Old pictures and my 5th cousin once removed

Old pictures sometimes are the only thing left to remember people by…

Or headstones…

Or Memorial Websites

Or a 94 year-old veteran who remembers the Fallen.

Gordon Hill remembered his old friend Larry Legace with pictures he kept all these years. First, with a picture taken at No.5 ITS (Initial Training School) Belleville, Ontario…

No.5 ITS Belleville, Ontario

Next, with a group picture taken later at No.4 EFTS Windsor Mills, Quebec in the summer of 42…

No.4 EFTS Windsor Mills, Quebec

Finally with a group picture taken at No.13 SFTS St. Hubert, Quebec…

SFTS St. Hubert

No.13 SFTS St. Hubert, Quebec

St-Hubert SFTS No 65 course

Colorised version

This photo of Larry was found on Ancestry’s Website.

Larry Legace real name was Lawrence Ferdinand Legace. His record of service is available for everyone to look at. Probably no one is looking for Lawrence since he never had any descendants…

Unless he fathered a child during the war…

Gordon Hill lost track of his old friend after they trained together at St. Hubert. He did not know that his friend had died in World War Two. When I found out, I told Clarence Simonsen who met “Gord” several times to write his memoirs to go easy when he would be telling him that his old friend had died.

Lawrence was on his 10th operation or trip as indicated on this confidential report dated 22 January, 1944.

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Lawrence had become an Avro Lancaster Mark II pilot with RCAF 432 Squadron.

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Avro Lancaster Mark II
Source Internet

Lancaster II

Avro Lancaster Mark II
Source Internet

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Larry’s Record of Service card

After January 22, 1944, Lawrence became just a name on official documents for someone to read and file away.

First on a casualty inquiry dated 14 January, 1946…

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Then a first investigation report dated 15 June, 1946…

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burial report

Finally this one which is dated 12 March, 1948…

Not very pretty to read I warn you.

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This is Lawrence’s final resting place…

 

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Epilogue…

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Poem

Eventually
All things decline
Everything falters, dies and ends
Towers cave in, walls collapse
Roses wither, horses stumble
Cloth grows old, men expire
Iron rusts and timber rots away
Nothing made by hand will last
I understand the truth
That all must die, both clerk and lay
And the fame of men now dead
Will quickly be forgotten
Unless the clerk takes up his pen
And brings their deeds to life again.

Poem written possibly by Wace.

Click here for more on him.

My friend John posted that poem on his blog. This is what will lead me eventually to write about Lawrence Legace, a 5th cousin once removed, on November 11.

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Green-Wood Cemetery Where Ancestors Await You

About a cemetery…

Moore Genealogy

 

Record book from Green-Wood Cemetery.
Courtesy of Green-Wood Cemetery.

Last spring I was reading my local newspaper when an article caught my eye. It was regarding a cemetery in New York City that has compiled over 160 biographies of people who served during World War 1 and that are buried there. They even put this on their website for anyone to look up. The cemetery is Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, and they put these biographies online in time for the 100th anniversary of the United States entry into World War 1. I immediately went to their website to check this out and found a vast resource for genealogy research. I spent hours looking over their website. I discovered that in addition to the World War 1 biographies they had done the same with their Civil War veterans. They even have an online magazine called “the Arch.” In the current…

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Alexina – Post 1230

Alexina Brault or Breault was Elmire’s niece.

This screen capture shows you how add Father, add Mother, add RELATIVES will lead you if you are not careful.

If I remember correctly it was Fran who had shared this photo of Alexina Brault and Zéphyr Choinière.

They had four children. At least that’s how many I found.

No one got married at least I found no wedding photos…

Fran had also shared these two photos. The first one is Albert George Choinière and Alice Louise Alexandre’s wedding picture.

Albert George Choinière and Alice Louise Alexandre

This one with the best man and the bridesmaid.

The best man looked familiar as well as the bridesmaid.

Next time, The End of the Line or click here.

After, click here, and finally click here.

 

Placenta praevia

I guess you all know by now how Elmire Brault died on May 3rd, 1890.

If not, click on the image below.

 

Elmire Brault was just a name that I had found in 2007 while searching for my lost ancestors. Little by little my obsession with finding distant relatives led me in 2009 to write Our Ancestors, then later  find Joe, and visit together an old cemetery in Bristol, Connecticut.

This is how I met Elmire a second time.

Joe’s foot is seen on the right. I owe so much to Joe, and Katie owes so much to him. Joe and I are third cousins. This is a photo of his great-great-grandmother Marguerite Alexandre.

Marguerite Alexandre was my great-grandmother’s sister. I have no pictures of Henriette Alexandre but several pictures of her husband my great-grandfather Dennis Lagasse II, pictures that were shared by Dennis Lagasse IV.

I still hope that one day someone will write me and share Henriette’s pictures.

Until then, I can wait.

I have some information and would love to share…

This is how I met my second cousin once removed on October 10, 2011.

I have some information and would love to share.

Then Dennis wrote this two years later.

Pierre I can’t thank you enough for everything you’re doing, I really was lost when it came to family history. I saw photos when I was young and didn’t know much more than we came from Bristol CT. I heard once or twice about a Dennis before me that was killed at work in the 1920s but that was all I thought there was. To put names on the strangers smiling faces in the old photos gives me a sense of belonging that I’ve never felt before. I knew there had to be more than just “here I am”, now I have “where I’m from” thanks to you.

In a way, Dennis was born on October 10, 2011 since I did not know he had ever existed before. The only person who had existed since 2009 was his grandfather Levi Napoleon Lagasse seen here on an old picture shared by someone who never wrote back.

Levi Napoleon was on the extreme right in the first row. Little by little this puzzling picture became an obsession.

I just had to find out who were all these people from what was written on the original picture.

Levi was written on one of them as well as Pepere and Aunt Ida.

I have come a long way since 2009 when I first started writing Our Ancestors.

This is Post 1227.

I Give Up!

Do you really mean it when you hit a brick wall?

I don’t.

The story of that picture is on this blog which might be hard to find unless you use the search button on the right side.

Having written more than 1200 posts it’s like looking for a needle in a haystack. Fanie Lupien’s name did not give me any headache, just a little…

Elmire Brault’s name is what got me curious when I visited St. Joseph Cemetery with 3rd cousin Joe. Visiting that cemetery was sort of an epiphany…

An epiphany (from the ancient Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, “manifestation, striking appearance”) is an experience of sudden and striking realisation. Generally the term is used to describe scientific breakthrough, religious or philosophical discoveries, but it can apply in any situation in which an enlightening realization allows a problem or situation to be understood from a new and deeper perspective. Epiphanies are studied by psychologists[1][2] and other scholars, particularly those attempting to study the process of innovation.[3][4][5]

Epiphanies are relatively rare occurrences and generally follow a process of significant thought about a problem. Often they are triggered by a new and key piece of information, but importantly, a depth of prior knowledge is required to allow the leap of understanding.[3][4][6][7] Famous epiphanies include Archimedes‘s discovery of a method to determine the density of an object (“Eureka!”) and Isaac Newton‘s realization that a falling apple and the orbiting moon are both pulled by the same force.[6][7][8]

Epiphany that was Fanie Lupien’s real first name… Well sort of…

Fanie was Épiphane. He was named after Epiphanius of Salamis which is found on Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphanius_of_Salamis

Fanie is remembered on a list of families of St. Ann parish in Bristol that I posted here on this blog.

Here is it again in a PDF form.

(familles de la paroisse de Ste-Anne à Bristol)

Today’s post “I give up!” is just a pun because I know I will never give up unless people stop writing me like Kathy did.

This is pretty old, but I was wondering if anyone has more info on Fanie Lupien and his family/descendants.

About this addiction of mine…?

How did Elmire Brault died?

The story continues next Saturday with a picture.

Alexina Breault with Zéphir Choinière

Addicted?

This is one of the reasons why genealogy can become an addictive pastime…

Add Father, Add Mother… + ADD RELATIVE

 

Visiting cemeteries can also be addictive…

Fanie Lupien’s story began there and might stop here unless people share knowledge and old pictures.

Old pictures!

That another good reason to get addicted!

Update on a Mission Impossible

The Brault name struck a cord when I was searching for French-Canadian names with Joe in St. Joseph Cemetery in Bristol. So I took three pictures just to be sure I could read the names later.

Elmire Brault’s name was easy to read, but her husband’s name was hard to clearly see.

I could make out Fanie Lupien, but it looked like Fannie, a woman’s name.

So I got thinking… and thinking, and looking…

Lo and behold Fanie Lupien’s name was somewhere on a list!

(familles de la paroisse de Ste-Anne à Bristol)


Update

Hello Pierre,

I am working on my husband’s genealogy and have hit a bit of a brick wall, I was wondering if you have any additional information on Fanie Lupien or Elmire Brault Lupien of Bristol, CT? I believe Fanie might be my husband’s 2nd great grandfather but records are hard to piece together.

Thanks,

To be continued…?