I Give Up!

Do you really mean it when you hit a brick wall?

I don’t.

The story of that picture is on this blog which might be hard to find unless you use the search button on the right side.

Having written more than 1200 posts it’s like looking for a needle in a haystack. Fanie Lupien’s name did not give me any headache, just a little…

Elmire Brault’s name is what got me curious when I visited St. Joseph Cemetery with 3rd cousin Joe. Visiting that cemetery was sort of an epiphany…

An epiphany (from the ancient Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, “manifestation, striking appearance”) is an experience of sudden and striking realisation. Generally the term is used to describe scientific breakthrough, religious or philosophical discoveries, but it can apply in any situation in which an enlightening realization allows a problem or situation to be understood from a new and deeper perspective. Epiphanies are studied by psychologists[1][2] and other scholars, particularly those attempting to study the process of innovation.[3][4][5]

Epiphanies are relatively rare occurrences and generally follow a process of significant thought about a problem. Often they are triggered by a new and key piece of information, but importantly, a depth of prior knowledge is required to allow the leap of understanding.[3][4][6][7] Famous epiphanies include Archimedes‘s discovery of a method to determine the density of an object (“Eureka!”) and Isaac Newton‘s realization that a falling apple and the orbiting moon are both pulled by the same force.[6][7][8]

Epiphany that was Fanie Lupien’s real first name… Well sort of…

Fanie was Épiphane. He was named after Epiphanius of Salamis which is found on Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphanius_of_Salamis

Fanie is remembered on a list of families of St. Ann parish in Bristol that I posted here on this blog.

Here is it again in a PDF form.

(familles de la paroisse de Ste-Anne à Bristol)

Today’s post “I give up!” is just a pun because I know I will never give up unless people stop writing me like Kathy did.

This is pretty old, but I was wondering if anyone has more info on Fanie Lupien and his family/descendants.

About this addiction of mine…?

How did Elmire Brault died?

The story continues next Saturday with a picture.

Alexina Breault with Zéphir Choinière

5 thoughts on “I Give Up!

  1. Hi Pierre, Had a similar problem recently with Fibroni. Febroni, Phibroni, Phebroni which turned out to be Marie Ephebronie Charbonneau.
    Cheers my friend

  2. I’m very glad that I found you on Ancestry and on this wonderful blog!

    My husband’s family trees named him as Frank – or since they knew he emigrated from Quebec, they assumed his full name had been François. Searching on either Frank Lupien or François Lupien with the approximate birthdate and known residence gave lousy results for most non-Census records. So that line stopped completely at that point.

    Like others, I easily found “Frank” and the four children who survived past early childhood (including my husband’s great grandfather) in the same household in Bristol in the 1900 Census. When I looked at the actual record image, I noticed that he and his wife Josephine had only been married for 8 years while the children ranged in age from 11-17, and that her listing said that 0 children had been born to her – so it was clear that the four children must have been born to “Frank” in a previous marriage. But there is no 1890 Census and none of the children from 1900 were old enough to have been alive in 1880, so I had to get very creative with my search parameters. Eventually I found Elmire (Brault) Lupien’s death record and that’s when things started to fall into place – every record I found seemed to add more evidence that the person called Frank Lupien in my husband’s family tree was actually Fanie Lupien.

    This is the joy of genealogy; to find clues like this and make connections between them. All it takes is one “epiphany” to solve the puzzle!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s