Grain of Salt

Someone added her grain of salt to Joe’s message…

All I I have to say about that is I’d like to share this from Wikipedia if ok…

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Simplified parse tree
PN = proper noun
N = noun
V = verb
NP = noun phrase
RC = relative clause
VP = verb phrase
S = sentence

“Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo” is a grammatically valid sentence in American English, used as an example of how homonyms and homophones can be used to create complicated linguistic constructs. It has been discussed in literature since 1972 when the sentence was used by William J. Rapaport, an associate professor at the University at Buffalo.[1] It was posted to Linguist List by Rapaport in 1992.[2] It was also featured in Steven Pinker’s 1994 book The Language Instinct as an example of a sentence that is “seemingly nonsensical” but grammatical. Pinker names his student Annie Senghas as the inventor of the sentence.[3]

The sentence’s meaning becomes clearer when it’s understood that it uses the city of Buffalo, New York and the somewhat-uncommon verb “to buffalo” (meaning “to bully or intimidate”), and when the punctuation and grammar is expanded so that the sentence reads as follows: “Buffalo buffalo that Buffalo buffalo buffalo, buffalo Buffalo buffalo.” The meaning becomes even clearer when synonyms are used: “Buffalo bison that other Buffalo bison bully, themselves bully Buffalo bison.”

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