More than a house – More than pictures

Linking with the past…

Our Ancestors

Posting once a week and only about How I found your ancestors might be harder than I first thought.

Anyway…

Our roots are deeper than we think.

Acadia House

Acadian House

Médard Myers

Medard Myers’ family

Medard Myers is a direct descendant of René Hébert.

Medard N Myers

So is little Germaine Lagasse.

Germaine Lagasse

1915

Germaine’s mother, Alice D. Myers, is the little girl in front of her father Medard N. Myers.

Médard Myers

1891

She was as such a descendant of René Hébert, and she probably never learned about her Acadian roots.

For more on Acadian House, click here.

Excerpt

In the past, there have been several articles written about the Acadians, who for a time resided in Guilford, Connecticut, but none of them have answered the question–“What are their names?”

That information can be answered, at least in part, but first; a little history is in order.

Britain had won Nova Scotia from the French in 1713, so…

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Love Story – Redux

A comment made on this post about the Acadian House…

I recently discovered I descended from John and Anastasie via my Remillard line (their daughter Cecile married Louis Marie Remillard).  In another small world circumstance, I live in the next town over.  I’m a cyclist and for over two decades rode past the Acadian House in Guilford, never giving it much thought.  Needless to say, I now often wonder what stories that home can tell. 

There’s a certain poetic justice to John and Anastasie’s story, and there’s something to be said about the type of men the Smith brothers were, leaving their lives in the British colonies with their Acadian brides for a land and culture no doubt foreign to them.   In another twist, John’s maternal grandmother was Mary Forbes, who I believe was the sister of Captain Samuel Forbes, the shipbuilder who captained the ship that brought the Hebert family to CT. 

A great story where love triumphed, and the world is much smaller than we sometimes realize!

More on the Acadian House

Acadian House

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ct0148.photos.023807p/

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ct0148.photos.023808p/

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ct0148.photos.023809p/

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/hhh.ct0148.photos.023810p/

Final link…

Ensign E.R. Grinndal U.S. Navy – Course No. 35 No. 51 O.T.U. Cranfield

About Richard Grinndal

RAF 23 Squadron

Ensign Grinndal

collection Flight Lieutenant John Kelly U.S. Navy

51 OTU Ensign Grinndal

R.C. Harris log book

On 14 August 1944, Squadron Leader MacAndrew took off with Beaufighter I serial number 7775. Navigator R.C. Harris was the navigator radar operator instructor. Ensign E.R. Grinndal U.S. Navy was part of the crew.

What follows is something I found on the Internet in 2013. The Website does not exist anymore. Just in case I had copied the following…

I am so glad I did!

***

During October 68 Squadron made up for all the frustration of the two previous months as they shot down 13 Flying-bombs. The crews were as follows: Fg Off Haskell/Plt Off Bentley – three; Fg Off Humphrey/Fg Off Robertson – two; F/Sgt Bullus/Fg Off Edwards -one; W/O Lauchlan/F/Sgt Bailey – two; Fg Off Gibson/Sgt Lack – one; Sqn Ldr Wright/Fg Off McCullough – two; and Sqn Ldr Mansfeld/Flt Lt Janacek – two.

Part of…

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Richard Grinndal remembered

This is a sequel about someone I wrote a post on this blog.

Read the post first, then the comment made.

***

Probably not that important that I should write about this person.

I have learned since 2009 that everything I write on this blog is for a reason. I am the one who benefits the most from all this writing I have been doing since 2009.

I have learned so much about myself and others that I have a hard time stopping writing.

So what is all about Richard Grinndal who died on November 22, 1944 and probably left no descendants to remember him by.

I have started writing about him on my blog about No. 23 Squadron. If you have been reading that blog, you know why I wrote it in the first place.

If not click here.

So what about Richard Eric Grinndal?

1940 U.S. Census Richard Grinndal

 

You tell me because I know very little about him.

***

Comment

Richard Grinndal was my uncle whom I never knew. I was born two months after he died. My middle name is Richard, after him. I often wonder how my life would have been different had he lived. He held BS & MS degrees in engineering, a Phi Beta Kappa key & was well liked by many including his flying buddies. I am my family’s keeper of the many photos, letters & other mementos from him including his letters home, burial flag, etc. He & his pilot Sam Peebles shot down V-1 flying bombs & I have copies of action reports describing how they did it. Their Mosquito crashed on take-off flying one last mission after his requirement was fulfilled. The main point is that he was a good man, brilliant & well thought of, who would have made a much greater contribution to our society.

ensign-grinndal

The Dash

By Linda Ellis

​I read of a man who stood to speak at the funeral of a friend. He referred to the dates on the tombstone from the beginning…to the end.

He noted that first came the date of birth and spoke the following date with tears, but he said what mattered most of all was the dash between those years.

For that dash represents all the time that they spent alive on earth. And now only those who loved them know what that little line is worth.

For it matters not, how much we own, the cars… the house… the cash. What matters is how we live and love and how we spend our dash.

So, think about this long and hard. Are there things you’d like to change? For you never know how much time is left that can still be rearranged.

If we could just slow down enough to consider what’s true and real and always try to understand ​the way other people feel.

And be less quick to anger and show appreciation more and love the people in our lives like we’ve never loved before.

If we treat each other with respect and more often wear a smile, remembering that this special dash might only last a little while.

​So, when your eulogy is being read, with your life’s actions to rehash… would you be proud of the things they say about how you spent YOUR dash?

​Copyright 1996 Linda Ellis

image

Courtesy Gracie Ann Matisyn

three-myers.jpg.jpeg

Collection Steve Myers