Robin’s pictures – Redux

This is a post I wrote back in 2013 after Robin shared more than 100 old pictures with me in 2011. It was about what I called then the A-Team.

The A-Team

Start reading…

There were so many pictures Robin scanned to look at that some were left to be identified later.

This one I think is directly related to my distant relatives.

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cousin Mary Malloy

We have to assume that Sylvia Elizabeth Bleau, Agnes Alexandre’s daughter, wrote the caption if we compare both handwriting.

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I am no expert, but it seems that way.

handwriting

Mary Malloy or Molloy would be Bertha Molloy the daughter of Philomène Alexandre and Thomas Molloy. Philomène is related to this family. These are her parents with her sisters Myra, Agnes and Helen.

the Alexandre Family

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre’s family

Mary was born 23 April 1893 in Adams, Berkshire, Massachusetts.

Here’s another picture also scanned by Robin.

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Agnes Maloy… Same handwriting. Different persons?

Agnes Maloy

Not that important unless you are related to her.

Thomas Molloy and Philomène Alexandre had these children:

James Thomas Molloy 1887 –
Jean-Baptiste Molloy 1890 –
Agnes Marie Rose Molloy 1892 – 1894
Bertha Molloy 1893 –
Eva Molloy 1895 – 1896
Albert Molloy 1897 – 1897

The only possible Mary Malloy or Agnes Maloy is  Bertha Molloy born in 1893.

As for Philomène she died in 1906.

information on Philomene Malloy

Philomene was the sister of Agnes Alexandre who was Sylvia Elizabeth’s mother.

Agnes Alexandre

Agnes Alexandre

So this makes sense. Agnes was Mary Malloy’s aunt and Sylvia was her cousin.

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I never could find much more on Thomas Molloy. Sometimes you hit a dead end, but sometimes someone write a comment and the floodgates open.

Now there was one more picture without a caption.

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?

 

How I met your ancestors? – Episode Four: Sometimes in 2009

I have left you with this last Monday…

Sometimes getting too excited about your ancestors is not such a good thing...

original picture of the Lagasse family

I really tried to control myself back in 2009 when I saw that picture.

I really did. 

The picture above was a kind of a Rosetta stone and a link to my past.

“Pepere” was Dennis Lagassey III who was my grandfather’s brother. Before I got that picture Dennis Lagasse III was just a name in a family tree like his brother Antoine was. That was enough to get me all excited with this first encounter with distant relatives.

Aunt Ida and Levi did not ring a bell though.

That was way back in 2009 when I lost contact with Germaine’s daughter and I never knew what went wrong.

Germaine Lagasse

Germaine Lagasse, daughter of Victor Philippe Lagasse and Alice D. Myers

In 2011 Levi’s grandson found me on the Internet, and I tried to control my reborn excitement. That was my second encounter with close relatives and I had learned a hard lesson.

Dennis sent me these right away… and he seemed as excited as I was with his ancestors.

 

My reaction was, shall we say, somewhat expected…

The French Connection – Part 5 – Champlain in Quebec 1608

Pierre Lagacé:

Part five from Rosh’s time travel…

Originally posted on Coming out of Hiding:

1608 – Samuel Champlain, explorer and first governor of New France, founds Quebec

From Wikipedia:

In the spring of 1608, Dugua wanted Champlain to start a new French colony on the shores of the St. Lawrence. Dugua equipped, at his own expense, a fleet of three ships with workers, that left the French port of Honfleur. The main ship, called the Don-de-Dieu (the Gift of God), was commanded by Champlain. Another ship, the Lévrier (the Hunt Dog), was commanded by his friend Du Pont. The small group of male settlers arrived at Tadoussac on the lower St. Lawrence in June. Because of the dangerous strength of the Saguenay River ending there, they left the ships and continued up the “Big River” in small boats bringing the men and the materials.[29]

Commemorative Plaque for Samuel Champlain in Honfleur, France

Commemorative Plaque for Samuel Champlain in Honfleur, France

On July 3, 1608, Champlain landed at the…

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Joseph Mignier dit Lagacé’s parents – Redux

Written exacty three years ago!

That was before I met virtually Dennis Lagasse the Fourth from Connecticut, and more than 100 precious old pictures his father Lionel had kept.

Boy was I excited!

 

Just a glimpse…

Time flies doesn’t it?

Last day of July.

Is time spent looking for our ancestors a waste of time…?

Of course it’s not.

Brian LeGacy told me he could not get to sleeep after I gave him a helping hand and he started digging for himself.

Is it worth losing sleep over our ancestors…?

Of course it’s worth.

Some psychologists say that we can find strength when we discover our roots.

I am no psychologist but I think we might have something there.

Pierre Lagacé and his brother Stanislas Lagacé (Dennis Lagasse) on a park bench probably in Connecticut probably around 1905

You see back in 2007 when I started getting interested in genealogy I did not know Stanislas Lagacé had ever existed. Of course I knew I had a great-grandfather but I knew nothing of my grandfather’s parents. Four years later, I am helping people find their roots.

Joseph Mignier dit Lagacé was the son of Michel Mignier dit Lagacé. You will find some information on the Internet and some also on Ancestry.

But beware!

Some information that are suggested might be erronous down the road. I just found out on Ancestry that some people have “discovered” André Mignier dit La Gâchette grandparents!

Wow that is quite a big surprise…!

WRONG!

I don’t mind some little errors on dates, but this couple got married in 1802! André Mignier came in New France in 1665 with the Carignan Salières  regiment.

Oups…

I won’t lose any sleep over this, but I find it a little annoying when some people put such wrong information about their ancestors or other people’s ancestors….

This reminds me of a distant 3rd cousin of mine who had my mother’s birthdate wrong on his family tree. I told him politely. He never changed it!

Go figure…

Finally, the final link to Brian’s roots…

Now Brian can get some sleep.

Now it’s Bonnie’s turn to get all excited.

The Story Behind the Picture

Pierre Lagacé:

Final part

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

I played a little trick on you didn’t I.

I posted this Saturday morning instead of Monday.

I don’t have many readers, but I don’t really mind.

Someday someone will read this article and say…

That guy is crazy… but I won’t mind.

So what is that story behind the picture of Lucille Lestage Robin scanned from little Mary’s precious collection of old family pictures?

Sweet sixteen

Quite simple… 

It is all about the reliability of our of sources.

In Philomene Lagasse’s obituary written in 1920, this is what people could read in the Bristol Press…

BRISTOL PRESS 13 March 1920
Mrs. Libbie Alexander widow of the late John Alexander died at the home of her son David Alexander 149 Park St. last evening as a result of complications due to old age.
She had been an invalid for several years.
Mrs. Alexander was born in Quebec, Canada 79 years…

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Santa comes earlier this year…

Pierre Lagacé:

Part trois…

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

Santa comes earlier this year Dennis…
Yep… Sure looks that way Peter…

Each year I play Santa… on this blog about genealogy.

Click here for Chrismas 2009 and here for Christmas 2010. This year is not different.

Let’s say it’s a tradition of mine.

I like this little animated gif image of Santa… with his trusted mule.

Like my grandfather Leo Lagacé, I have a great sense of humour or humor if you live in the States like my grandfather did from 1889 through 1907. My grandfather’s parents moved to the U.S. in 1889, Bristol, Connecticut to be more precise, and Leo came back to Quebec the year his mother died.

Leo died on January 1st 1964.

I had just turned sweet 15.

Back in 2007, 100 years later after Leo came back from the U.S., I started being interested about my ancestors in general and about my grandfather. I…

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I knew some of you would come back…

Pierre Lagacé:

Just in case you did not read the three-part sequel…

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

Still interested about Lucille Lestage…?

She has deep French-Canadian roots.

French-Canadians are proud of their roots, and it shows…

This blog is one living proof.

This young sixteen year-old teenager was the niece of Agnes Alexandre and David Nathanael Bleau. 

If you are related to the Bleaus and the Alexandres who once lived in New England in the turn of the 20th century, then you probably have found your ancestors.

Lucille Lestage was born in 1909.

Precisely on September 1st if the caption written in the back of this photo is correct.

Why would it be wrong?

Lucille was the daugther of Flavie Alexandre and Charles Lestage.

That’s not written in the back.

Flavie Alexandre was the daughter of Philomene Lagasse, my great-grandfather’s sister.

That’s not written in the back either.

Want to learn the rest of this story?

You will have to come back tomorrow.

Am I having fun…

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