What your comments mean to Our Ancestors?

A lot!

This was Linda’s comment last week on Our Ancestors…

I have some additional information on the family of Amable Benoit dit Livernois and Elisabeth Vasseur dite Bellisle. In addition to Joseph Treffle and Alexander, they had five more children. After Amable’s death, Elisabeth with all of the children except Treffle moved to Hinesburg, Vermont. She married Joseph Gotier, but I don’t know if the marriage took place in Canada or in Vermont. Elisabeth died April 22, 1892 and is buried in Rhode Island Cemetery in Hinesburg. Joseph died in Jericho, Vermont, on January 24, 1895, and is buried with Elizabeth.

Other children of Amable and Elizabeth– Julie/Julia, was born in St. Charles sur Richelieu 7 March 1831. She married in Canada before 1850 Carlos Baisner, son of Peter and Margaret (Maynard) Baisner. Carlos had several land transactions with Julia’s brothers Belonia and Francis and with her mother. Julia died 29 October 1906 in Hinesburg.

Charles was born in St. Charles 1 June 1832. Charles enlisted in the army on 9 June 1862. He was captured on 2 February 1864 and sent to Andersonville Prison in Georgia where he died in December 1864. His name is on the same stone as his mother and step-father in Rhode Island Cemetery in Hinesburg.

Amable/Amos was born in St. Charles on 15 April 1834. Before 1859 he married Emily Shepard, daughter of William and Lucy (Little) Shepard. The couple eventually divorced. Amos moved to Worcester, Massachusetts, around 1890. About the turn of the century he moved to Marlboro, New Hampshire, where he died 28 October 1906.

Belonia (Belona, Balonia, etc.–many different spellings) was born in St. Charles 31 July 1838. About 1868 he married Rebecca Phillips, daughter of Solomon and Susan (Sherman) Phillips. In 1870 he and his wife and child were living with his mother and step-father. By 1880 the family had moved to Huntington, Vermont, where he lived the rest of his life. He died there 28 September 1916. He is the only child of Amable and Elizabeth for whom I could not find a baptismal record in the St. Charles-sur-Richelieu parish records. His Vermont death record lists his parents as Amos and Elizabeth (Belisle) Benoit.

Francois/Francis was born in St. Charles 2 October 1840. About 1866 he married Celinda Ash. The couple later broke up. He lived in Hinesburg and later in Jericho, where he lived with his daughters Irma, who owned a dairy farm, and Ida. Francis died 1 October 1923 in Jericho and is buried in Rhode Island Cemetery in Hinesburg. His name is on the same stone as his mother, step-father, and brother Charles.

All of these children, with the exception of Charles, had children.

Linda Mathew

As usual I have entered this information on my private family tree on Ancestry. Then I said to myself…

You know what? This whole idea of keeping my family tree set on private maybe is not such a good thing after 9 years, especially with close to 50,000 files and 10,000 images…

I think I could share it with the whole world like so many people did. 

This is why last week my family tree on Ancestry has been set on public.

Next time on Our Ancestors? 

What about learning more about Beloni Benoît dit Livernois who became… 

Belonia (Belona, Balonia, etc.–many different spellings) was born in St. Charles 31 July 1838. About 1868 he married Rebecca Phillips, daughter of Solomon and Susan (Sherman) Phillips. In 1870 he and his wife and child were living with his mother and step-father. By 1880 the family had moved to Huntington, Vermont, where he lived the rest of his life. He died there 28 September 1916. He is the only child of Amable and Elizabeth for whom I could not find a baptismal record in the St. Charles-sur-Richelieu parish records. His Vermont death record lists his parents as Amos and Elizabeth (Belisle) Benoit.

Stay tuned!

 

 

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Being Almost 100% Sure?

I had a feeling about my last post…

I saw your post below about a Benoit ancestor so I sent the link to a cousin of mine. She is a direct descendant of Paul Benoit dit Livernois (1623-1686) and is a genealogy fanatic also.

We saw that you believe Alexandre Bennett/Benoit is the son of Francois Benoit dit Livernois & Angelique Fontaine dite Bienvenu. However, according to PRDH, their son Amable died in 1841 in Ste-Charles-Sur-Richelieu. What is way more likely is that your Alexander Bennett was Alexandre Benoit (no Livernois) born 14 Oct and bap 15 Oct 1833 in Montreal. This Alexandre was the son of Jean Baptist Benoit & Emilie Migneault dite Labrie, and the grandson of Pierre Benoit (b abt 1744 in Acadia, d 1814 in St-Luc, Que) who was deported as part of the Acadian expulsion.

I hope this helps and does not confuse things even more.

Liza

Confused?

Alexander Bennett story might not be over after all, so stay tuned.

However a new chapter of Our Ancestors is coming soon. It’s about a comment made in 2012 and a little search for distant relatives in Ontario.

Keep those comments coming!

One clue leads to another… Update

The update is at the end of the post…

After Jeffrey commented on the Campbells, Don Daniel added this:

Hello to my Lagace/ Lagasse relatives. My research leads me to suspect but not prove that my 3rd great-grandfather may have been Daniel McKinnon, probably a member of the 78th Fraser Highlanders who occupied Quebec City and the surrounding area from 1760 to December 1763. Together with Marguerite Euphrosine Hamelin dit Pagnol, he may have fathered a child born on 9 September 1762 in Grondines. The evidence is merely circumstancial, but Jeffrey’s post adds to it. He was probably around 37 at the time. If he is the father, he abandoned his child and her mother and eventual settled in Berthier-sur-Mer where he married (presumably for the first time) in 1768. With his wife, Marie Angelique Rinfret-Malouin, he fathered another 17+ children and died in 1802.

Don Daniel

As always I got curious which led me to find this on the Internet.

About Daniel Macanneville OR McKinnon

Don Daniel

Marguerite Euphrosine and Daniel never married. He is not the father of ME as listed above. If Daniel Macaneville is Daniel McKinnon, then he did marry, in 1768, Marie Angelique Rinfret dit Malouin. Is it possible that this mystery man is Daniel McKinnon? Here are my hypotheses, guesses, and “hard” (?) facts. Let me list some not necessarily in the most logical order.

Pierre Daniel Macanneville is my 2nd g-gf. His marriage contract of 13 Jan 1798 identifies him as illegitimate, but marginalia identifies “Daniel Macanneville” and Marguerite Eurphrosine Hamelin dit Pagnol as his unwedded parents. There is no record of any such Macanneville (variously spelled phonetically) in any other Canadian records or UK records that I have scoured. I believe the way the name was spelled reflected the way it sounded to the notary writing the document. The “Mac” part of his name suggests a person of Gaelic/ Celtic/ Scottish/ Irish origin consistent with the majority of my DNA. (We refer to him as “Alleycat”: he came, he saw, he seduced, he left.) More on this below. Marguerite Euphrosine is well-documented. Born 1745. Died 1820. Resident of Grondines, located along the St. Lawrence just SW of Quebec City. No record indicates she ever married. No baptismal certificate lists her as a mother. But an illegitimate child born 9 Sep 1762 in Grondines and baptized “Pierre” has a Charlotte Hamelin as godmother. No mention of mother but I am assuming that this Marguerite’s and Alleycat’s son. She never married. Another link between Marguerite and Pierre Daniel Macanneville, the groom in 1798, is that the marriage needed a dispensation for “third degree of consanguinity.” This meant that people knew Pierre’s provenance. Pierre married Rose Chavigny. Her grandmother Genevieve Chavigny married Joseph-Marie Hamelin dit Pagnol. So, if Pierre is the son of Marguerite Hamelin and marrying a Chavigny, then a dispensation would be needed in view of the earlier Genevieve Chavigny-Joseph Hamelin marriage. This nails down for me that he is the son of Marguerite. As for Alleycat’s paternity, if he was in the 78th Fraser Highlanders —the rolls list Donald McKinnon—he could be the father. The 78th was garrisoned in and around Quebec at the time. If he was born in 1725, he would have been around 37 yrs old when Pierre was born. I cannot believe that he was celibate all that time. If he is the one who married Angelique Rinfret in 1768, then he would be 53. For him to father 17 (as per my records) or 20 kids (as per yours) with her boggles my mind. Records concerning both Pierre Daniel Macanneville and Daniel McKinnon reveal a near score of “aliases”: McKinville, McKinval, McBonneville, McBanvil, McKendit, Kinnine, Kinnal, and others including phonetic variants. Even Daniel McKinnon’s burial certificate refers to “Daniel M. Kinnon” and “Daniel M. Kinnan.” Pierre’s daughters used different variants within their lifetime and his burial certificate uses McBanvil.

In Diane Perron-Latour’s family tree in Geneanet, she says of Daniel Macaneville:

“Il est possiblement Sieur Daniel McKinal qui a épousé Marie Angélique [Rinfret-] Malouin.” She may be right. In several sites, variants of McKinnon include Maccan, Macannan, Macannon, Mckinal, Mahinal, McKinlay, McKenne, and the like–all close variants that drop the “vil” or “ville” extension. Also, see following from NOSORIGINES: Prénom: Daniel Nom: McKinnon Sexe: M Occupation: Naissance: 1725 Paroisse/ville: Pays: Écosse Décès: 22 février 1802 – âge: 77 Paroisse/ville: Berthier, Montmagny Pays: Canada Information, autres enfants, notes, etc. Le premier seigneur en 1781 de Matane était Donald McKinnon qui arrive en 1759 avec Wolfe. Il est négociant et soldat et il marie le 22 avril 1765 à Montréal Françoise Tanon. On trouve sa sépulture le 9 août 1792 à Rimouski. Il n’ont pas d’enfant. Dans un testament devant le notaire Pinguet le 29 mai 1780 il nomme comme héritier son neuveu Donald McKinnon. Ce Donald n’est pas identique avec Daniel, époux de Angélique Rinfret-Malouin. Daniel McKinnon ne vient jamais à Matane. Il demeurait à Berthier ou il excerce le métier d’aubergiste cabaretier. Il meurt en 1802 à Berthier et il a 77 ans. Gérard Caron avance comme naissance le 7 novembre 1725, Gorvan, Lanark, Écosse. Nous n’avons pas de preuve pour cela. Il est l’ancêtre de toutes les familles McKinnon de Matane (Source: Les vieilles familles de Matane: Famille McKinnon)

Family Search L8PY-M5W refers to him as Sieur, but is wrong. The sieur is Donald, sieur de Matane. And adds: Christening 07 NOV 1725 Govan,Lanark,Scotland It also lists parents Hugh McKinnon and Margeret Mclain w/ no indication of marriage and no further info about them.

He was 43 yrs old when he married. He was a soldier with Wolfe in 1759 in the Quebec area, If Pierre was indeed born in Sep 1762, then DM could have been the father. He is probably associated with the 78th Fraser Highlanders who occupied Quebec at the time. The rations list for the 78th at the time of disbandment lists several Donald McKinnons. Acc to (Re‐printed from Tasmanian Ancestry, Vol. 8, No. 3 , December 1997) INTERCHANGEABLE SURNAMES AND PERSONAL NAMES IN SCOTTISH HIGHLAND REGISTERS AND THE PROBLEM OF IDENTIFICATION by Alan G. Macpherson, it was common to substitute Donald and Daniel and one website refers to “Donald–Daniel McKinnon.” And there are several Donald and Daniel McKinnon floating about at that time.

Acc. to

http://www.gaspejohnpaterson.ca/pages/78regiment.pdf: 1761

passed uneventfully with companies spread out from Levis along the south shore of the St. Lawrence as far as Riviere-du-Loup.

Don told me he was the author and asked for my help. I told him he seems to be the expert, but I could take a quick look. That was before he added…

It would be wonderful if you can move this beyond supposition and into proven fact. (PS: My mother was Marie Adeline Yvette Amabellisse Lagace.)

Don and I are distant cousins!

Now the update!

This is a comment left by a reader:

Donald and Daniel McKinnon are two different persons. Donald died in 1791 in Matane. His wife was Françoise Tanon, who died in 1790. They had no children. Daniel married Angélique Rinfret (dit Malouin) and died in 1802. He never came to Matane. However, Daniel is the ancestor of the McKinnons from Matane. His grandchildren moved to Matane, with no link to the sieur Donald McKinnon. Many sources confound them for this reason; linking the Matane MacKinnon to sieur Donald, while they actually descend from Daniel. I’ve seen some sources citing Angélique Rinfret dying in Matane in 1790. This is not true, her death act can be found easily on websites such as ancestry.ca. She died in Berthier in 1811. Françoise Tanon died in 1790 in Matane. These two persons are definitely different.

Also this was added:

Daniel McKinnon is often referred to as « Daniel McKinal » in the French documents.

One clue leads to another…

After Jeffrey commented on the Campbells, Don Daniel added this:

Hello to my Lagace/ Lagasse relatives. My research leads me to suspect but not prove that my 3rd great-grandfather may have been Daniel McKinnon, probably a member of the 78th Fraser Highlanders who occupied Quebec City and the surrounding area from 1760 to December 1763. Together with Marguerite Euphrosine Hamelin dit Pagnol, he may have fathered a child born on 9 September 1762 in Grondines. The evidence is merely circumstancial, but Jeffrey’s post adds to it. He was probably around 37 at the time. If he is the father, he abandoned his child and her mother and eventual settled in Berthier-sur-Mer where he married (presumably for the first time) in 1768. With his wife, Marie Angelique Rinfret-Malouin, he fathered another 17+ children and died in 1802.

Don Daniel

As always I got curious which led me to find this on the Internet.

About Daniel Macanneville OR McKinnon

Don Daniel

Marguerite Euphrosine and Daniel never married. He is not the father of ME as listed above.

If Daniel Macaneville is Daniel McKinnon, then he did marry, in 1768, Marie Angelique Rinfret dit Malouin.

Is it possible that this mystery man is Daniel McKinnon?

Here are my hypotheses, guesses, and “hard” (?) facts. Let me list some not necessarily in the most logical order.

Pierre Daniel Macanneville is my 2nd g-gf. His marriage contract of 13 Jan 1798 identifies him as illegitimate, but marginalia identifies “Daniel Macanneville” and Marguerite Eurphrosine Hamelin dit Pagnol as his unwedded parents. There is no record of any such Macanneville (variously spelled phonetically) in any other Canadian records or UK records that I have scoured. I believe the way the name was spelled reflected the way it sounded to the notary writing the document. The “Mac” part of his name suggests a person of Gaelic/ Celtic/ Scottish/ Irish origin consistent with the majority of my DNA. (We refer to him as “Alleycat”: he came, he saw, he seduced, he left.) More on this below. Marguerite Euphrosine is well-documented. Born 1745. Died 1820. Resident of Grondines, located along the St. Lawrence just SW of Quebec City. No record indicates she ever married. No baptismal certificate lists her as a mother. But an illegitimate child born 9 Sep 1762 in Grondines and baptized “Pierre” has a Charlotte Hamelin as godmother. No mention of mother but I am assuming that this Marguerite’s and Alleycat’s son. She never married. Another link between Marguerite and Pierre Daniel Macanneville, the groom in 1798, is that the marriage needed a dispensation for “third degree of consanguinity.” This meant that people knew Pierre’s provenance. Pierre married Rose Chavigny. Her grandmother Genevieve Chavigny married Joseph-Marie Hamelin dit Pagnol. So, if Pierre is the son of Marguerite Hamelin and marrying a Chavigny, then a dispensation would be needed in view of the earlier Genevieve Chavigny-Joseph Hamelin marriage. This nails down for me that he is the son of Marguerite. As for Alleycat’s paternity, if he was in the 78th Fraser Highlanders —the rolls list Donald McKinnon—he could be the father. The 78th was garrisoned in and around Quebec at the time. If he was born in 1725, he would have been around 37 yrs old when Pierre was born. I cannot believe that he was celibate all that time. If he is the one who married Angelique Rinfret in 1768, then he would be 53. For him to father 17 (as per my records) or 20 kids (as per yours) with her boggles my mind. Records concerning both Pierre Daniel Macanneville and Daniel McKinnon reveal a near score of “aliases”: McKinville, McKinval, McBonneville, McBanvil, McKendit, Kinnine, Kinnal, and others including phonetic variants. Even Daniel McKinnon’s burial certificate refers to “Daniel M. Kinnon” and “Daniel M. Kinnan.” Pierre’s daughters used different variants within their lifetime and his burial certificate uses McBanvil.

In Diane Perron-Latour’s family tree in Geneanet, she says of Daniel Macaneville:

“Il est possiblement Sieur Daniel McKinal qui a épousé Marie Angélique [Rinfret-] Malouin.” She may be right. In several sites, variants of McKinnon include Maccan, Macannan, Macannon, Mckinal, Mahinal, McKinlay, McKenne, and the like–all close variants that drop the “vil” or “ville” extension. Also, see following from NOSORIGINES: Prénom: Daniel Nom: McKinnon Sexe: M Occupation: Naissance: 1725 Paroisse/ville: Pays: Écosse Décès: 22 février 1802 – âge: 77 Paroisse/ville: Berthier, Montmagny Pays: Canada Information, autres enfants, notes, etc. Le premier seigneur en 1781 de Matane était Donald McKinnon qui arrive en 1759 avec Wolfe. Il est négociant et soldat et il marie le 22 avril 1765 à Montréal Françoise Tanon. On trouve sa sépulture le 9 août 1792 à Rimouski. Il n’ont pas d’enfant. Dans un testament devant le notaire Pinguet le 29 mai 1780 il nomme comme héritier son neuveu Donald McKinnon. Ce Donald n’est pas identique avec Daniel, époux de Angélique Rinfret-Malouin. Daniel McKinnon ne vient jamais à Matane. Il demeurait à Berthier ou il excerce le métier d’aubergiste cabaretier. Il meurt en 1802 à Berthier et il a 77 ans. Gérard Caron avance comme naissance le 7 novembre 1725, Gorvan, Lanark, Écosse. Nous n’avons pas de preuve pour cela. Il est l’ancêtre de toutes les familles McKinnon de Matane (Source: Les vieilles familles de Matane: Famille McKinnon)

Family Search L8PY-M5W refers to him as Sieur, but is wrong. The sieur is Donald, sieur de Matane. And adds: Christening 07 NOV 1725 Govan,Lanark,Scotland It also lists parents Hugh McKinnon and Margeret Mclain w/ no indication of marriage and no further info about them.

He was 43 yrs old when he married. He was a soldier with Wolfe in 1759 in the Quebec area, If Pierre was indeed born in Sep 1762, then DM could have been the father. He is probably associated with the 78th Fraser Highlanders who occupied Quebec at the time. The rations list for the 78th at the time of disbandment lists several Donald McKinnons. Acc to (Re‐printed from Tasmanian Ancestry, Vol. 8, No. 3 , December 1997) INTERCHANGEABLE SURNAMES AND PERSONAL NAMES IN SCOTTISH HIGHLAND REGISTERS AND THE PROBLEM OF IDENTIFICATION by Alan G. Macpherson, it was common to substitute Donald and Daniel and one website refers to “Donald–Daniel McKinnon.” And there are several Donald and Daniel McKinnon floating about at that time.

Acc. to http://www.gaspejohnpaterson.ca/pages/78regiment.pdf: 1761 passed uneventfully with companies spread out from Levis along the south shore of the St. Lawrence as far as Riviere-du-Loup.

Don told me he was the author and asked for my help. I told him he seems to be the expert, but I could take a quick look. That was before he added…

It would be wonderful if you can move this beyond supposition and into proven fact. (PS: My mother was Marie Adeline Yvette Amabellisse Lagace.)

Don and I are distant cousins!

 

About the Campbells…

Jeffrey posted a comment which merits our attention…

Following up with the missing marriage record for William Campbell and Marie Josephte Chartier, I have uncovered evidence in the form of a general military order, issued by [presumably] General Murray, commander of British Forces in Quebec after the death of General James Wolfe, stating: “The general desires that the commanding officers of the Regts. [regiments] will not suffer their men to mary [sic] the French.’ Dated at Quebec, 6 October 1759. Translation: British soldiers were not permitted to marry the local ladies during that stage of the war in Canada. 

This would explain the missing marriage record for our ancestor ca. 1761, the year of the birth of their first daughter. More importantly, it solidifies the couple most likely never legally married; perhaps they handfasted their relationship?

As always, those requiring a copy of the document for their personal records please advise.

Best,

Jeffrey

Do You Remember Harvey Louis Lagasse?

Of course you do!

Genealogy is not my forte.

Harvey Lagasse

Harvey Louis Lagasse, a distant cousin I have never met, was part of a B-24 Liberator crew. Earl Cullison was the pilot and Roy Sutton was the co-pilot.

This is what Earl Cullison’s nephew sent me about Roy Sutton.


The Story about Roy Sutton Jr. being shot down in WWII
Written by Sgt. Ernest Gordon Liner.

A Crewmate of Roy Sutton

Sgt Ernest Gordon Liner was a tail gunner in the 758th Bomb Squadron. He was shot down on August 22,1944 in his B-24 H, named The Moron, Serial # 42-52344 and became a POW.

The Pilot of The Moron was Lt Jerry A Cullison. Their ship was shot down on 459 BG Mission # 95 to bomb the synthetic oil refineries at Blechhammer, Germany, August 22, 1944 a long difficult eight and a half hour trip if you made it. The 459th Bomb Group lost 5 planes that day, 50 airmen MIA that day on a terrible mission 2 each from the 758th Bomb Squadron and the 759th Bomb Squadron and one from the 757th Bomb Squadron. All of us who flew missions to Blechhammer, Germany remember those missions as being one of the roughest ever because of flak, fighters, weather and sweating out low fuel status because of the distance and resistance encountered.

Memories by Ernest
I enlisted in the Air Force and was inducted at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, reporting later to Miami Beach, Florida, in November of 1943. We lived in hotels and took basic training on a golf course and on the beach. From there we went to Panama City, Florida for further training. From Panama City we were sent to Mitchell Field, New York for crew assignment. The following men were members of the crew: Pilot Jerry Cullison of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Co-pilot Roy Sutton of Norfolk, Virginia; Navigator Vaughn; Bombardier Harvey Lagasse of Bristol, Connecticut; Engineer Harold Botwright of Philipsburg, Pennsylvania; Waist gunner T. Tomlinson of Sour Lake, Texas; Ball turret gunner A.J. Benetti of San Fernando, California; Radio operator and Top turret gunner Paul Pete Peterson of Portland, Connecticut; Nose gunner A.J. Tony La Spina of Summit, New Jersey; and myself, Tail gunner Gordon Liner of Hillsborough, North Carolina. As a crew we were sent to Charleston, South Carolina and started flying together.

When I reported to basic training I had had to leave my girlfriend Franny in Baltimore. So, after basic I asked her to come to Charleston and we would get married. I rented a furnished room a month ahead to hold it, and she came down and we got married June 3, 1944. She stayed until I got leave and we went back to Baltimore where I had to leave her and return to Charleston. From Charleston we went to Westover Field, Massachusetts, where we flew submarine patrol for two weeks. There we were given a new plane for our own to go overseas. We left Mitchell Field, New York and went to Bangor, Maine to pick up supplies and extra equipment to prepare to go overseas. We left the states and went to Newfoundland and stayed there about a week because of bad weather. When the weather finally broke, we went on to the Azores where we gassed up for the flight to Africa. We landed in Marrakech, flew on to Tunis, and from there we flew to Foggia, Italy where they took our plane and gave us an old beaten up one. Later we found out that this was customary; a new plane was given to a crew that was about finished and ready to go back to the United States.

We were assigned to an air base at Cherignola, Italy and given a six man tent to sleep in at the edge of an almond orchard. At first we had a dirt floor, cots and candles for lights. We started improving the flooring and made some cabinets out of cardboard and rolled up the sides of the tent to get cool air. After a week or two we were given one bulb for light which got its power from a generator at the base.

We started flying with other crews to learn how to fly in formation. Experienced pilots flew with us for a few days and then we were on our own to fly every day. The weather permitting, we then started flying actual combat missions on August 12, 1944. Our flights were as follows:

Date          Target                                                       Plane
August 12  Northern Italy, early return            Hard to Get
August 14  Northern Italy, early return            Hard to Get
August 17  Ploesti, Romania, flack and fighters    Beats Me Mack
August 18  Ploesti, Romania, flack and fighters    The Moron
August 21  Air field in Hungary, flack and fighters    Beats Me Mack
August 22  Blechammer, Germany, flack and fighters   The Moron    DID NOT RETURN

The targets in northern Italy were called milk runs because they were more like training missions but the Ploesti targets were the worst in Europe for enemy flack and fighters. The Hungary targets were bad for fighters, but Blechammer was as bad as Ploesti because we had to fight our way from the target until we had to parachute out of the plane. Before we got to the target we lost an engine due to flack (ground fire). We saw one plane blow up and two others take hits. On three engines, we could not keep up with the formation. After the bombs were dropped, we were attacked by four fighters and lost another engine as well as other damage. One fighter came toward the tail, another from the side, and yet another from the under side. I shot the plane attacking our tail and it exploded. The fighter on the side killed Tomlinson and the ball turret gunner was hit, giving the German fighters two positions not covered. The next attacks came from above, and top gunner Peterson and I both were shooting at him and he was hit and bailed out. Then, I realized we were going down fast and our radio was shot out. I got out of my turret and went up into the waist and put on my parachute. Top gunner Peterson came down into the waist with his parachute on, and I had to move waist gunner Tomlinsons body from the escape door so we could get out. I opened the hatch and motioned for Peterson to go out, but he motioned for me to go! I realized that we had to get out, so I jumped. Peterson told me later, when he saw my chute open, he jumped, too.

As we were going down, we could see people shooting at us. A German fighter came straight toward me and we had heard about the pilots shooting at airmen in their chutes. But, at the last minute he tipped his wing and came close enough for me to see him motion to me. I went down in the woods and the others were captured in an open field. I could not get my chute out of the trees, so I took off my flying suit and boots and left them in a stump hole. I crawled under the bushes and tried to collect my thoughts, removed my escape kit and tried to determine where I was. The pilot had said we were in Hungary when we first began to be attacked by fighters. Later, I decided to move to a better location and I had not gone but about ten steps when someone hollered and I looked beside me to see a German soldier with a rifle pointing straight at me. He kept motioning for me to put my hands up and he was as scared of me as I was of him. Another soldier then came up and they searched me. They kept saying pistols, I guess because they knew we were issued .45 pistols. I told them that mine had gone down with the plane. I was always glad that I didn’t wear it, because I might have tried to use it. They took me out of the woods to a road where there were other people and a wagon that held a German pilot with his parachute rolled up in his lap. I was told to get on the wagon with the pilot who was about eighteen years old with blond hair and about my size. He smiled and motioned with his finger and said I putt putt you and you putt, putt me. We were taken to a small village about the size of Efland, North Carolina and it had a jail. There I saw two others of my crew and four members of another crew at the jail where we spent the night with bed bugs, roaches and everything else. The next day we were moved through the village and were fortunate to have the German soldiers along to keep civilians off of us. They were throwing things, spitting and hollering gangsters to us. We later understood why when we passed a hospital that had been bombed.

We were put on a truck with eight others and carried into the city of Budapest. Once in Budapest we were given something to eat, the first food we had had since we were shot down. We were then questioned and our belts, shoe laces, rings, watches and everything that we had in our pockets was taken from us. We found out later that we were in an old political prison. The building was three stories high, and was open in the center with walkways around each staircase. All of the cells were solitary cells about four feet by sixteen feet in size with no windows, and one light bulb that burned all of the time. Our comforts consisted of one cot, a door with a slot through which bowls of soup were given to us twice a day, one loaf of bread a day, and one bucket for a toilet. No one ever spoke. Enduring seven days of this, you did a great deal of thinking. I counted the bricks in that cell a thousand times and I thought I would remember the number, but I don’t. After seven days of silence I was taken to a German officer for questioning. We had been trained to give only our name, rank and serial number. I was then sent back to my cell for another seven days, followed by another trip for questioning. This time, a German who spoke perfect English told me that he would say things to me that he only wanted me to verify. I was told the type of plane we were in, the type of bombs we dropped, the target we hit, our air base in Italy and where we were trained. I figured one of our crew members told them all of this information. I was sent to another room with three members of my crew and they said that they were told the same thing, and it was good to have someone to talk to. After a few days we were taken under heavy guard to a train station, where we were put on those notorious, forty by eight, boxcars that were known all over Germany; forty men or eight horses. I think there must have been forty of us in the car when more men were brought in. It was too crowded to lie down, so we had to stand or sit. We were locked in our boxcar and in the next one were the guards with their dogs. We only had one bucket for a toilet for over forty men. Some men were sick and some were injured. We were on the train for two days before we were allowed to get out and given water and bread. At this point everyone was getting filthy and many had dysentery, yet with still only one bucket on the boxcar. We stopped in a large rail yard one night and the R.A.F. came over dropping bombs. The guards left for shelters and we were left behind, locked in the boxcar. Luckily the bombs missed us but they did tear up some of the rails further ahead. We stayed there another day, still locked up. Finally, we started again, attached to another train, and we started seeing lots of bomb damage to towns and bridges as we passed through Poland. After five days the train stopped and we were told to get out. We were at a train station in a small town where there were guards with dogs to escort us on a one mile walk to our camp. By this time, we were in pitiful shape. The camp was still being built, but we were assigned to barracks with twenty-two men, all together in one room. We had a spigot to wash up with and a latrine which had ten holes. Many times you didn’t have time to wait. For that reason it was a very good thing our government sent lots of clothes and shoes to the camps.


 

Jerry Cullison Jr. as an officer was sent to the famous Stalag Luft III. Uncle Jerry was then sent to Stalag Luft III-D where he stayed until he was liberated. Roy Sutton Jr. was an officer too… But I do not know if he was sent to the same POW camps…Earl Cullison Jr

About Roy Sutton…

Roy C. Sutton Jr.
Norfolk – Roy Clifton Sutton Jr., a lifelong Norfolk resident, died on October 16, five days shy of his 93rd birthday. The cause was heart failure.
“Roy Jr.” was raised on the beach at Ocean View, a place which forever was in his heart. He graduated from Maury High School, and then attended the college of William and Mary in Norfolk, and then in Williamsburg. His studies were interrupted by WWII, during which he rose to the rank of Captain in the Air Force. He was co-piloting a plane during a bombing mission over Hungary, when his plane was shot down. He spent nine months in a German POW camp, and then was rescued by Patton’s army. He then continued his studies, ultimately earning a degree in Physics. He entered business and became a part-owner of Sutton Appliance Company. He married Kathleen Sams in 1953, and began a family. He continued his love of athletics, joining the Portsmouth YMCA, and being well-known for winning many handball and tennis tournaments. Even into his eighties, he remained involved in competitions, being active in the Senior Olympics in multiple events. Until six months before his death, he was swimming laps twice a week. Recently, he was recognized as one of the members of the famous football “Last Team” at ODU.

This is post 1235…

How I met Anna Campbell? Update

This is a short intermission. It’s about Anna not Charlotte M. Campbell. 


This post has received lots of comments since I posted it. The last comment is most interesting.

http://wp.me/pExNc-5jP

This is the comment Jeffrey Campbell wrote.

I have undisputable proof, with documentation, of some very important details with regards to William Campbell and his wife, Marie.

First, I have paperwork which proves William Campbell was a member of the 78th Regiment of Foot, or Fraser’s Highlanders. This paperwork places William together with Major James Abercrombie of the 78th.
Secondly, I also have paperwork which will prove Marie Josephte Chartier (b. 1732) to be the daughter of Louis Chartier and Marie Madeleine Lefebvre dit Boulanger. This will finally put to rest any theories about Marie being the daughter of anyone else.
Finally, I have definitive paperwork which lists William’s full name as Alexander William Campbell. I find this quite compelling, because this is the first instance where we see a different forename for him.
All documentation is archived on the LDS website, http://www.familysearch.org, located on William’s personal ‘Memories’ page. William’s PID# is: KP3R-TZJ.
Or, you can contact me directly and I’ll be happy to email anyone these recently discovered documents from the Quebec National Archives.
Best,

Jeffrey

This is the proof he sent me in a PDF form.

Campbell & Chartier Inheritence 1793

To contact me so I can contact Jeffrey…

What?

I got this message from a friend to whom I had sent what I had just posted this morning…


Wow, Pierre you have found a most important part of RCAF history.

This is pure “Gold.”

The reorganization of the Canadian Air Force [the fifth] officially adopted the “Royal” on 1 April 1924, and the RCAF was born.

On 19 May 1925, the Ottawa Privy council authorized the establishment of six service squadrons, for use to fulfill the operational duties of many government departments. Yes, our RCAF first began to operate as a non-military agency of the Canadian Government, opened air routes, experimented in air mail, transported government officials, carried ‘treaty money’ to the Indians, patrolled fishing, hunting, and forestry, flew sick and injured trappers and Indians, from remote sites, and photographed the first vast areas of wilderness in Canada. 

The first six RCAF squadrons included – H.Q. at Ottawa, No. 1 Flying Station, Camp Borden, [training]  No. 1 Operations Wing, Winnipeg, [which you have in your photos] and No. 3 Operations [photo] Squadron, Rockcliffe, Ontario, [which became the first to test and develop photographic equipment in Canadian aircraft] Wow, you have all these first images, taken by No. 3 RCAF Photo Unit, pure gold my friend. This is huge to me, and I’m sure someone in Ottawa will be in contact with you.

Attached you will find the aircraft info. from the book “RCAF Squadrons and Aircraft” National Museum of Man, Ottawa, 1977.

On 1 July 1927, the Directorate of Civil Government Air Operations [DCGAO] took over all air operations, which became Federal Government aircraft, etc. It was in fact a ‘paper’ air force and the RCAF did most of the work.

You have captured and preserved that small forgotten part of our early [first] RCAF squadron history. They were a photo section, so, they had lots of film, etc. paid by the Canadian government, that saved our history.

This is huge, keep up the good work, your site is doing so much good for Canadians.

Clarence


It made my day!

Where in the world did my grandparents get married?

In 2007 that was sort of an obsession.

Where in the world did my grandparents get married?

They never did get married!

leo-2-ans-avec-sa-mere-juliette-mod

My father with the sailor uniform is with my grandmother Juliette just behind (circa 1929)

But before I found that out, I had searched near and far for my paternal grandfather’s father and mother. I had search on the Internet, on databanks, on genealogy forums, on several genealogy Websites, on U.S. and Canadian censuses, on Find a Grave…

I made hypotheses like where did my grandfather, who was also my godfather, had picked up my given name? 

Pierre…

This is how I met Blanche and Frobe for the first time. People I didn’t know had ever existed.

Then someone shared this old picture as she was somewhat related to the Lagasses.

Frobe Lagasse is on the right in the first row and Blanche is the baby being held by her mother Valéda Forand.

How I found out about Frobe Lagasse?

His father was Pierre Adolphe Lagacé. I had known back in 2009 who were finally my grandfather’s father and mother, but I had kept a close eye on that other branch. I did not want all this research to go to waste so I wrote about it.

Pierre Adolphe was the son of Pierre Lagacé (another Pierre) and Marcelline David.

14 March 1851

Pierre was born in 1825 according to this headstone.

Headstones are a secondary source because errors are sometimes found.

His brother Stanislas (Stanislas I), born in 1816, was my great-great-grandfather. Stanislas died March 28, 1900.

This could very well be where I got my given name, from my great-great-grandfather’s brother. Or was it because my great-grandfather Stanislas (Stanislas II) had a brother who was also named Pierre?  

I know by looking at this old picture that Stanislas II and his brother Pierre seemed very close, at least on a park bench…

Pierre (1845- ?) and Stanislas II (1842-1927)

I could never find out when Pierre died. That’s the “?”.

I know a lot about my side of the family, but I don’t know everything.

I know also a lot about Pierre Adolphe seen here on an image I took from the Internet in 2010, but I don’t know everything.

Sometimes people find this blog and start writing. Then they stop writing…like the person who sent me this and said he had more.

I don’t mind waiting because what I find I share for future generations. I understand why some people are not interested in finding their roots, but when they do and write a comment on this blog…

Amazing photographs!  I am partial I suppose as I also have 5 sons!  Thank you for sharing these!  I had the names of Frobe’s parents but nothing further, so that is wonderful as well!

 

I start writing…and sharing.

Comment on an old post written 6 years ago…

This is a comment left yesterday on an old post written 6 years ago…

Amazing photographs!  I am partial I suppose as I also have 5 sons!  Thank you for sharing these!  I had the names of Frobe’s parents but nothing further, so that is wonderful as well!

It was left after Stephanie read this post.


This article was supposed to be published on May 31th 2010. I thought that the story was over…

Read the article because there is more to it later on.

This is the closing chapter of Idala LaGasse’s story…

Sometimes you find something precious…

Alyce has something that is very precious.

Her grandfather wrote to his son David, Alyce’s father.

That was 63 years ago. Idala was 77 years-old and David was 31.

The letter is in French.

Alyce is learning French as well as the rudiments of genealogy.

She hit the jackpot twice since her third cousin is a retired teacher and now a freelance translator as well as an amateur genealogist seriously addicted to genealogy.

Alyce translated her grandfather’s letter. Pierre gave her an A- and helped her a little bit.

This is now the finish product.

You will learn a lot about Idala by reading it…

New Bedford, Mass

February 2, 1947

David LaGasse


Dear son

We have received your nice letter of 28 January. We are happy to know that your health is very good and that everything is running smoothly.

May God be blessed because happiness is a blessing that comes from heaven and deserves great appreciation.

You told me in your last letter that you prefer a private letter [instead of a postcard]. What a coincidence because I also prefer that but when I receive a postcard, I use the same method to answer back. It is not that I don’t have any paper because I have a lot.

I am happy to know of your good disposition and the suggestions that you make at the moment. You have all we need right now. The pension we receive right now is 82 dollars each month which is enough for us. Despite the raise in the cost of living, we are very well and our health is good for our age. We thank God for this.

I am pleased to know the good thoughts that you have for your mother who, in turn, loves each one of you equally as if you were her own children.

This was my most profound desire when I got married: a good spouse, a good mother, a good husband and good children make for a good household and peace everywhere.

We must then thank God for all these blessings.

Rose is not working anymore. She is resting for awhile. Eugene is still working and he behaves well.

Samuel still has his new business and he is well

Bob and Florence are both working. They are well.

Respectfully,

Your father


Now Stephanie left another comment which prompted me to write her a personal email. Her comment was left after she read about an undertaker…

I have edited the original a little.

https://steanne.wordpress.com/2009/12/13/george-lagasse-undertaker-in-massachusetts-in-1909/