Should I Go On…? Was I dead serious?

I wrote this in December 2009

I wonder if I should go on writing my English blog about genealogy.

I will think about it and get back to you soon.

It was mainly a spin-off of my blog on wartime veterans and keeping their memories alive.

I also wanted to give Lagacé descendants living in the U.S. a chance to link up with their past.

Maybe I will get a message from a descendant wanting to know more… and since I know a lot…

Montreal circa 1954

See you around…

Linking with the past using Facebook?

I got this comment earlier this week…

Pierre, I was wondering if you might happen to have a Facebook account? If you do feel free to send me a friend request by searching…

It was left on this post I had written in 2009.

ORIGINAL POST

Merry Christmas to all the Lagacés no matter how you write your last name.

This might be my final chapter on the Lagacé family but I would not bet on it…

Ambroise or Ambrose was a descendant of Pierre Lagacé and Marcelline David.

I found a lot of information about Ambroise last year well before I found information on my ancestors.

This is what I found on him on the Internet…

Ambroise Lagacé was born August 11, 1872 in New Bedford, Massachusetts. He died on September 8, 1956, in Coventry, Kent, Rhode Island.

He married Flora Roussin. Flora was born on January 14, 1884, in Hawarstraw, New York. She died on April 23, 1945, in Coventry, Kent, Rhode Island.

In the 1900 census Ambrose or Ambroise was living in Bristol borough, Hartford, Connecticut.

In the 1920 census he was living in Greenwood Village, in Kent, Rhode Island. He was a machinist making screws.

Ambrose and Flora had these children:

Elmore born in or around 1900

Elsie Marcelline born in or around 1901

Roy Delphis born in or around 1909

Earl Henry born in or around 1910

Esther Georgianna born in or around 1912

Ambrose Peter born in or around 1915

Click on the image for  a larger view

If you are related to Ambroise Lagacé write a comment…

I have a strange feeling I will be back tomorrow…

END OF THE ORIGINAL POST

 

Are You Tammy Middleton…? Update

This was written in December 2009.

ORIGINAL POST

Still searching, I went on the Ancestry’s forum…

Hi,

My name is Tammy Middleton and one day while my children and I were searching for different things on the net, we found this location and hoped that maybe you could help my children solve their mystery of who they are.

Not much is known from their side of the Lagasse family as most are dead or they no longer live in our state of Virginia and their father left us with no form of contact or link to the Lagasse past.

All I know is that the Lagasses from their side came from Rhode Island. My childrens father’s name is Thomas Earl Lagasse, Jr. and his father was of course Thomas, Sr. and his father was Roy Lagasse.

Roy had another son named David Lagasse, one brother named Earl Lagasse who was living in the Florida area, and one sister named Ester.

If this links with your family or Emeril’s please contact us as my children would dearly love to know about their past and if course if they are related to Emeril.

We love his show and somehow it makes my children feel special as if their name could really mean something instead of just a name in the dark with no past and no future to past on to their children.

Thank you for your time.

Tammy Middleton


I sent Tammy an e-mail but it bounced back…

I can understand why because she posted her message in 2001.

The chances are quite slim that Tammy is right now reading my blog so is Emeril Lagasse…

But who is this Emeril Lagasse anyway?

I have never heard of him…

END OF THE ORIGINAL POST

Guess what? Tammy’s son just invited me as a friend on Facebook!

Dream Genealogy

Pierre Lagacé:

Very interesting…

Originally posted on ~~Voyageur Heritage~~ The French Canadian Cultural Alliance of the Great Lakes:

—by Anne Anderson

Dream Genealogy is a way of understanding the world of our ancestors. Although we are not devoted to genealogy exclusively on Voyageur Heritage, the search for our roots is a very popular part of our French Canadian and Metis cultures. In this piece Anne Anderson, a Canadian Metis and French-Canadian community leader, researcher, writer, and performer, presents a new way of envisioning our history and our ancestry — by tapping into our subconscious and collective memories to discover our ancestors through dreams.

I was doing the housework and listening to talk radio. It was many years ago, and as a genealogist, I had been wondering about one particular family line, the Desmarais from France. Many of the Desmarais not only looked like they were part First Nations, but also had peculiar “raccoon eyes.” I wanted to specifically know what part of Europe they came from and I…

View original 1,561 more words

Amanda

Pierre Lagacé:

This post Rosh gives you a pretty good idea of how curious I am and what GOD is all about.

Originally posted on Our Ancestors:

This is Amanda Ménard, the Mother of all your grandmothers or your great-grandmothers.

She is a very important person because you would not be reading this.

Odna Lagasse

When Donna sent this picture two weeks ago I first thought it was Amanda’s daughter Odna, but Donna told me that she was her great-grandmother Amanda.

I won’t argue with Donna. She should know more about her great-grandmother than I do.

But does she?

Amanda Ménard had 11 children.

arbre Amanda Ménard

I know everything about her children and some of her grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Back in 2009, I did not know anything about Amanda Ménard. She had never existed nor did her husband Dennis Lagasse III, my grandfather’s brother.

Later on, Amanda became a name on an obituary full of information on her and her children.

obituary Amanda Ménard

Just like her husband Dennis Lagasse’s obituary who died in 1922.

obit

Lots of precious information.

My grandfather died in 1964…

View original 604 more words

the French Connection – Part 9 – the Women who Came to New France

Pierre Lagacé:

Great information of who were probably your ancestors if you have French-Canadian roots. Most of people living in the U.S. have some.

Originally posted on Coming out of Hiding:

There were two groups of women who came to New France early in the development of the colonies. The first group were the fille a marier or marriageable women. They came between 1643 and 1663. The second group were the Kings Daughters or Fille du Roi. They came later and had more benefits.

THE MARRIAGEABLE WOMEN
 
 
From the Many Roads website:
 

They (the marriage women) were promised nothing but the possibility of a better life. If they survived the perils of the crossing, they lived with the daily threat of death at the hands of the Iroquois. If they survived the Iroquois, they had to deal with the hard life of subsistence farming, harsh winters spent in a log cabin that they may have helped build, epidemics of smallpox and “fever” and difficult and often dangerous childbirth.

Cap Tourant - first farm in Quebec

Cap Tourant – first farm in Quebec

Crossing the Atlantic…

View original 848 more words

Sweet dreams Patricia

This is what I wrote last week to Patricia my new found third cousin once removed. 

I was reflecting…

How do you feel being reconnected with your extended family?

I am just overwhelmed by all I have found on the Alexandre family.
I have so many pictures yet so many are of unknown people like you could see.

I am just thinking about how I would feel seeing pictures for the first time of the Lagacé family in the late 1800s and early 1900s from a complete stranger.

Pierre

Patricia is the person who had written a comment a month ago on my Ancestry tree.

She finally took a look at my family tree, and this is what she had sent me.

Pierre,

I almost cannot explain the feelings I have surrounding this discovery.  My entire life, as long as I can remember anyway, has been spent in awe of this wonderful man who came from nothing and had no one.  His attitude toward life and love was something we could all benefit from.  I have always wanted to understand how someone could put a little boy in an orphanage and never see him again. The “whys” of it continue to haunt me.When he died, I promised myself I would try to find out his story and until now had hit brick walls.  I feel grateful to you and others who continued to pursue your searches and are kind enough to share.  I am grateful for Ancestry’s DNA match. Who knew I was 47% Irish.  I suspected daddy’s father might have come from Ireland based on our family name but had not been able to prove it.  I get almost giddy with the search. There is something new to discover at every turn and even small bits of information excite me.

Feelings:  excitement, gratitude, love, wonderment, surprise, thanksgiving and so much more.

It makes me want to jump on a plane and spend time in Quebec again to walk where they did and to meet these cousins I didn’t know I had.  Coming from such a small family, connections seem more important to me than every.  Even if it is 3rd cousins.  Perhaps at 68 I am getting more conscious of time constraints. 
 
Thank you,
 
Pat

 

Sweet dreams Patricia.

You’re not alone anymore.