Sandy’s Contribution

I know I have a lot of favorite third cousins down South, but Sandy is at the top of the list with my third cousin Joe breathing down her neck.

Sandy’s middle name has to be Discretion…

She discretely added some information on my Ancestry family tree. I know she must have told me about it, but I kind of forgot since she is such a discrete person.

Anyway…

Marie-Anne Lagassa (Lagasse) married Herman Farmer on November 8 1880 in Waterbury, Vermont.

1880 marriage Mary Lagassa

Marie-Anne was still living with Stanislas Lagacé 1816 when the 1880 U.S. Census was taken.

1880 MaryLagassa

Censuses are so fascinating because of all the information you can find. Like Agnes Lagasse, Stanislas 1816’s other daughter, who married Julian Myers.

They are next-door neighbors and these two are next on the list for my next search!

1880 Agnes Lagassa

And I wanted to take a break this summer on this blog…

Maybe this fall… or when snow starts falling in Quebec.

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In Search Of Marie-Anne…

Why not go on a search for Marie-Anne’s descendants?

Sandy sent me a message yesterday about Marie-Anne Lagasse. She had entered some information on my Ancestry tree.

I have no picture of Marie-Anne nor of her father, my great-great-grandfather Stanislas Lagacé (1816) who bears the same given name as my great-grandfather Stanislas Lagacé who I call Stanislas 1842 since he also named one of his sons Stanislas who I call Stanislas 1864.

This is all I have of Stanislas 1816… his certificate of death and some census pages.

Stanislas Lagacé 1816-1900

If I write that much about my ancestors and also yours, it’s because there are probably some pictures of Stanislas 1816 hidden somewhere in an old dusty wooden chest behind a pile of old objects in a dark attic somewhere in the U.S. that some of Marie-Anne’s descendants have and can’t figure out who is who on those old pictures…

I can!

 

Stanis Lagassey’s Log Cabin

No picture of the one-story log cabin, but the 1861 Census is showing that Stanislas Lagacé (1816-1900) was living in a log cabin with his little family.

I will make you believe that this is his log cabin even though this is a two-story log cabin…

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Why can’t I make you believe that my great-great-grandfather lived in this log cabin?

I can rewrite history like the Port Huron Museum did with Mitchell Lagassa’s log cabin.

This is a page taken from the 1861 Canadian Census in Missiquoi County before Canada was even born (1867).

1861 Stanis Lagassey

This is a real document taken on this Website. It’s the first time it is available on the Internet.

Pure gold!

Stanislas Lagacé, who was a farmer in Stanbridge, has his name entered as Stanis Lagassey. But I know this is my great-great-grandfather. He is 46 years old and he is living with his wife Onésime Cadieux whose given name is Elisebeth. I can’t figure that one out. I don’t think my great-great-grandfather had two wives.

Maybe he did after all…

No that’s impossible because I would have found it!

Anyway the Lagassey family is all there in 1861.

Philomène, 20, who married J. B. Alexandre Senior…

Philomène Lagacé

Dennis, 19, my great-grandfather…

Dennis Lagasse II

Peter, 17, who married Mathilde Leblanc. She died from cholera in 1884.

Pierre Lagasse

Elmira, 15…

Joseph, 13, who is Joseph Miller Lagasse. He married Edwina Newcity… and he died when he was 99 years-old.

Joseph Lagasse and Edwina Newcity

Agnes, 9…

Lewis, 8, who is Louis Lagasse. He married Rose Myers…

Anthony, 6, who would die on March 6, 1861…

Exivia, 3, who was François-Xavier. He married Sophie Archambault…

Sophie Archambeault

Only one chill is missing. Marie-Anne born on December 15, 1862.

I never talked that much about her. Maybe I should and help someone get reunited with his ancestors.

What do you think?

http://www.danhebert.com/

A little publicity can’t hurt.

Click here.

Dan Hebert, whose a distant cousin, has a Website dedicated to his ancestors.

Dan does not sell anything. He only shares ancestors and pictures like I do.

He seems to be have seen sharing since 1999.

Dan Hebert

Dan Hebert has these Lagassas with pictures!

L
Lagassa, Edward Family

Mitchell Lagassa

Lagassa, Mary

Mary Lagassa

Lagassa, Mitchell Family

Mitchell Lagassa

Lagassa, Olive

Olive

Olive Lagassa

 Footnote

I can’t tell you how impressive Dan’s research is and how helpful he was putting some pieces of the LaGasa’s puzzle together.

Mitchell Lagassa’s Cabin… The Sequel

Dan Hebert added this piece of information last night on Facebook…

Michael was born in May of 1854 and on 2 Dec 1878 he married Margaret Chauvin. In a small book titled the History of Grindstone City, the author wrote that when Michael and Margaret were married, he and his father and other family members built a log cabin as a wedding gift. 

Between 1879 and 1888 Michael & Margaret had four children. In the great fire of 1880 many homes in Huron county were destroyed by the forest fire Michael and Margaret’s cabin survived and several of the Lagassa family members lived with Michael and Margaret while they rebuilt. 

I have noticed that many documents interchange the name Michael’s with Mitchell’s , so you really need to understand the context the name is used. Mitchell Lagassa is the one who built the cabin.

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Open-and-shut case…

Grindstone City?

Mitchell Lagassa’s Cabin

Mitchell Lagassa is the one who built the cabin.

But whose Mitchell are we talking about?

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Things can get pretty complicated when several people give at birth the same given name to a child or a grandchild.

Mitchell Lagassa (1854-1940) was the son of Michel Lagacé (1817-1905) and Delia Roch or Roche (1823-1905).

Eliza Jane Wilson

I’m not sure if I am following all this…

This is two of Delia’s grandsons: Mitchell (1877-1941) on the left and John Benjamin (1882-1951) on the right.

Mitchell and John LaGasa

Both are Joseph Lagassa’s sons seen here on this family picture that started all this frenzy.

Joseph LaGasa

Joseph Lagassa’s and Eliza Jane Wilson’s family

Joseph Lagassa (1841-1920) is Koeni LaGasa’s great-great-grandfather. Joseph is Mitchell Lagassa’s brother. This is the Mitchell who built the cabin house and not Michel Lagacé (1817-1905), Delia’s husband.

Eliza Jane Wilson

Crystal…

In Huron City, Michigan there is a log cabin built by the Mitchell Lagassa Family. The museum claims that the cabin was built by Mitchell and Delia in 1837 when they first got married and raised their 17 children — This is not correct the cabin was built for Mitchell son Michael & Margaret 1878. In 1880 a major wild fire burned out many families. Several of the Lagassa family members had to live with Michael and Margaret while they rebuilt their homes — I think this is where the 17 children count comes from.. In side the Log cabin are two pictures that claim to be Mitchell and Delia — So if you are ever in Huron City — Stop by and take a look. 

Dan Hebert

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Log Cabin

The cabin is the oldest building in Huron City. Mitchell and Delia LaGassa built the cabin in 1837, the year they were married. The LaGassa’s raised their seventeen children and celebrated their 75th wedding anniversary in this cabin

Since Mitchell Lagassa (1817-1905) aka Michel Lagacé and Delia were not married in 1837 but in 1840, and not living in Michigan, the people managing the museum are dead wrong.

I wrote the museum organizer and explain why his information was incorrect, but he chose not to correct it.. his version sounds better I guess.

Dan Hebert

Writing the museum organizer again about all the research done on these peop;e would be a waist of my time.

Writing my blog is much more constructing.

 John B Lagassa

John Benjamin LaGasa middle of the front row
with his fellow construction workers 

Footnote

If you never read the comment section…

Very interesting story Pierre, I can see where this cabin had an upstairs in it, you can tell by the black squares on the outside wall that show just above the door and windows.

Ron

Who is Ron?

Like a twin brother…

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Cabin?

Yes, cabin…

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Dan Hebert posted this log cabin picture on Facebook with this message for all to read.

In Huron City, Michigan there is a log cabin built by the Mitchell Lagassa Family. The museum claims that the cabin was built by Mitchell and Delia in 1837 when they first got married and raised their 17 children — This is not correct the cabin was built for Mitchell son Michael & Margaret 1878. In 1880 a major wild fire burned out many families. Several of the Lagassa family members had to live with Michael and Margaret while they rebuilt their homes — I think this is where the 17 children count comes from.. In side the Log cabin are two pictures that claim to be Mitchell and Delia — So if you are ever in Huron City — Stop by and take a look. 

He took it from this Website.

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Log Cabin

The cabin is the oldest building in Huron City. Mitchell and Delia LaGassa built the cabin in 1837, the year they were married. The LaGassa’s raised their seventeen children and celebrated their 75th wedding anniversary in this cabin

The problem is that Mitchell Lagassa aka Michel Lagacé and Delia were not marriedin 1837. They got married in 1840 and they were not living in Michigan.

Dan told this to the people managing the museum.

I wrote the museum organizer and explain why his information was incorrect, but he chose not to correct it.. his version sounds better I guess.

I guess we don’t have to write the museum organizer again about all the research we have done on that branch of Lagacés.

Mitchell and John LaGasa

 Guess not…

Catch Me if You Can… Take 3

I would really wish if someone could send me a picture of Henriette Alexandre, my great-grandmother.

I know this is not her.

Eliza Jane Wilson

Catch me if you can…

She is Delia Roch or Roche, Grandpa Lagasa’s mother.

That’s what is written on the back.

back of picture

Grandpa would be John Benjamin LaGasa seen here with his brother Mitchell.

Mitchell and John LaGasa

Koeni has resurfaced on Facebook.

I thought I had scared him away with all my posts about his ancestors.

Koeni has sent me this message after being AWOL for almost two weeks…

Ok. I have been missing a lot of info. Sorry I have been busy lately. I guess I have to take a trip back east to see this cabin now. 

Cabin?

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Time to Reflect Upon Stress

My cousin Joe sent me this… with this quote he always puts at the end.

Paul Harvey: “If there is a 50-50 chance that something can go wrong, then 9 times out of ten it will.”

Great Lesson on Stress

A young lady confidently walked around the room with a raised glass of water while leading a seminar and explaining stress management to her audience. Everyone knew she was going to ask the ultimate question,  ‘Half empty or half full?’ She fooled them all. “How heavy is this glass of water?” she inquired with a smile.  Answers called out ranged from 8 oz. to 20 oz.   She replied, “The absolute weight doesn’t matter.
It depends on how long I hold it.   If I hold it for a minute, that’s not a problem.
If I hold it for an hour, I’ll have an ache in my right arm.If I hold it for a day, you’ll have to call an ambulance.  In each case it’s the same weight, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes.”

She continued, “and that’s the way it is with stress.  If we carry our burdens all the time, sooner or later, as the burden becomes increasingly heavy, we won’t be able to carry on.”

“As with the glass of water, you have to put it down for a while and rest before holding it again. When we’re refreshed, we can carry on with the burden – holding stress longer and better each time practiced.

So, as early in the evening as you can, put all your burdens down.  Don’t carry them through the evening and into the night.   Pick them up again tomorrow if you must.

1 * Accept the fact that some days you’re the pigeon, and some days you’re the statue!

2 * Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them.

3 * Always read stuff that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.

4 * Drive carefully… It’s not only cars that can be recalled by their Maker.

5 * If you can’t be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.

6 * If you lend someone $20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it.

7 * It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

8 * Never buy a car you can’t push.

9 * Never put both feet in your mouth at the same time, because then you won’t have a leg to stand on.

10 * Nobody cares if you can’t dance well.   Just get up and dance.

11 * Since it’s the early worm that gets eaten by the bird, sleep late.

12 * The second mouse gets the cheese.

13 * When everything’s coming your way, you’re in the wrong lane.

14 * Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.

16 * Some mistakes are too much fun to make only once.

17 * We could learn a lot from crayons.  Some are sharp, some are pretty and some are dull. Some have weird names and all are different colors, but they all have to live in the same box.

18 * A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour.

19 * Have an awesome day and know that someone has thought about you today.

 

James Arthur LaGasa

U.S. Marine Corps

Enlisted October 1942

Bob Barrette had that information on his family tree about Arthur LaGasa’s son.

I got curious.

James A Lagasa
Muster Date: October 1942
Enlistment Date: 13 October 1942
Rank: Private First Class
Station: Platoon Leaders Unit, 13th Reserve District, Mb, Psnyd, Bremerton, Wash.

James Arthur LaGasa, 15 years-old, was living with his father in Cordova, Alaska, in 1940. November 11th, 1939 according to this document.

1940 Arthur J LaGasa

He was with his father in 1938 when the Polar Bear had problems.

Blown ashore after suffering engine trouble and hitting a reef. CG cutter Morris found crew of Capt. A.J. LaGasa, J.A. LaGasa, Alex Woche, and Paul Anderson camped on beach. This was the Polar Bear’s first trip after being raised after hitting a reef and sinking off Kodiak in 1935. The Morris tried to convoy the Polar Bear to Cape Spencer, but, when 30 mi out to sea, the wooden propeller that LaGasa had whittled from a tree dropped off, the Morris was forced to tow the Polar Bear to Sawmill Bay where it awaited a two-blade, 40″ steel metal prop built by Jack English at the machine shop

James Arthur LaGasa became a U.S. Marine in 1942.

We have no picture nor stories to share.

J. A. LaGasa died at the age of 42 in 1966, the same year as his father Captain Arthur J. LaGasa, leaving no descendants to remember him. 

LaGasa, 1966 Nov 25