My Holiest Moments

Pierre Lagacé:

You probably went through all this and never talked about it…

Originally posted on The Chatter Blog:

I’m coming clean.

The guilt of a couple of things just needs to be shed.   This may be easier said than done.  After all I do have the curse of being Irish Catholic Middle Child Oldest Daughter Guilt Syndrome.

I know that religion is very important.  I happen to love and admire the beautiful traditions of religion.  Not just mine, but many.  As an adult I can look at many different traditions and appreciate the significance, the meaning, the respect shown towards God through traditions and ceremony.

However.

I did not always quite get it.

I’m not really claiming to get all of  it now.

But I do get that I did some things that I probably ought to fess up about.

Some are pretty innocent.  Baptism?  I don’t remember it at all.  I am pretty sure that I don’t have to.   As I got older there were…

View original 1,053 more words

Blogging makes you lose weight!

students

This is a group picture of students I had back in 1991.

I was quite an impressive teacher with all that weight.

Underneath laid someone gentile as Koji commented yesterday.

You read the comments don’t you?

Pierre! OMG! Is that you with your students??? I didn’t know you were a teacher.

I’m sure they learned of sacrifices and bravery! And what did I do to deserve this?!?!

You are much too gentile, Monsieur…

Merci beaucoup! And you sure do know me!

That’s the fun part of this blog.

There is an anecdote to this picture posted on Facebook last week.

I got notified I was on a picture…

OMG!

Moi!

I read all of the comments on Facebook and I kept a low profile. Comments made were nice and not derogatory.

Then I dropped a few comments about my weight and my sense of humor (humour if you are English speaking).

OMG!

No more commenting…

I believe some students never expected this, just like Koji receiving his award.

Teacher's Pet Awards

Footnote

Second row on the right, the girl next to the boy with the Montreal Canadiens jersey…

students

I met her yesterday. She was with her kids and I was with my grandson in the same municipal park. She did not recognize me.

I told her…

You’re one of my students.

She looked at me… and I told her my name. She told her’s.

Then she remembered and said…

They don’t make teachers like you anymore.

OMG! Moi!

Moi, moi, moi…

This is my final Teacher’s Pet Awards.

I could do more but you have to know when to stop in life. I know I had a hard time stopping writing on this blog.

Having a classroom full of students raising their hands to give the answer to a question can be heartbreaking to a teacher who never wanted that some of his students would think he had some teacher’s pets.

students

23 years ago…

 

Teacher's Pet

Moi, moi, moi…

Who will be the 4th Teacher’s Pet Awards given to?

Who's Who

He writes about different subjects… from recipes to WWII veterans he met in his life.

He drives a Mustang and he likes P-47 Thunderbolt.

Can you guess who’s the 4th Teacher’s Pet Awards?

This is a link to recipes he wrote about.

This is a link to one WWII veteran he met and wrote about.

This is a link to Koji’s photos on Flickr. You should find his Mustang there.

This is a link to a P-47 Thunderbolt I wrote about?

Koji is an American of Japanese descent.

He wrote about his father, and his father’s brother.

Stories that will break your heart.

Stories he wrote with all this heart.

About

Families are the result of decades of relationships, twists of fate and world events.  It is unbelievable how one decision can ultimately determine how many descendants will be brought into this world…or what happens to them.

Twists of fate and world events can put siblings on opposite sides of a fence.  In my case, my uncle donned on the uniform of the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II and died on Leyte. My father, although a US citizen like my uncle who was killed, was imprisoned in stateside “camps” during WWII by President Franklin D. Roosevelt – just one among over 110,000 Americans of Japanese descent. Dad then enlisted for the legendary 8th US Army’s Military Intelligence Service after being released from camp.  Two of my uncles also served in the US 8th Army during hostilities.

I hope you will find the stories and family photos intertwined with World War II to be fascinating.

Some home cooking, too!

Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you will click on the links above and tell Koji you like what you see.

To you Sir my friend, it’s a honor to bestow this heartfelt award…

Teacher's Pet Awards

To Koji san

I want to be famous…

Sorry to be reflecting again on this Father’s Day.

This is what motivates people both in life and in death.

To be recognized in life by their peers.

Moi, moi, moi…

Perfectly normal to do so unless you use mean ways to do it.

It must have happen in your lifetime. Like when you were two years-old. I never knew about the “terrible two” although I turned 65 in December and that I am now a proud grandfather of two wonderful grandchildren with two more in the very near future.

Child development stages describe theoretical milestones of child development, some of which asserted as nativist theories.

This article is based on a general model based on the most widely accepted developmental stages. However, it is important to understand that there is wide variation in terms of what is considered “normal,” driven by a wide variety of genetic, cognitive, physical, family, cultural, nutritional, educational, and environmental factors. Many children will reach some or most of these milestones at different times from the norm. It is important to keep in mind that even a tiny baby is a person. Holistic development sees the child in the round, as a whole person – physically, emotionally, intellectually, socially, morally, culturally and spiritually. Learning about child development involves studying patterns of growth and development, from which guidelines for ‘normal’ development are drawn up. Developmental norms are sometimes called milestones- they describe the recognised pattern of development that children are expected to follow. Each child will develop in a unique way; however, using norms helps in understanding these general patterns of development while recognising the wide variation between individuals. This page talks mostly about the development of the English language during the language sections. (Wikipedia)

Read more…

We always learn new things in life whether we are two or sixty-five. I am just glad I have learned about the terrible two.

So have I been writing that much on this blog to be famous? A famous amateur genealogist? A famous blogger? A famous grandfather? I am still pondering about it.

I know you should also.

So what about having a Grandfather’s Day some of these days?

Is your ancestor famous?

Rosh has to be proud of her famous ancestor Nicolas Marsolet.

I know I would be if I was Rosh since I am myself a proud descendant of Jean Nicolet.

Jean_Nicolet

Bonjour!

Nicolas Marsolet confronted Champlain who wanted to…

Well you have read about it haven’t you?

Champlain has been immortalized in so many ways here in Quebec. A lake, a town, a county…

He even has his own bridge which is falling apart.

This being said, read this about another famous person,  but only after breakfast.

Columbus Day will never be the same.

Time for a nice warm bowl of oatmeal!

Footnote

I found this on the Internet. I am just sharing it…for the moment that is.

 

Descendants of Nicolas Marsolet and Marguerite De Planes

Generation No. 1

1.  NICOLAS1 MARSOLET was born in Rouen, Normandy, France, and died in France.  He married MARGUERITE DE PLANES.  She was born in France, and died in France.

Child of NICOLAS MARSOLET and MARGUERITE DE PLANES is:
2.    i.    NICOLAS2 MARSOLET, b. 1601, St. Agnan de Rouen, France; d. May 15, 1677, Quebec QC.

Generation No. 2

2.  NICOLAS2 MARSOLET (NICOLAS1) was born 1601 in St. Agnan de Rouen, France, and died May 15, 1677 in Quebec QC.  He married MARIE LA BARBIDE 1637 in Rouen , Normandy, France, daughter of HENRI LA BARBIDE and MARIE LE VILLAIN.  She was born 1619 in Rouen, Normandy, France, and died February 21, 1688 in Quebec, QC.

Notes for NICOLAS MARSOLET:
When Samuel de Champlain set out on his second colonization voyage from France to the New World in 1613 he carried with him on this adventure a young boy named Nicolas Marsolet who was twelve years of age.

A common practice during the very early days in New France was to assign a boy to live with the Indian tribes to learn the language and customs of the natives.  He would then serve as a guide and interpreter for the French to assist in the fur trade.  Nicolas Marsolet filled this role and became proficient in the Algonquin and Montaigne (a member of the Innu people living in the barrens between Hudson’s Bay and the Labrador coast)  languages.

In 1628 the Kirke brothers, three young Englishmen in search of adventure and somewhat curious about what the French were doing in America, came to anchor in Tadoussac Bay.  They found French supply ships in the bay and captured several of them.  They were so loaded with booty and prisoners that they had to forego their trip to Quebec so they sailed back to England with their prizes.  As no supply ships arrived, Champlain and his settlers at Quebec endured severe hardships that winter.

The following year,1629, the Kirke brothers returned.  One stayed at Tadoussac and the other two proceeded up river to Quebec with a nicely worded letter to Champlain.  The letter stated that they intended to have Quebec and they would much prefer not to put him to too much inconvenience, would he be good enough to hand over the fort without fighting and they would be treated well.  Champlain took the more discreet course and surrendered the city.   The first conquest of Quebec was a simple matter,

Nicolas surrendered to the Kirke brothers.  He later reported to French authorities that he was forced to stay with the English to serve as interpreter so that more furs could be obtained from the Indians.  Champlain and about two thirds of the colonists returned to France.  The English sailed back to Tadoussac loaded with furs and booty.  When all the ships were mustered they proceeded on the  return journey to England taking Nicolas with them. The following year  Quebec was handed back to the French after a treaty was signed between France and England.

Nicolas eventually made his way from England to his home in France then back to the new world to continue his involvement in the fur trade.  Over time he acquired several large tracks of land (seigneuries).  He went  to France where he met and married Marie La Barbide in 1637.  Nicolas was 36 years at the time and his new bride was 18.  On returning to New France He went to live in his seigneury near Quebec City, known as Marsolet Prairie.  They raised a large family including a daughter Louise who is the forth great grandmother of Pierre McCraw.

Nicolas died in Quebec City on May 15, 1677  Following his death Marie La Barbide married  Denis Lemaitre, a tailor by occupation, on May 8, 1681 in Quebec City.  Maire Died on February 21, 1688.

Children of NICOLAS MARSOLET and MARIE LA BARBIDE are:
3.    i.    LOUISE3 MARSOLET, b. May 17, 1640, Quebec, QC.
ii.    MARIE MARSOLET, m. D’AMOUR.
iii.    GENEVIEVE MARSOLET, m. MICHEL GUYON.
iv.    MADELAINE MARSOLET, m. FRANCOIS GUYON.
v.    JEAN MARSOLET, m. MAGUERITE COUTURE, February 09, 1680.

Generation No. 3

3.  LOUISE3 MARSOLET (NICOLAS2, NICOLAS1) was born May 17, 1640 in Quebec, QC.  She married JEAN LEMIRE October 20, 1653 in Quebec, QC, son of MATHURIN LEMIRE and JEANNE BOUVIER.  He was born 1626 in St. Vivier de Rouen, Normandy, France, and died October 05, 1684 in Quebec, QC.

Child of LOUISE MARSOLET and JEAN LEMIRE is:
4.    i.    JEAN4 LEMIRE.

Generation No. 4

4.  JEAN4 LEMIRE (LOUISE3 MARSOLET, NICOLAS2, NICOLAS1)  He married FRANCOISE FOUCAULT February 05, 1701 in Three Rivers, QC, daughter of JEAN FOUCAULT and ELIZABETH PROVOST.

Child of JEAN LEMIRE and FRANCOISE FOUCAULT is:
5.    i.    RENE5 LEMIRE.

Generation No. 5

5.  RENE5 LEMIRE (JEAN4, LOUISE3 MARSOLET, NICOLAS2, NICOLAS1)  He married MADELAINE GELINA January 07, 1736 in Yamachiche, QC, daughter of PIERRE GELINAS and MADELINE BOURBEAU.

Child of RENE LEMIRE and MADELAINE GELINA is:
6.    i.    MADELEINE6 LEMIRE.

Generation No. 6

6.  MADELEINE6 LEMIRE (RENE5, JEAN4, LOUISE3 MARSOLET, NICOLAS2, NICOLAS1)  She married JOSEPH LUPIEN November 04, 1758 in Contract Rigaud, QC, son of JEAN LUPIEN and MARIE FAFARD.

Child of MADELEINE LEMIRE and JOSEPH LUPIEN is:
7.    i.    ROSE7 LUPIEN.

Generation No. 7

7.  ROSE7 LUPIEN (MADELEINE6 LEMIRE, RENE5, JEAN4, LOUISE3 MARSOLET, NICOLAS2, NICOLAS1)  She married ANTOINE GILBERT October 04, 1784 in Maskinonge, QC, son of ANTOINE GILBERT and LOUISE PLANTE.

Child of ROSE LUPIEN and ANTOINE GILBERT is:
8.    i.    PELAGIE8 GILBERT, b. St. Cuthbert. QC.

Generation No. 8

8.  PELAGIE8 GILBERT (ROSE7 LUPIEN, MADELEINE6 LEMIRE, RENE5, JEAN4, LOUISE3 MARSOLET, NICOLAS2, NICOLAS1) was born in St. Cuthbert. QC.  She married ALEXANDER MCCRAW January 14, 1820 in St. Cuthbert, QC, son of DUNCAN MACRA and BARBARA FRASER.  He was born January 19, 1793 in Sorel, QC.

Notes for ALEXANDER MCCRAW:

The baptisim register of Christs Church(Anglican) at William Henry lists the following:
January 28 1793 —  Alexander, son of Duncan & Barbara McCraw born 19th ins. : Spon. Mrs O.    McLeach and his father.

Census records of 1871 for district 156, Somerset, Megantic County lists Henry (Honore) McCraw, Scot, farmer, age 38, his wife Adele and five childred, the youngest boy and girl are twins.  Also living with them is Henry’s father Alexander, age 78 and his nephew Telesphore, age 14.

The same census shows Alexander’s son Alexis George living on the adjacent farm with his family.

Children of PELAGIE GILBERT and ALEXANDER MCCRAW are:
i.    ADELAIDE9 MCCRAW, b. January 21, 1821, St. Cuthbert,  Que.
ii.    PIERRE MCCRAW, b. August 21, 1822, St. Cuthbert, QC.; d. April 17, 1864, St. Paul de Chester, QC.; m. MARGUERITE ROSE LAURENDEAU, November 25, 1845, Plessesville, QC.; b. Que.; d. August 16, 1913, St. Jean Baptiste, MB..
iii.    ALEXIS GEORGE MCCRAW, b. April 17, 1824, St. Cuthbert. Que.; m. EUPHROSINE ROUSSEAU, July 20, 1847, Plessesville, Que.; b. 1818.
iv.    JOSEPH MCCRAW, b. March 25, 1825, St. Cuthbert. Que..
v.    LOUIS CHRISTOPHE MCCRAW, b. April 01, 1826, St. Cuthbert. Que.; m. ROSE DE LIMA CAMIRE, January 22, 1850, Plessesville, Que..
vi.    JEAN MCCRAW, b. October 28, 1827, St. Cuthbert. Que..
vii.    WILLIAM MCCRAW, b. June 23, 1829, St. Cuthbert. Que..
viii.    JACQUES MCCRAW, b. March 08, 1832, St. Cuthbert, Que.; m. ESTHER BELLEAU, October 20, 1873.
ix.    HONORE MCCRAW, b. July 03, 1833, St. Cuthbert, QC.; d. Lewiston, Me., U.S.A.; m. ADELE FILION, July 15, 1862, Laurieville, Que..

Notes for HONORE MCCRAW:
After moving with his family to Lewiston Me in the 1880’s his name translated into American English became Henry McGraw and his descendants continue to use this spelling of the sir name.  In Henry’s obiturary he is reported to have 22 children. At this time we can only account for 13 children plus his nephew Telesphore William McCrea who was sent to live with his uncle Henry at the age of 8 after his father died in 1864.

x.    EDWARD MCCRAW, b. May 24, 1835, St. Cuthbert, QC.; m. SOPHIE GOULET, October 27, 1857, Plessesville, QC..
xi.    MARY LEOCADIE MCCRAW, b. St. Barthelemy, QC..
xii.    GENEVIEVE MCCRAW, b. St. Barthelemy,  Que.
xiii.    CHARLES MCCRAW, b. Plessisville, Que.

I am Canadian – the French Connection – Part 2

Pierre Lagacé:

Shows someone who is proud of her French-Canadian roots…

Originally posted on Coming out of Hiding:

A Tribute to Nicholas Marsolet  (My 8th great grandfather)  The Man in the Muddle

After Jacques Cartier the next major player for exploration of the St. Lawrence River was Samuel de Champlain. The first trading post set up in Quebec was Tadoussac. The explorers had contact with the Montagnais, Alongquin, Micmac and Malecite people. One of the first settlements to be attempted was at Port Royal in Nova Scotia, but later the focus for settlement moved to Quebec. Samuel de Champlain was the man who was instrumental in starting the settlements in Quebec. In 1608 he erected the first building in Quebec City. That was the beginning of the French colonization of New France.

Champlains voyages

Champlains voyages

champlains voyages

It is believed that Nicholas Marsolet arrived in New France sometime in 1613 on one of Champlain’s visits to New France. Nicholas, my great grandfather,  was born in Rouen, Normandy, France as were…

View original 1,216 more words

Sardonic? Who me?

Little old moi?

Sardonic?

An unknown French-Canadian who never set foot in Florida with all those Canadian snowbirds.

Sardonic?

Someone with deep roots in Deerfield, Massachusetts when two of his ancestors were captured in a French raid in 1704.

Moi, sardonic?

This almost unknown blogger who has been writing like crazy since 2008, and never received any bloggers’ awards except for being once nominated.

Sardonic?

No way!

Teacher's Pet Awards

Heartfelt…

I have no malice.

Rosh is the third recipient.

She’s the one who had nominated me and gave me this crazy idea of creating a real genuine award.

A real genuine heartfelt award to bloggers who really need to be commended for what they write like Notes and GP. It’s easy to see through them through their blogs…

They are just open books.

They have so much to give.

Take the time to visit Rosh’s blog and discover a wonderful person with her first ever post. I would have never found her without her nominating me for an award.

liebster-award

Sardonic? Moi?

Never!

I have no malice inside of little old moi.

 I wonder if I should start a blog about little old moi…?

Being famous…

Some people will do anything to be famous.

To get their 15 minutes of fame.

It’s not my cup of tea.

I don’t have to be famous to get recognition.

You don’t have to be famous also to get some here on this blog.

In fact it’s the first criteria.

This is why I created this award.

Teacher's Pet Awards

Meeting beautiful minds out there on cyberspace has been the most precious gift I have received since I started writing blogs in 2008. It was about a recollection I had: a picture of a great-grandfather.

Édouard Métayer

I hope you have enjoyed some posts of my first two bloggers I have given that award.

I have many more in store for you.

All are picked at random as I wash the dishes. My wife cooks and I wash the dishes. She uses a lot of dishes and I have a lot of recollections from which I select one.

It does not matter if I am rich and famous.

In fact I am none of those.

Just a compulsive blogger who can’t stop washing dishes and having recollections.

See you next Monday for the 3rd Teacher’s Pet Awards.