristol Press newspaper article where it describes the accident that killed Dennis in 1922, he is copying and sending me that also. It’s so exciting for me to see all this history coming together, I live in… CT and am only an hour away from Bristol and would love to help you in any way I can.

Thank you so much for all the wonderful work you’ve done so far.

Dennis Lagasse

His great-grandfather was Dennis Lagasse who died in 1922.

Dennis knows that part.

He was married to Amanda Ménard and they had 12 children.

Dennis knows that part also.

Dennis’ great-great-grandfather was also named Dennis. I don’t know if Dennis knew this.

This Dennis Lagasse whose real name was Stanislas Lagacé was born 9 August 1842 in Henryville, in Quebec.

He died on June 5th 1927.

He was 84.

He worked all of his life.

His father, who was also named Stanislas (Dennis), died in 1900.
This is his death certificate that Sandy found for me.

He was 84.

He was born in 1816.

He worked all of his life.

He lived at 22 Conlon Street in Bristol, Connecticut.

So Dennis…

Who do you think you are?

Someone who will want to know more about his roots back to the first ancestor… 

André Mignier.

He was a soldier who came with the Carignan-Salières regiment.

Stop reading…

Why am I retelling all this?

Just to say I don’t write this blog after all, people who write me do, and anything they share is important, even pictures of ashtrays.

Levi ashtray 2

Now if someone related to Aldéi could contact me and tell me he or she has old pictures like Dennis had, I will start to get all excited again.

The Chaumonts revisited Redux

I just got notified that Seeburn is now following my blog.

You owe a lot to Seeburn. I will edit this post I wrote a long time ago using ( parentheses) along the way.

This was the first article written on this blog.

This was the second…

This is the 227th (651st).

I wrote articles about some others families…

the Alexandre family

the Archambeault family

the Belisle family

the Bleau family

the Brière family

(the Cayo family)

(the Cadieux family)

the Charbonneau family

the Combe family

the Depatie family

(the Dube family)

the Dubois family

the Hogue family

the Lagacé family

the Lagasse family

the LeGacy family

the Lesperance family

the Lestage family

(the La Gase family)

the Moreau family

(the Maynard family)

(the Myers family)

the Quesnel family

the Robitaille family

the Sauvé family

the Terrien family

Sometimes comments get lost on this blog because people don’t read them.

This is the comment I received yesterday from someone in Louisiana I believe.

ref: Prairie Soileau

Pierre:

GREAT ARTICLE : we can share HONOR my FAMILY and the MEMORY of my ANCESTORS, GREAT PEOPLE who SACRIFICED so and paved the way for me and my FAMILY

Seeburn Chaumont

This is exactly the reason why I started writing this blog in the first place…

So we can share HONOR our FAMILIES and the MEMORY of our ANCESTORS, GREAT PEOPLE who SACRIFICED so and paved the way for us and our FAMILIES

Have a nice day.

Dennis Lagasse III and his five sons around 1920

The whole family around 1915…

(At that time I could not identify all the young women, but thanks to comments I have received since I posted this 227th article, I have been able to do so…

If I am writing this, it’s just my way of saying hello to Seeburn who lived in Louisiana and whom I never met personally.)

Have a nice day.

Alyce, Sweet Alyce: Redux

Not another redux post again!

Don’t worry, I won’t post more than one post a week for the time being on this blog. I don’t want to confuse you with the Cayos from Wisconsin. I wrote this post before Steve Myers found out all about Chrétien Lemaire who deserted his post in 1780. Steve added this interesting comment yesterday.

I can’t say I’m surprised he deserted. We Myers’ have always been too independent for our own good!

Steve Myers has some catching up to do on this blog, but I don’t want him to read all the 629 posts I wrote since September 2009. At first I was a little bit afraid that I might have scared him away from all this research I have done on his Myers ancestors.

This post was to have been sort of a starter so Steve would have known that I am not a crazy Canuck hooked on genealogy who is trying to find rich relatives in the U.S. or sell him coffee mugs with his ancestors’ coat-of-arms.

coat of arms 1

This was the story I wrote of Alyce LaGasse’s quest for her ancestors. I wrote it in 2010. The story is quite amazing and I am still pinching myself when I think about it. Alyce is also pinching herself and she is sometimes flummoxed by all the research I have done.

Alyce was the first distant cousin in the U.S. to find me. Strangely enough Alyce is also a third cousin once removed like Steve, and she is not scared a bit.

Start reading Alyce Sweet Alyce…

This is no horror story…

In fact I don’t like watching horror movies. “Sweet Alice”, that’s what I called her, reminded of something so I checked on the Internet just to be sure.You find a lot of things on the Internet… like my blog on genealogy.

Alyce has won the jackpot and she won big.

Aly1

In my search for descendants of my great-great-grandfather Stanislas Lagacé, I had found a brother, Pierre Lagacé, who had married Marcelline David. Tammy Middleton and Alyce LaGasse were the only two persons to ask for help in finding their roots. Pierre Lagacé, born in 1825, was their common ancestor. Tammy was looking for family ties with this unknown chef.

1126emeril2

Alyce is the granddaughter of Idala Lagacé who was also known as Idala Lagassé, Idala Lagossi and Idola Lagasse. Both Idala and Ambroise were Pierre Lagacé’s and Marcelline David’s sons. Idala was Alyce’s grandfather and Ambroise was Tammy’s children’s great-great-grandfather.

Tammy never returned my e-mails, but Alyce was all excited.

Oh my goodness… what a surprise to find a follow-up – yes, even if I discovered this 6 months later and the post was . . . 10 years ago. My interest is renewed – I do have relatives somewhere! Yes, as per your blog, I am alive :) 🙂 and would love to know more.

Please!

Pierre Lagacé (we share the same given name) married Marcelline David on February 4, 1850 in Notre-Dame-des-Anges church in Notre-Dame-de-Stanbridge, a small picturesque village in Missisquoi county just north of Lake Champlain.

Notre-Dame-des-Anges Church built in 1893

I knew all about Idala Lagasse with the help of parish records and censuses. It was so easy to find Alyce’s ancestors.

1871 Canadian Census

Name: Idola Lagassé
Gender: Male
Age in years: 1
Estimated birth year: 1870
Birthplace: Quebec
Marital status:
Origin (Ancestry): Francaise
Religion: Catholique
Census place: 02, Stanbridge i, Missisquoi 125, Quebec

1901 Canadian Census

Farmer

Lagossi Idala     M Head          M  Mar 1     1870     31
Lagossi Albina     F Wife          M  Mar 24     1872     29
Lagossi Rose     F Daughter    S  Jan 1     1894     7
Lagossi Parmilias     F Daughter    S  Dec 3     1894     6

1920 U.S. Census

Name: Idala A Lagasse
Residence: Part Of Precinct 9 New Bedford Part Of Ward 3, Bristol, Massachusetts
Estimated birth year: 1871
Age in years: 49
Birthplace: Canada
Relationship to head-of-household: Self
Gender: Male
Race or color (on document): White
Marital status: Widowed

But I had no pictures to show her! Alyce told me she had a picture of Idala with his sons. I just couldn’t wait to see how he looked.

stop

Back in 2010, Alyce LaGasse knew nothing about her Lagacé roots. She started looking for old pictures she once thought throwing away in the garbage. She looked and looked and looked. And Alyce found them and shared everything so other descendants of Idala Lagasse might one day find this blog and see how their ancestors looked like.

Idala 1930

Idala Lagasse

Identification of Idala's sons

Idala’s five sons

band of brothers

Idala’s five sons

Idola & Fils012

Idala and four of his five sons

So now Steve, you should know me better. I wish I had a beautiful picture of the church where Julien Myers and Agnès Lagacé were married on July 13, 1869 instead of this one built in 1893.

Stanbridge 2008 062

I would have wished you had old pictures of people you know nothing about. I would have been a great help in finding who was who.

Merry Christmas Redux

I just got curious and I had to look at what I wrote last year for Christmas. Who in his or her right mind would click on all the links on that post?

Who in his or her right mind would write that much on other people’s ancestors? I am sure all these people I found along the way searching for my roots would understand, and I am sure they don’t read all that I wrote on this blog.

You don’t have to.

image001Merry Christmas

Alyce LaGasse where ever you are right now…

Peter Smith where ever you are right now between Asia and Little Snoring…

George Stewart in Hamilton.

Thinkingshift somewhere between NZ and God only knows…

Koji in beautiful sunny Hawaii…

Pacificparatropper in South Florida

Chatter Blog…

Paul D. and La Wanda in NC… 

Joe T. and Lise in Connecticut…

Frank Archambeault in Connecticut…

Sandy L. in Massachusetts…

Robin on the West Coast…

James in Memphis, Tennessee…

Ron Depatie in Ontario who is still addicted to this blog… and wants to know about some of his maternal ancestors…

Marylin Lagasse in Alberta I guess…

Seeburn Chaumont and Pinkie from Louisiana…

Susan…

Fran…

Doris

Marianne…

Dennis IV and his father Lionel…

And a whole lot more people who will make 2014 another great year… ancestors wise.

image002

And a very Merry Christmas to Judy Giguere in Connecticut…

Merry Christmas to all my readers… and my friends…

and to those who will still grieve so much during Christmas time.

Who do you think you are…? Redux

Redux time again!

I know you just can’t wait.

So do I. This is one of my favorite posts.

Start reading…

I know some people get all excited when they discover their Lagacé lineage.

They immediately connect to Emeril Lagasse.

I don’t mind that at all.

When the excitement is all over, then they start digging deeper and then they find there is so much more to learn about their roots than being a distant relative to Emeril Lagasse.

I did not know who Emeril Lagasse was before I started searching for my ancestor André Mignier back in 2007.

So let’s say I discovered Emeril Lagasse after I discovered everything about the Lagacés, and the Lagasses, and the LeGasse, and the LeGacy, and… so on and so on…

Emeril Lagasse is my 8th cousin meaning our common ancestors were brothers 8 generation back.

Bam

So…

Who do you think you are…?

In a way, just someone extraordinary like celebrities are.

Like Idala Lagasse who is a celebrity to his descendants…

Idala 1930

Idala Lagasse

And of course yourself when you will become your descendants’ ancestor.

That what I think you are…

Stop!

stop

That’s stop in French.

I just found a new third cousin once removed. His ancestor was Agnes Lagasse.

Photo5205

His  great-great-grandmother was resting in peace since July 5th 1901 in St. Joseph Church cemetery until Joe found her headstone while I was looking all around for French Canadian names.

To be continued…

(Another) Canadien in the American Civil War: Cyprien Racine Becomes George Root

Reblogged from this blog.

Excerpt

In an earlier post I told the story of Philibert Racine alias Philip F. Root. Philibert was a Canadien veteran of the Civil War and the brother of two of my great-great-grandmothers. He served with the First Vermont Battery Light Artillery that saw action in the Red River campaign in Louisiana.

I mentioned in that post that Philibert reportedly had a brother who called himself George S. Root who served in this same unit in the Civil War. I surmised that “George” was an alias for Cyprien Racine, baptized May 30, 1843 at Saint-Damase-de-Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec. I believe that I can now confirm the theory that George S. Root was Cyprien.

A Canadien in the American Civil War

Reblogged from here…

Excerpt

Many Canadiens fought in both the Revolutionary War and the American Civil War. Estimates for the number of Canadiens who fought in the latter conflict range as high as 20,000. A love of adventure and the desire for employment seems to have been the main motives for these very young men who heard the calls to arms in the 1860s.

Philibert Racine, the brother of two of my great-great-grandmothers (my grandparents were second cousins) was among these Canadien veterans of the Civil War. Philibert was born on June 20, 1845, and baptized at Saint-Pie, Bagot County, Québec (known as “Lower Canada” at the time).  Following his father Prudent Racine’s involvement in the Patriotes War of 1837 (see previous post) the Racines lived briefly in Vermont before returning to the Eastern Townships region of Québec in the early 1850s where they settled eventually  at Roxton Falls.

Blog of David Vermette, dormant since 2012…