Are you suffering from GOD?

Post 801

We are at a crossroad my loyal readers because we will be closing a chapter on this blog.

Harry Lagasse

Harry Lagasse

Are you suffering from GOD?

Genealogical obsessive disorder?

That what I think after I have been reading a few posts from a new found blogger about genealogy.

I am definitely suffering from GOD.

No disrespect God wise.

Which makes me think about BWD.

Blog writing disorder.

comp018

Dear Pierre,
I hope you’re not tired helping people’s ancestors!

family picture of Dennis Lagassey and Amanda Menard with children

Smile!

oldmanatcomputer

Just kidding of course…

Who’s who in my zoo?

Post 799!

Rosh used that expression in a comment after I wrote this:

Don’t read too many in one day.
Don’t rush into this.
Your head will spin

She wrote back…

I know. It already is. I’ll make sense of it over time. I’ve spent years figuring out who’s who in my zoo.

Comments are most often overlooked which is a shame.

Here are a few gem comments posted lately.

From Richard Lemaire about my posts on the Myers and Chrétien Lemaire…

My ancestor Jean-Baptiste Lemaire married Marie-Madeleine Darche at St. Joseph in Chambly in 1786.

He was born in Besancon, Doubs, Franche Comté circa 1753, son of Joseph or Claude Joseph Lemaire and Jeanne Costille.  Tradition says he was with the French Troops under Rochambeau along with a brother Claude (Marie) Lemaire and uncle Laurent Costille.

Claude returned to France via Barbados. JB and uncle went on to Canada.

I am writing this as I had a researcher insists JB was Chretien’s son. I know there were two JBs in Chambly at this time.

Thanks for reading.

Richard

From Aquila about my post on Find a Grave…

I have to agree with what he wrote, Pierre. I was preparing the memorial for a family member and when I went to add it to Find a Grave discovered that someone else had already entered a memorial but with no real information. I asked if they would transfer the memorial to me and was told no, it would reduce their collection of memorials. I would rather see the control of the memorials on Find a Grave in the hands of family members rather than collectors. It was a painful and sad realization that my family member was no longer mine in death and that their memorial was a just a way of counting coup and had no other meaning for the person in control of it.

As a footnote to this 799th post…

My father was born on August 31st, 1927.

He would have been 87 today and be a great-grandfather for a fourth time.

Instead he had decided to leave this Earth completely broken by life at 69 on August 27th, 1995.

Léo Lagacé Junior Repos St-François d'Assise

August 27th, 1995. That’s the last time I saw him even if he was too ashamed to see his three loving children before he left this Earth.

Around 11 PM he turned towards me and this broken-hearted little child found inner peace.

leo lagace 1931

Sweet dreams Patricia

This is what I wrote last week to Patricia my new found third cousin once removed. 

I was reflecting…

How do you feel being reconnected with your extended family?

I am just overwhelmed by all I have found on the Alexandre family.
I have so many pictures yet so many are of unknown people like you could see.

I am just thinking about how I would feel seeing pictures for the first time of the Lagacé family in the late 1800s and early 1900s from a complete stranger.

Pierre

Patricia is the person who had written a comment a month ago on my Ancestry tree.

She finally took a look at my family tree, and this is what she had sent me.

Pierre,

I almost cannot explain the feelings I have surrounding this discovery.  My entire life, as long as I can remember anyway, has been spent in awe of this wonderful man who came from nothing and had no one.  His attitude toward life and love was something we could all benefit from.  I have always wanted to understand how someone could put a little boy in an orphanage and never see him again. The “whys” of it continue to haunt me.When he died, I promised myself I would try to find out his story and until now had hit brick walls.  I feel grateful to you and others who continued to pursue your searches and are kind enough to share.  I am grateful for Ancestry’s DNA match. Who knew I was 47% Irish.  I suspected daddy’s father might have come from Ireland based on our family name but had not been able to prove it.  I get almost giddy with the search. There is something new to discover at every turn and even small bits of information excite me.

Feelings:  excitement, gratitude, love, wonderment, surprise, thanksgiving and so much more.

It makes me want to jump on a plane and spend time in Quebec again to walk where they did and to meet these cousins I didn’t know I had.  Coming from such a small family, connections seem more important to me than every.  Even if it is 3rd cousins.  Perhaps at 68 I am getting more conscious of time constraints. 
 
Thank you,
 
Pat

 

Sweet dreams Patricia.

You’re not alone anymore.

Have you ever felt being abandoned by someone?

Note

This was to be posted tomorrow, but Patricia wrote me she can’t wait to read it…

Full speed ahead!

 

This is how I came about to write this blog and the reason I can’t stop writing for fear of abandoning you.

I have always felt that I was abandoned by my father, and I wanted to know why.

Patricia had the answer all along.

I started my journey back in July 2007 without knowing I was searching my ancestors for this reason, and I started writing about it in September 2009. I never wrote that much about my father on this blog as I wanted not to be disrespectful. That’s the lesson my father taught me in life even if life had taught him otherwise.

Patricia told me she had a wonderful father.

Francis Joseph Malloy

Francis Joseph Malloy
1909-1975

I wondered how Patricia felt with all the information I have been feeding her. I could feel it when she shared her feelings in this message. She told me I could post it.

Pierre,

I almost cannot explain the feelings I have surrounding this discovery.  My entire life, as long as I can remember anyway, has been spent in awe of this wonderful man who came from nothing and had no one.  His attitude toward life and love was something we could all benefit from.  I have always wanted to understand how someone could put a little boy in an orphanage and never see him again. The “whys” of it continue to haunt me.When he died, I promised myself I would try to find out his story and until now had hit brick walls.  I feel grateful to you and others who continued to pursue your searches and are kind enough to share.  I am grateful for Ancestry’s DNA match. Who knew I was 47% Irish.  I suspected daddy’s father might have come from Ireland based on our family name but had not been able to prove it.  I get almost giddy with the search. There is something new to discover at every turn and even small bits of information excite me.

Feelings:  excitement, gratitude, love, wonderment, surprise, thanksgiving and so much more.

It makes me want to jump on a plane and spend time in Quebec again to walk where they did and to meet these cousins I didn’t know I had.  Coming from such a small family, connections seem more important to me than ever.  Even if it is 3rd cousins.  Perhaps at 68 I am getting more conscious of time constraints. 
 
Thank you,
 
Pat

Footnote

My father died on August 27, 1995.

So you want to be famous don’t you?

Then you just have to write me and I will make you famous on my blog just like I did with Dennis Lagasse.

Dennis Lagasse II

Dennis Lagasse aka Stanislas Lagacé II

Denis Lagasser was just an old man in the 1920 U.S census. 77, a carpenter… a jober. He was living on Lake Street on the corner of Dewey.

His son Dennis Lagassey was living next door.

Close-knit family!

1920 Denis Lagasser

You know all about Dennis Lagasse II and his son Dennis Lagasse III don’t you?

East Bristol 1916

Denis Lagasser (Dennis Lagasse II) was the brother of Philomène Lagasse.

Philomène Lagacé

1913 Philomene Lagasse

Philomène is also the old lady sitting with her two daughters Agnes and Mary. The young lady is Sylvia Bleau, daughter of Agnes Alexandre and David Bleau. The old lady was probably a widow when this picture was taken since her husband had died in 1914. He would be on pictures taken from that time frame.

Since I have none then…

So the caption about 1913 could be wrong. I have no idea. Dates are important but not that much unless you have them. People are.

I go crazy about people and old pictures.

This is why I got all excited when Patricia wrote last month and then later got all excited about what she had found on her new found extended family.

This is also why all this excitement lead me to write post 785.

I will see you next Monday.

About this picture

Post 781

Philomène Lagacé and her daughters

This picture might never have seen the light of day if not for the Internet. My distant cousin Joe had it in his collection of old pictures. Joe had a lot of old pictures and most were unknown people to him like these women you see here.

That was back in 2010.

Four years later Patricia can see her great-great-grandmother Philomene Lagasse in the middle.

Post 781, that’s a lot isn’t?

I just hope you don’t think I’m a kook looking for these women’s descendants…

Patricia, I think your great-grandmother Philomene Alexandre is at 2 o’clock.