The little nome going home…

Ron 1

Ron picked him up on his way to Nova Scotia passing through New Brunswick.

2014 July 21

To find his Acadian roots in…

Ron in Nova Scotia

1755-2014

23 July 2014-2

1755-2014

23 July 2014-1

1755-2014

23 July 2014

1755-2014

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Acadian House

More than a house…

Acadia House

Bonjour Pierre,

I’m organizing an outhouse tour for one of Guilford’s historical societies. When I was down town to view one of these hidden gems and meet the current owner I ambled two houses over to finally get a photograph of the Acadian House where Rene “Groc” Hebert and his family lived after being deported from Nova Scotia. You can post these photos if and when you feel it is appropriate or weaves into one of your entries. It is interesting that the privy I went to see had initially been located at the Acadian House.

Have a great summer vacation.
Fran

From all of us… who reads this blog

Happy birthday Paul.

In 2011 Paul was a complete stranger until he wrote this comment.

Dear Mr. Lagacé,

My name in Paul Dauphin and I live in North Carolina.  I very much enjoy receiving and reading your blogs every day.  

My mother (Florence Charbonneau) was from Ste-Anne des Plaines.  Her father was Arthur Charbonneau and her mother was Alice Leclerc.  Arthur’s father was Ovide Charbonneau (I enjoyed the hockey connection in one of your blogs).  She had two brothers: Remi and Flavien.  Flavien was a priest.  She also had a sister – Anita.  All are interred in Ste-Anne des Plaines, except my mother.  She is interred in St. Johnsbury, Vermont where I was born.

Ovide was married to Onezime VeZeau and their children were: Arthur (my grandfather),Joseph, Anna, Henri, and Rev. P. Albert.

All this is to introduce myself and put into context why I am so interested in your blogs.  I will be visiting Ste-Anne this July around the 12th to the 14th.  My wife and brother and I will be going to the cemetery to pay our respects to my aunts and uncles as well as the ancestors that haven’t met.  I am also trying to get in touch with some of my relatives who I haven’t seen in over 30 years.

I would very much like to meet you if that is possible.  I have many photographs in which you might be interested in for your research.  I have two photographs of old houses in Ste-Anne – one is the house of Ovide Charbonneau and the other is of the house of Francois Charbonneau.

I have many other old photos of  people in Ste-Anne that I would gladly share.

I have pictures of Laure Estelle and Sylvio Leveille, who are related and may be be related to you? Also of Gerard and Rita Alari.  Rita and Laure Estell are Charbonneaus.

In any case I would love to sit and chat with you and buy you the beverage of your choice.

At this time I have booked rooms at the Hotel Best Western Plus St. Jerome.  If you have a better suggestion closer to Ste-Anne it would be greatly appreciated.  

I hope that you don’t mind that I wrote to you in English (much easier for me) but I can try to write you in French if you prefer.  I read and speak French moderately well.  

Hoping to hear from you,

Paul
_____________

J. Paul Dauphin

 

Paul is much more than a reader on this blog and much more than a friend.

Footnote

I saw Paul yesterday in St. Johnsbury.

I had to go there and meet him. I met more than just Paul on my way to St. Johnsbury.

I hope Doris reads this post.

Another look into the past – Redux

My new found addicted reader wants to read all I wrote on this blog. I hope she will not do that. There are so many stories in there it’s mind-boggling!

Even I can’t reread them all!

There is a hard lesson to be learned here.  Some people just don’t know when to stop searching for descendants. There is an anecdote about that picture.

The man on the left in the red rectangle is the ancestor of someone I had contacted back in 2009. He told me his mother had an album of old photos. She shared a few pictures and then… dead silence. I never knew the reason even if I tried to contact her again and asked if I had done something wrong.

Lagasse family new 2010-06-18

Click on the image to zoom in.

Sometimes there are no reasons for a dead silence.

What about that picture? I can tell you Hector Lamothe and Ida Lagasse are there.  The man on the right in the red rectangle is Levi Napoleon Lagasse. In 2009, I knew almost nothing about Levi Napoleon until his grandson Dennis Lagasse IV wrote me and shared more than 100 old pictures.

These are just a few.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

All the other pictures are on this blog just waiting for someone to go crazy.

Another look into the past

lagasse-dube-crew-bristol-1918 modification

Click on the image to zoom in.

I have a new interested reader on this blog.

She likes old pictures. This one is part of Dennis Lagasse IV’s collection of about 100 pictures. I posted them all on this blog which has more than 700 posts.

I told my new reader she could start from the start. Somewhat brillant if she likes old pictures because I have collected a few thousands along the way.

I wrote that much so someone might find the blog and get all excited. I just have to sit and wait like a fisherman although I don’t like fishing.

Writing is what I do best beside waiting for someone to comment.

I could tell you that the man with the white hat is my great-grandfather but that might not get you all excited unless you are looking for Hector Lamothe who married Ida Lagasse who were Lucille Lamothe’s parents. Hector is on this picture also.

Lucille Lamothe

Click on the image

Birth: Aug. 27, 1928
Death: Oct. 6, 2007

Lucille, of Vacation Estates Lane, passed away at her home.

She was born in Bristol, Conn. the daughter of Hector and Ida (Lagasse) LaMothe.

Lucille enjoyed spending her time solving cryptograms, crocheting and knitting, but her greatest joy was her family; her eight children, 12 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

She is survived by her children, Brian Bates of Farmington, Richard Bates and wife, Vickie, of Sevierville, Tenn., Bernard D. Bates III of Farmington, Mark Bates and wife, Paula, of Livermore, Patricia Abbott of Washington State, Diane Bates of Farmington, Mary Bates of Sevierville, Tenn., and Linda Bates of Bangor. She will also be greatly missed by grandchildren, Moira Strong, Sara Couture, Jacob Bates, Ronica Smith, Danielle Bates, Rebecca Couture, Amy Littlefield, Crystal Littlefield, Garth Winslow, Eric Winslow, Collin Sweatt, Stephanie Sweatt, Jenika Kelley and Jonathan Butman; as well as her seven great-grandchildren; several nieces; nephews; and cousins.

She was predeceased by her beloved husband, Bernard D. Bates Jr.; sisters, Jeanette Taylor and Rita Creedon; and her brother William LaMothe.

I Know Someone Who Is Going to Be Very Happy… Redux

This is what I wrote in 2011. You will understand how I came to know Paul and his brother Albert.

I did not have much to write about on this blog since I wrote about my good friend Ron Depatie  down in Ontario.

Well until this afternoon when someone wrote a comment…

Dear Mr. Lagacé,

My name is Paul Dauphin and I live in North Carolina.  I very much enjoy receiving and reading your blogs every day.  

My mother (Florence Charbonneau) was from Ste-Anne des Plaines.  Her father was Arthur Charbonneau and her mother was Alice Leclerc. 

Arthur’s father was Ovide Charbonneau (I enjoyed the hockey connection in one of your blogs).  She had two brothers: Remi and Flavien.  Flavien was a priest.  She also had a sister – Anita.  All are interred in Ste-Anne des Plaines, except my mother.  She is interred in St. Johnsbury, Vermont where I was born.

Ovide was married to Onezime Vezeau and their children were: Arthur (my grandfather), Joseph, Anna, Henri, and Rev. P. Albert.  

All this is to introduce myself and put into context why I am so interested in your blogs.  I will be visiting Ste-Anne this July around the 12th to the 14th.  My wife and brother and I will be going to the cemetery to pay our respects to my aunts and uncles as well as the ancestors that haven’t met.  I am also trying to get in touch with some of my relatives who I haven’t seen in over 30 years.

I would very much like to meet you if that is possible.  I have many photographs in which you might be interested in for your research.  I have two photographs of old houses in Ste-Anne – one is the house of Ovide Charbonneau and the other is of the house of François Charbonneau.

I have many other old photos of  people in Ste-Anne that I would gladly share.
I have pictures of Laure Estelle and Sylvio Léveillé, who are related and may be related to you? Also of Gerard and Rita Alari.  Rita and Laure Estell are Charbonneaus.

In any case I would love to sit and chat with you and buy you the beverage of your choice.

At this time I have booked rooms at the Hotel Best Western Plus St. Jerome.  If you have a better suggestion closer to Ste-Anne it would be greatly appreciated.  

I hope that you don’t mind that I wrote to you in English (much easier for me) but I can try to write you in French if you prefer.  I read and speak French moderately well.  

Hoping to hear from you,

Paul

I know some guy in Ontario with roots in Ste-Anne-des-Plaines who is going to be very happy to read my articles once more… and meet a 6th cousin.

Time to Reflect Upon Stress

My cousin Joe sent me this… with this quote he always puts at the end.

Paul Harvey: “If there is a 50-50 chance that something can go wrong, then 9 times out of ten it will.”

Great Lesson on Stress

A young lady confidently walked around the room with a raised glass of water while leading a seminar and explaining stress management to her audience. Everyone knew she was going to ask the ultimate question,  ‘Half empty or half full?’ She fooled them all. “How heavy is this glass of water?” she inquired with a smile.  Answers called out ranged from 8 oz. to 20 oz.   She replied, “The absolute weight doesn’t matter.
It depends on how long I hold it.   If I hold it for a minute, that’s not a problem.
If I hold it for an hour, I’ll have an ache in my right arm.If I hold it for a day, you’ll have to call an ambulance.  In each case it’s the same weight, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes.”

She continued, “and that’s the way it is with stress.  If we carry our burdens all the time, sooner or later, as the burden becomes increasingly heavy, we won’t be able to carry on.”

“As with the glass of water, you have to put it down for a while and rest before holding it again. When we’re refreshed, we can carry on with the burden – holding stress longer and better each time practiced.

So, as early in the evening as you can, put all your burdens down.  Don’t carry them through the evening and into the night.   Pick them up again tomorrow if you must.

1 * Accept the fact that some days you’re the pigeon, and some days you’re the statue!

2 * Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them.

3 * Always read stuff that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.

4 * Drive carefully… It’s not only cars that can be recalled by their Maker.

5 * If you can’t be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.

6 * If you lend someone $20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it.

7 * It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

8 * Never buy a car you can’t push.

9 * Never put both feet in your mouth at the same time, because then you won’t have a leg to stand on.

10 * Nobody cares if you can’t dance well.   Just get up and dance.

11 * Since it’s the early worm that gets eaten by the bird, sleep late.

12 * The second mouse gets the cheese.

13 * When everything’s coming your way, you’re in the wrong lane.

14 * Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.

16 * Some mistakes are too much fun to make only once.

17 * We could learn a lot from crayons.  Some are sharp, some are pretty and some are dull. Some have weird names and all are different colors, but they all have to live in the same box.

18 * A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour.

19 * Have an awesome day and know that someone has thought about you today.

 

Who Remembers Firmin Dubé?

Who remembers Firmin Dubé?

Who remembers Lenore Kinsler if that’s her real surname?

Karen does remember even if they are her distant ancestors from Alpena township, Alpena, Michigan, United States.

She is the reader who added her grain of salt last time on this blog after cousin Joe’s forwarded message.

Her comments were touching in a way…

I love your post today Pierre from a Dube and associated families fan. Hope you post my other comment too…
Karen

I did not post her other comments because it had too much personal information about her roots. But I contacted her since she is a descendant of Mathurin Dubé and I offered her to visit my Ancestry site for free.

Mathurin Dubé

I never get tired of finding Dubé relatives… and everything is always free.

Grain of Salt

Someone added her grain of salt to Joe’s message…

All I I have to say about that is I’d like to share this from Wikipedia if ok…

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Simplified parse tree
PN = proper noun
N = noun
V = verb
NP = noun phrase
RC = relative clause
VP = verb phrase
S = sentence

“Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo” is a grammatically valid sentence in American English, used as an example of how homonyms and homophones can be used to create complicated linguistic constructs. It has been discussed in literature since 1972 when the sentence was used by William J. Rapaport, an associate professor at the University at Buffalo.[1] It was posted to Linguist List by Rapaport in 1992.[2] It was also featured in Steven Pinker’s 1994 book The Language Instinct as an example of a sentence that is “seemingly nonsensical” but grammatical. Pinker names his student Annie Senghas as the inventor of the sentence.[3]

The sentence’s meaning becomes clearer when it’s understood that it uses the city of Buffalo, New York and the somewhat-uncommon verb “to buffalo” (meaning “to bully or intimidate”), and when the punctuation and grammar is expanded so that the sentence reads as follows: “Buffalo buffalo that Buffalo buffalo buffalo, buffalo Buffalo buffalo.” The meaning becomes even clearer when synonyms are used: “Buffalo bison that other Buffalo bison bully, themselves bully Buffalo bison.”