Family secrets

We all have them don’t we?

My closet is full of them but I rarely write about them. I also rarely write about other people’s family secrets.

Susan has been commenting on my blog since 2012…

Hi Pierre,
I am so glad you never give up looking for ancestors! I just know that one day you will find Joseph and Edwina (Newcity) Lagassee. I still haven’t been able to find anything on their son Robert, but I will continue my search….
Have a nice day,
Susan

Susan sent me this newspaper clipping about Wilfred Nevue’s second marriage on September 5th, 1899.

Funny anecdote isn’t…? I wonder if Marilda knew about Wilfred Neveu’s past.

The newspaper misspelled Thibodeau, but Wilfred got his surname back, although he will become Wilfred Nevin in 1905.

This is why genealogy is so confusing sometimes.
Wilfrid Neveu, aka Wilfred Nevue, aka Wilfred Nevin, aka Winnifred Nevan died on July 9, 1905 from pulmonary tuberculosis.

It’s easy to get confused when you put all these documents together.
Wilfred died on July 9th which was a Sunday. The newspaper wrote about his funeral happening on a Wednesday (12 July), and he was buried the same day he died on the 9th? Confused? Newspapers are sometimes wrong, but this is what our detective friend believes.

Wilfred Nevue est mort de tuberculose le 9 juillet 1905, ses funérailles ont eu lieu à son domicile le mercredi 12 juillet, et la découpure du journal au sujet du lieu de son enterrement indique la date de son décès et non la date de son enterrement.

Wilfred Nevue died of tuberculosis on July 9th, 1905, his funeral was held at his home on Wednesday July 12th, and the newspaper clipping about where he is buried had the date he died not when he was buried there.
Wilfred Nevue died 113 years ago and he is still making news.
Footnote about Marilda

Footnote about Wilfred Nevue’s second son Wilfred Nevin who twice divorced and married three times…

Footnote about Wilfred Nevue’s brother Eldridge (Eldège)

More about Eldege…

Pioneer of Butte is Summoned

Eldege Nevin, 81, Resident 60 Years

Eldege Nevin, 81, pioneer resident of Butte, died in a local hospital Saturday morning. A native of Montreal, Canada, Mr. Nevin had lived in Butte for 60 years.

He married Emma Guay on 24 October 1889. They were the parents of Lydia, Ida, Mamie, Ernest, Joseph, Emery, Evan and Elore.

On his 50th wedding anniversary in 1939, the local newspaper noted: “Next Saturday October 21, will mark the 50th anniversary of the marriage at St. Patrick’s church of Mr. and Mrs. Nevin, 1963 Roberts Street. That night they will be guests at a reception in their honor at the IOOF hall on Front Street. Several of their children, 28 grandchildren and four great grandchildren will be present, in addition to scores of close friends.

Mr. Nevin was born in Canada July 19, 1862 and came to Butte in November 1884. His wife, also was a native of Canada, born July 4, 1866. ‘I think that makes me a good American’ she said yesterday, referring to her birthday.”

Mr. Nevin worked in the Heinze smelter until it closed down. He later was employed by the Butte Floral company and the Largey Lumber company. He was a teamster by occupation.

Family secrets?
I have learned since 2009 that nobody’s perfect and we should not be too judgemental even if it still hurts.

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3 thoughts on “Family secrets

  1. Yes, family secrets, we all have them. As a “family historian ” we have to decide what to do with those secrets. As an historian you want the truth revealed but as a human being we don’t want to hurt relatives that would be devastated by the truth so you have to make a judgment call.
    There are facts that I know being kept in my files hoping a future family historian will find my information and will be able to add the truth to the family tree because the generation that would have been devastated are all long gone and the new generation will see it just as a fact of their family’s history.
    These are the issues a family historian struggles with more often than most people would realize because he/she is a human being and not just an historian.

    • That’s why I always hesitate, but in this case I decided to go ahead because I know Susan would not mind telling this story of her grandfather’s father who abandoned his son and wife.

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