Remember Good Old Holyoke?

Ed had sent me this message along with his 31 pictures of unidentified ancestors.

After our little discussion of the Alexander family and from what little research I have done, I believe I have some old photographs that might be from their family.  When my aunt died in 1963, her mother, my grandmother, brought back to Georgia a steamer trunk containing some of my aunt’s things.  In that trunk was a group of old photographs.  They were in my grandmother’s things in 1975 when she died and they have finally come to rest with me. 

No one was ever able to tell me anything about the pictures (I never even thought to ask Uncle George).  They are of babies, children, families, and individual men and women, all dating to the late 1800s and early 1900s. 

None have any names indicating whom the pictures are of, however some do have photographer’s marks.  There are 31 photographs and 16 have Holyoke, Massachusetts labels, 2 have Quebec labels, and 1 has a label from Bristol, Connecticut.  These are all places associated with the Alexanders.  In 1920 and 1930, Jean-Baptiste and his family were living in Bristol, CT; in 1910, they were in Holyoke, MA and prior to that, they were in Quebec.   

All of Ed’s 31 pictures did not look familiar at first glance.

Even Robin had this comment…

What a challenge! Are we up to it?

All were unidentified ancestors until Frank sent me this picture of  John Archambeault.

He is Jean-Baptiste Archambeault’s and Emilia Mercier’s son. John Archambeault married Florence Boucher. He could be the same man seen in this montage I made with one of Ed’s pictures.

I had this picture identified as family 1.

Family 1

You have to start somewhere don’t you…

Anyway, this Family 1 could be John Archambault with his wife Florence Boucher and a daughter. I know they had at least four daughters… because Frank told me.

Flora Archambault (1873)

Lillie (Lillian) Archambault (1877)

Alice Archambault (4 July 1878)

Nellie (Helen) Archambault 1884

Nellie could be the daughter on the picture.

Now if we turn our attention to Family 2.

Family 2

Could this family be also related to the Archambeault family…?

How about his one then and all other 28 pictures sent by Frank that were all unidentified ancestors?

Family 3

 I have no idea.

About John Archambeault…

I believe it’s him on these two pictures.

If this is John, then this could be John with his daughter Flora born in 1873.

I know sometimes I might be hard to follow…

I am still wondering…

I am still wondering if this is Sophie Archambeault and the man beside her is her husband Frank Lagasse (1858-1937), another descendant of Stanislas Lagacé I (1816-1900) whom we still don’t  have a picture of.

I have his dead certificate though, but that’s not enough.

Frank is the brother of Stanislas Lagacé II (Dennis Lagasse II, 1842-1927) seen here on another picture Dennis IV sent me last month.

The mustache is a dead giveaway.

There is another mustache I want to show you.

I wonder if this could be Frank Lagasse’s mustache on the old man on the right.

The mustache  is seen again here.

I always thought the old man was Dennis Lagasse II. Now I am sure he is not.

The old man could be Frank Lagasse because one of his son was Bill Lagasse, and the caption with this picture says Bill Lagasse is on it.

One thing for sure, we will know for sure one of these days as well as all the names of all those people on that picture.

As a footnote to all this crazy mustache search.

I am still searching for whose mustache this is.

You know dear, one day he will find out who we are…

Unidentified Couple

This is going to be interesting.

This tintype picture was part of the lot Frank Archambeault sent me two weeks ago.

I started wondering who was this unidentified couple…

The young woman posing here seemed a bit familiar.

Sandy had sent me this picture of Sophie Archambeault in 2011.

She told me that Sophie Archambeault was married to Frank Lagasse (François-Xavier Lagacé) one of Dennis Lagasse II’s  brother. We already have a picture of Peter Lagasse and Dennis Lagasse on a park bench.

Now I am starting to wonder… if we have the same woman on both pictures since Frank told me that all the pictures he sent me were Archambeaults.

I am wondering…

I am still wondering…

Touching Lives Again and Again Take Two

Many people have helped me since 2010 to touch lives over and over again.

I had posted this tintype picture in March 2012 with this post.

Carl J. Archambeault Sr., who is Frank’s brother, found my blog before his brother did and he wrote me this e-mail.

Hello….

I just came across this blog… 

Where are you located? 

Philip Archambeault (whose obituary is listed above) is my father. I’m the baby of 11 children of Philip and Elizabeth Archambeault.

He had that tintype picture and he said it was probably taken around 1880.

It was Jean-Baptiste Archambeault aka John Shambo, aka John Shambeau…

I thought I had recognized his son William Archambeault on that picture, but Frank set me straight about his grandfather on that picture.

It was taken before William’s birth in 1873!

Furthermore that person was a she…

She had breasts!

Since then, I have gathered more information about the Archambeault family thanks to Frank.

Slowly but surely Frank and I are on the road to identify more people…

See you on Monday. 

Frank’s Tintype Pictures

Twelve pictures…

More if you count this one.

All the pictures are related to Jean-Baptiste Archambault who we see here in front of his house. This is not a tintype picture of course.

His wife Emélie Mercier is on the left. On the right is probably one of his daughter and a grandchild. I just can’t get enough of old pictures especially when I can identify who is on them.

There is always a story behind each picture even if it is reversed for unknown reasons.

This one I am sure is Mary Archambault.

Everyone related to her can enjoy this beautiful picture of a beautiful young lady. Everyone also can see her brother William who married Myra Alexandre in 1902. He is the little boy on the left on the top and middle row.

I could be wrong, but he looks a lot like William in other pictures people sent me.

So when all this search is going to stop?

Probably not in the nearest future.

Miss Mary Archambeault… I Presume…

Frank Archambeault, a distant cousin of mine, scanned and sent me two weeks ago several tintype pictures of the Archambeault family to share with you.

Frank has fond memories of his grandmother Myra Alexandre who, back in 2010, was that unidentified young woman on the right on this picture sent in 2010 by Sandy, another distant cousin. Back then they were known as Bristol late 1890s’ sisters.

Flavie  (Phoebe) Alexandre Lestage and Myra Alexandre Archambeault

There is another young woman on this tintype picture who is just begging to be identified.

She is on the left in the first row.

I presume all these young women are Archambeault sisters.

This is another picture Frank sent me. The young lady had a very familiar look.

Could she be Mary Archambeault, one of several daughters of Jean-Baptiste Archambeault and Emilia Mercier whom we see here in another tintype picture with their children?

circa 1873

Mary would be on the right side just under the young man in the last row with his hand on her shoulder.

By looking at this next picture Robin had scanned last year, I think I recognize Mary.

Mary Archambault and Arthur Ashley were Ida Ashley’s parents. Ida is the bride on this picture. Leo Combe is the groom.

Someone once told me that tintype pictures were a mirror reflection, but I don’t remember who told me that.

So this would be the real Mary Archambeault…

Whether my theory is correct or not, where do you think Arthur Ashley was on this picture taken on Ida Ashley’s wedding day?

1917

The answer is…

Arthur Ashley is probably the man in the back on the right side because the man on the left side is Victor Combe, the groom’s father. The old man in the second row on the extreme left is Jean-Baptiste Archambeault, the bride’s grandfather.

Gettysburg July 3rd, 1863, a Time to Remember the Fallen

Many soldiers died at Gettysburg.

One of them was Jude Newcity, Calista’s son. This is what I found during my search for Calista’s identity.

I thought posting this was important.

Jude’s Service Record:

Enlisted as a Private on 11 September 1862 at the age of 18.

Enlisted in Company G, 13th Infantry Regiment Vermont on 10 October 1862.

Killed Company G, 13th Infantry Regiment Vermont on 3 July 1863 at Gettysburg, PA. Burial spot unknown.

Birth: 1844

Enosburg

Franklin County

Vermont, USA

Death: July 3, 1863

Pennsylvania, USA

Sources for the above information:

- Roster of Vermont Volunteers During the War of the Rebellion 1861-66, (1892)

- History of the 13th Vermont Volunteers, (1910)

- These Honored Dead: The Union Casualties at Gettysburg, (Longstreet House, 1988)

History:

JUDE NEWCITY was born in the town of Enosburg in 1844, volunteered under President Lincoln’s call for 300,000 nine months’ men and joined Company G, 13th Vt. Vols., Infantry.

He was a mere lad and hardly ever had been away from home for a single night before enlistment. A green country boy, pure in thought, chaste in speech and modest in demeanor, correct in his habits, and diligent in the pursuit of knowledge as to his new duties as a soldier. Too young for the hardships of camp and march and the awful scenes and carnage of the battlefield. He was anxious to join the army and fight for the Union. He inherited patriotic devotion for the land that stood for liberty and freedom. He comprehended beyond his years the wicked and dastardly motives of those who sought to destroy the Union of States and establish the barbarous and inhuman institution of American slavery throughout the land.

None of the boys of company G rejoiced more, when President Lincoln sent forth his Emancipation Proclamation. He was now more anxious than ever with all his mind, strength and devotion to fight for his home and overnment. After he enquired of his officers and comrades if we should conquer General Lee’s army. Not one of the boys of Company G were more faithful, obedient and courteous than Comrade Newcity. He was a good boy, soldier, brave, conscientious and true with innocent faith and abiding confidence that all would come out for the best. He often spoke of home and the loved ones he left behind and with affectionate manifestations spoke of the prospect of reunion when the war was over. He seemed to think one great battle would end the conflict and that was near at hand. On the march to Gettysburg he frequently said we will have a mighty battle and then the war will be over. To this boy soldier I became strongly attached and sincerely hoped he might be safely returned to home and schoolmates and friends. I could not bear the thought that such should be sacrificed on the field of battle.

On the second day of the battle after the charge when we retook our cannon that General Longstreet’s men had captured cheerfully said, “We shall win the day and then for home.”

He was killed the following day, July 3rd, 1863.

Source: History of the 13th Regiment Vermont Volunteers

Burial:

Non-Cemetery Burial

Specifically: Died in battle at Gettysburg, Pa

Burial unknown.

Jude Newcity never knew his roots. Two of his ancestors were soldiers: Mathurin Villeneuve with the Carignan-Salières regiment, in 1665, who fought the Iroquois, and Jacques Aveline with the Berry regiment, in 1760, who fought the British at the Battle of Sainte-Foy.

Only a few remembered Jude Newcity who left no descendants to honor his memory.

Burial unknown!

Source

This is why I thought posting this was important.