Where to start?

Here of course…

http://heritage.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.lac_reel_c12209/89?r=0&s=3

Once you start reading, you just can’t stop finding…

Click here…

Excerpt

For about two and a half years postwar, Apps supervised a construction crew of approximately 100 in building the Imperial Wireless Chain. A short-term job in Canada followed. In the meantime, Apps applied to the Royal Canadian Air Force. He joined his old commander “Billy” Barker in the new air force on 19 March 1924. After a round of assignments to Winnipeg, Victoria Beach, Barrie, and Norway House, he was posted to an aerial survey project in 1926, tasked to photograph 25,000 square miles (65,000 km2) in the Red Lake District.[1]

 

I should be going “EZ” on my readers

Note

I wrote this before I got an email telling me that I had Pure Gold!

Wow, Pierre you have found a most important part of RCAF history.

This is pure “Gold.”

 

 

R.C.A.F.
Holts Point
Minaki Ontario
Summer 1927

I should be going “EZ” on my readers, but I  just can’t do it since I started documenting long lost pictures in January 2017.

There’s a lesson in each scene,

A story in each bower and stream.

There’s a lesson in each scene,

A story in each bower and stream.

 

What Charlotte M. Campbell did was to preserve the past. She didn’t have to do it and create a photo album with all the neatly written captions she wrote, even if I found one caption that was wrong!

1928
Holst Point, Ont.

Ross didn’t have to contact me, but he did because he wanted to know more about the album he had saved from being lost forever. All the photos in the album have never found their way on the Internet before January 2017.

Every week I have been just awestruck by what I had find about those photographs from the past. I was a bit confused at times, but now I see clearer skies ahead.

Speaking of what I found yesterday…

I think I have found who was the pilot flying C-GYET on July 11th, 1927. He’s not this man.

That’s the elusive Bill ? with his friend Jim ? and his wife Margaret ?. The dead pilot is on that photo.

You remembered what happened on that day 90 years ago?


Breaking news

Found yesterday on the Internet

July 1927 a Vickers Viking aeroplane was struck by lightning and crashed near Hilbre, Manitoba. Three airmen, A.T. Bradley, W.C. Weaver and F.H. Wrong lost their lives in the fatal crash. Debris was scattered in all directions. when the plane was struck it was travelling at an elevation of about 2,000 feet.


Wilmington News-Journal Ohio 1927-07-12
Hilbre, MB Lightning Strikes Plane, July 1927

THINK LIGHTNING BOLT STRUCK PLANE, HURLING THREE TO DEATH.
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE AVIATORS WERE MAKING TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEY.

Winnipeg, July 12 – (AP) – Exploding in mid-air a hydroplane of the Royal Air Force burst into flames and in four separate pieces crashed to the ground near Hilbre, Man., yesterday, bringing death to three men. The dead are: Flight Officer W. C. WEAVER, pilot. A. T. HARDLEY, photographic mechanic. and F. H. WRONG, surveyor of the Topographical Survey Branch, Ottawa. Eye witnesses say the plane entered a heavy cloud bank and was lost to view. Soon there was a loud explosion and three bodies came hurtling through the air, followed by the separate pieces of the plane, afire like huge rockets. Officers of the Royal Canadian Air Force in Winnipeg today expressed the opinion that the plane had been struck by lightning. The plane was believed to have been at an altitude of almost 3,500 feet when the explosion occurred. One of the victims was found buried head first in the ground. One of the airmen had a parachute strapped on but evidently had no time to use it. The aviators were making a topographical survey of the Hilbre district.


Reno Evening Gazette  – July 12, 1927, Reno, Nevada

Canadian Air Surveyors in Manitoba, 3500 Feet up,
Meet with Death Bodies Hurtle from Mist to Ground before Eyes Of Startled Observers

WINNIPEG, Manitoba 11 July 1927

Exploding in mid-air a hydro airplane of the Royal Force burst into flames and in four pieces crashed to the ground near Hilbre, Manitoba yesterday, bring death to three men.The dead are: Flight Officer W. C. Weaver, pilot in charge; A.T. Bradley, photographic mechanic, and F. H. Wrong, surveyor of the topographical survey branch, Ottawa.-

EXPLODES IN CLOUD

Witnesses say the plane entered a heavy, cloud bank and was lost to view. Shortly after there was a loud explosion and three bodies came hurtling through the air followed by the pieces of the plane, afire like rockets. The flaming, gasoline tank separated from the machine. Officers of the Royal Canadian air force in Winnipeg today expressed the opinion that the plane had been struck by lightning. The accident occurred over a farm a short distance from Hilbre, which is northwest of Winnipeg on the north shore of Lake Manitoba.

FALL OF 3500 FEET

The plane was believed to have been at an altitude almost 3500 feet when the explosion occurred. One of the victims was found buried head first in the ground. Nearby another body was found and a short distance away: a third was discovered in the grass.” One of the airmen has a parachute strapped on but evidently had no time to use it. Parts of the machine were half buried in the ground and debris was scattered over wide area. The pontoons were found one hundred yards from the main portion of the plane.

WERE SURVEYORS

The aviators had taken off from Winnipegosis during the morning, a topographical survey of the Hilbre district. It came from the Lac-du-Bonnet station of the Royal Canadian Air forces, where forestry and survey planes are stationed during the summer months. It was a single engined Vickers Viking of the pusher type with the propeller at the rear of the wings. Preparations for an investigation are under way and Flight Lieut. L. T. Stevenson of headquarters staff here left tonight for the scene of the tragedy.


WINNIPEG. July 11

Exploding in midair, a hydroplane of the Royal Canadian Air Force burst into flames and in four separate pieces crashed to the ground near Hilbre, Man., today, bringing death to three men — Flight Officer W. C. Weaver, pilot in charge; A. T. Bradley, photographic mechanic, and F. H. Wrong, surveyor of the Topographical Survey Branch, Ottawa.

Many persons witnessed the tragedy, the worst of its kind in the history of Manitoba. Watching the plane’s progress over the district, eye witnesses said it entered into a heavy cloud bank and was lost to view. Immediately there was a loud explosion and three bodies came hurtling through the air, followed by the separate pieces of the plane, afire and like huge rockets. The flaming gasoline tank separated from the machine.

Officers of the Royal Canadian Air Force in Winnipeg tonight expressed the opinion that the plane had been struck by lightning. The accident occurred over a farm a short distance from Hilbre which is northwest of Winnipeg, near the shore of Lake Manitoba. It is estimated the hydroplane was at an altitude of 3,500 feet when the explosion destroyed the plane.


To be continued…