Should I Go On…? Was I dead serious?

I wrote this in December 2009

I wonder if I should go on writing my English blog about genealogy.

I will think about it and get back to you soon.

It was mainly a spin-off of my blog on wartime veterans and keeping their memories alive.

I also wanted to give Lagacé descendants living in the U.S. a chance to link up with their past.

Maybe I will get a message from a descendant wanting to know more… and since I know a lot…

Montreal circa 1954

See you around…

Post 829

How to find your way on this blog?

Good luck!

You need all the help you can get to find your way around.

How Jon T. Lagasse can find his way is by looking at my private tree on Ancestry.

Even looking in there is quite mind-boggling.

What would be more mind-boggling is if I had only written in French about Jon’s ancestors on the French version of this blog Jon would have never found his ancestors.

Never in a million years…

Jon’s mother had posted a message on a genealogy forum in 2000, and then wrote a comment on this blog in December 2009. She never followed up on her comment though.

Tough luck…

I guess the time is right for Jon to get reunited with his ancestors don’t you think?

Linking with the past using Facebook?

I got this comment earlier this week…

Pierre, I was wondering if you might happen to have a Facebook account? If you do feel free to send me a friend request by searching…

It was left on this post I had written in 2009.

ORIGINAL POST

Merry Christmas to all the Lagacés no matter how you write your last name.

This might be my final chapter on the Lagacé family but I would not bet on it…

Ambroise or Ambrose was a descendant of Pierre Lagacé and Marcelline David.

I found a lot of information about Ambroise last year well before I found information on my ancestors.

This is what I found on him on the Internet…

Ambroise Lagacé was born August 11, 1872 in New Bedford, Massachusetts. He died on September 8, 1956, in Coventry, Kent, Rhode Island.

He married Flora Roussin. Flora was born on January 14, 1884, in Hawarstraw, New York. She died on April 23, 1945, in Coventry, Kent, Rhode Island.

In the 1900 census Ambrose or Ambroise was living in Bristol borough, Hartford, Connecticut.

In the 1920 census he was living in Greenwood Village, in Kent, Rhode Island. He was a machinist making screws.

Ambrose and Flora had these children:

Elmore born in or around 1900

Elsie Marcelline born in or around 1901

Roy Delphis born in or around 1909

Earl Henry born in or around 1910

Esther Georgianna born in or around 1912

Ambrose Peter born in or around 1915

Click on the image for  a larger view

If you are related to Ambroise Lagacé write a comment…

I have a strange feeling I will be back tomorrow…

END OF THE ORIGINAL POST

 

Are You Tammy Middleton…? Update

This was written in December 2009.

ORIGINAL POST

Still searching, I went on the Ancestry’s forum…

Hi,

My name is Tammy Middleton and one day while my children and I were searching for different things on the net, we found this location and hoped that maybe you could help my children solve their mystery of who they are.

Not much is known from their side of the Lagasse family as most are dead or they no longer live in our state of Virginia and their father left us with no form of contact or link to the Lagasse past.

All I know is that the Lagasses from their side came from Rhode Island. My childrens father’s name is Thomas Earl Lagasse, Jr. and his father was of course Thomas, Sr. and his father was Roy Lagasse.

Roy had another son named David Lagasse, one brother named Earl Lagasse who was living in the Florida area, and one sister named Ester.

If this links with your family or Emeril’s please contact us as my children would dearly love to know about their past and if course if they are related to Emeril.

We love his show and somehow it makes my children feel special as if their name could really mean something instead of just a name in the dark with no past and no future to past on to their children.

Thank you for your time.

Tammy Middleton


I sent Tammy an e-mail but it bounced back…

I can understand why because she posted her message in 2001.

The chances are quite slim that Tammy is right now reading my blog so is Emeril Lagasse…

But who is this Emeril Lagasse anyway?

I have never heard of him…

END OF THE ORIGINAL POST

Guess what? Tammy’s son just invited me as a friend on Facebook!

Malmaison

This is where some of my ancestors lived around 1880.

01_PLAN-CONTEXTUEL-revise

The Desrivières family lived in the manor.

malmaison-musc3a9e-mccord

A whole community revolved around them.

But you already know that don’t you.

Alexandre David, J. P., grocer (my great-great-grandfather)
Alexandre J. Bte., laborer (his son who married Philomène Lagacé, my great-grand-aunt.

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre I family

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre with his wife Philomène Lagacé and three daughters: Helen, Myra and Agnes

Baker William, jun., sectionman C.V.R.
Baker William, sen., pensioner
Best E., farm laborer
Bordeau F. X., hay presser (in fact his name was Bourdeau)
Bordeau George, hay presser
Central Vermont Railway, Joshua M. Ferris, station agent
Cote Charles, farmer
Cote Pierre, laborer
Cote T., farmer
Crothers James, J.P., postmaster, sawmill owner and mayor of Notre Dame des Anges
Des Rivieres F. G., J.P.
Ewing George, hay presser
Ewing John, hay and grain dealer
Ferris George, farm laborer
Ferris Joshua M., station agent Central Vermont Railway, agent Montreal Telegraph Co., and United States and Canada Express Co.
Fraser William, farmer
Gall Archibald, gardener
Hanigan John, saw and grist mill and lumber dealer
Hanigan John William, telegraph operator
HANIGAN WILLIAM, dealer in groceries and provisions of all descriptions, including all articles in these lines required for household use, of the best quality, and at prices as low as it is possible to sell them, also cattle dealer, opp Central Vermont Railway depot
Jourdanais Joseph, laborer
Lamair Jules, sectionman C.V.R.
Laparche Charles, blacksmith and horseshoer
Lavoie A., laborer
Leblanc David, sectionman C.V.R.
Leblanc Joseph, farmer
Leblanc Regis, farmer
Maloy Patrick, section foreman C.V.R.
Maloy Thomas, sectionman C.V.R.
Menard Charles, farm laborer
Miller Charles, farm laborer
Miller George, farmer
Miller Luke, farmer
Montreal Telegraph Co., Joshua M. Ferris, agent
Plante Arthur, miller
Plante F. X., miller
Plantier Charles, laborer
Roy Pierre, grocer
Simard J. Bte., school teacher, secretary-treasurer parish of Notre Dame des Anges
Spear Henry, farmer
Therien Jos., jun., sectionman C.V.R.
Therien Joseph, sen., grocer
United States and Canada Express Co., Joshua M. Ferris, agent
Varieur Toussaint, laborer

 

There was a train station in Malmaison. It was also called Desrivières.

1879CentralVermontRailwayCloseUp

But you already know that don’t you.

gare de malmaison

What you don’t know is how Patricia Malloy guided me to Malmaison unless you have been reading this blog carefully since July.

Our Ancestors – Pulling together – Update

1879CentralVermontRailway

This map of Central VT Rail Road shows connectivity with Montreal, and southern New England.

Below: A close-up of the map, showing stops near Franklin: Sheldon, East Berkshire and Swanton. Source: Central VT Railroad, 1879, source: Wikipedia.com

1879CentralVermontRailwayCloseUp

 

Pulling together. That’s what people are doing since 2009.

 

Julien Wilfred Lagasse original

Patricia is another one who is pulling together.

I was wondering if this Thomas Maloy, next to Patrick, could be your Thomas Maloy.

Yes Patricia, Patrick Maloy and Thomas Maloy are related to you, and they lived in Malmaison. But they were not the only ones who lived there.

MALMAISON – (DES RIVIERES STATION)
Malmaison post office is about half a mile from the Des Rivières Station of the Central Vermont Railway. It is pleasantly situated on the shores of the Pike River, parish of Notre Dame des Anges, township of Stanbridge. Population, including Des Rivières Station, about 175.

People in red are somewhat related to me…

Alexandre David, J. P., grocer (my great-great-grandfather)
Alexandre J. Bte., laborer (his son who married Philomène Lagacé, my great-grand-aunt.

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre I family

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre with his wife Philomène Lagacé and three daughters: Helen, Myra and Agnes

Baker William, jun., sectionman C.V.R.
Baker William, sen., pensioner
Best E., farm laborer
Bordeau F. X., hay presser (in fact his name was Bourdeau)
Bordeau George, hay presser
Central Vermont Railway, Joshua M. Ferris, station agent
Cote Charles, farmer
Cote Pierre, laborer
Cote T., farmer
Crothers James, J.P., postmaster, sawmill owner and mayor of Notre Dame des Anges
Des Rivieres F. G., J.P.
Ewing George, hay presser
Ewing John, hay and grain dealer
Ferris George, farm laborer
Ferris Joshua M., station agent Central Vermont Railway, agent Montreal Telegraph Co., and United States and Canada Express Co.
Fraser William, farmer
Gall Archibald, gardener
Hanigan John, saw and grist mill and lumber dealer
Hanigan John William, telegraph operator
HANIGAN WILLIAM, dealer in groceries and provisions of all descriptions, including all articles in these lines required for household use, of the best quality, and at prices as low as it is possible to sell them, also cattle dealer, opp Central Vermont Railway depot
Jourdanais Joseph, laborer
Lamair Jules, sectionman C.V.R.
Laparche Charles, blacksmith and horseshoer
Lavoie A., laborer
Leblanc David, sectionman C.V.R.
Leblanc Joseph, farmer
Leblanc Regis, farmer
Maloy Patrick, section foreman C.V.R.
Maloy Thomas, sectionman C.V.R.
Menard Charles, farm laborer
Miller Charles, farm laborer
Miller George, farmer
Miller Luke, farmer
Montreal Telegraph Co., Joshua M. Ferris, agent
Plante Arthur, miller
Plante F. X., miller
Plantier Charles, laborer
Roy Pierre, grocer
Simard J. Bte., school teacher, secretary-treasurer parish of Notre Dame des Anges
Spear Henry, farmer
Therien Jos., jun., sectionman C.V.R.
Therien Joseph, sen., grocer
United States and Canada Express Co., Joshua M. Ferris, agent
Varieur Toussaint, laborer

 

Footnote

J.P. Justice of the Peace

Morin & Lareau Family History

All you wanted to know about your Morin ancestor but were afraid to ask…

Click here to read this blog.

Sunday, September 2, 2007

History Lesson

France has been home to many ethnic groups, including Celts, Germans, Romans and Greeks.Julius Caesar brought Roman culture and the Latin language to Gaul [which covered most of western Europe] when he conquered it in 59 BC. In the 3rd and 4th centuries, a Germanic tribe [the Franks] captured some of the region. It later became part of Charlemagne’s Carolingian Empire. The country of France was a monarchy from then until the French Revolution in 1789, after which Napoleon became premier consul of the new French Republic. He crowned himself emporer of France in 1804 and reigned until 1815, when the monarchy was restored under Louis XVIII. Today, France has a bicameral legislature, a president and prime minister.During the 17th and 19th centuries, France was a religious battleground torn apart by warring elements of the predominantly Catholic population and its much smaller Protestant flock. Although laws called for tolerance, Protestant emigration siphoned off talented craftsmen. Though such turbulent episodes spurred some immigration to America, the French didn’t come en masse like other ethnic groups … they arrived in trickles rather than floods.In 1608, Samuel de Champlain formed North America’s first permanent French colony in Quebec. La Nouvelle France [New France] was based in Canada with a string of settlements along the Mississippi River. Protestants fleeing persecution in France were banned from New France; many went to the British Colonies. By the American Revolution, New France had an estimated population of 80,000, compared to 1.5 million in Britain’s 13 Colonies.

During the French Revolution from 1789-1799, thousands of political refugees left for the United States. Another immigration wave occured during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871, when France lost its Alsace-Lorraine region. Many in this group settled in New York New Orleans and Chicago.

Following the American Civil War [1861-1865] the United States saw an increase in French Canadian immigration, most frequently into Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine and Rhode Island. Our ancestors, Jean-Baptiste Morin and his wife Julie (Lareau) immigrated from Canada to Lee, Berkshire, MA in December 1871.

The 1930 census revealed that more than 135,000 US residents were French natives. The total French immigration from 1820 onward is about 750,000.

TIMELINE

  • 59-51 BC — Romans conquer Gaul
  • 486 — Frankish king Clovis I captures Roman territory in Gaul
  • 800 — Pope Leo III crowns Charlemagne emperor of the Romans
  • 845 — Viking invaders ransack Paris
  • 1152 — Henry IIs marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine gives England control of southwestern France
  • 1348 — The bubonic plague arrives in France
  • 1429 — Joan of Arc leads French forces to end English siege of Orleans
  • 1562 — Religious wars start between Catholics and Protestants
  • 1598 — Henry IV issues the Edict of Nantes
  • 1685 — Louis XIV revokes the Edict of Nantes
  • 1789 — The French Revolution begins with the storming of the Bastille
  • 1804 — Napoleon is crowned emporer of France
  • 1870 — France loses Alsace-Lorraine to Germany in the Franco-Prussian War
  • 1914 — Germany attacks France as WWI breaks out
  • 1944 — Allied forces march down the Champs-Elysees after the liberation of Paris