Caroline Ménard

This is the only picture we have of Caroline…

No, it’s not the only one.

I have this one also…

These documents are precious for all the information they contain.

Being French-Canadian, it’s quite easy to read them like the baptisimal certificate of little Caroline.

Caroline was born on November 26, 1863. Zéphirin Ménard was her father and Rose Therrien was her mother.

With this information we can go back in time and find Caroline’s Ménard ancestors.

The marriage act has much more information with the names of the groom’s and the bride’s parents, and those of the witnesses.

Caroline Ménard married Jean-Baptiste Alexandre. We have a lot of pictures of Jean-Baptiste Alexandre thanks to Sandy in 2010 and Robin in 2011.

Sandy had this one… Young man 1.

With Robin’s pictures and someone who found my blog and shared what pictures he had, we have managed to identify Jean-Baptiste.

Jean-Baptiste married twice and had 18 children with his two wives. Caroline Ménard died in 1895 when she gave birth to her 8th child. Jean-Baptiste remarried.

For many of her descendants, Caroline Ménard is a complete stranger just like young man 1 was in 2010.

I know that one day, someone will send me a picture of Caroline, and I will share it with you.

Speaking of sharing, I have someone else who shared what little information he had last year.

He is Dennis Lagasse IV’s father. I never met Lionel and I will probably never meet him unless I win big at the lottery.

But I can tell you this… Lionel is a very nice person. 

Of course being an avid reader of this blog about genealogy helps…

Seriously…

Last year, around Christmas time, Lionel shared this picture.

Little did he know that the woman standing beside Dennis Lagasse III on the right is Caroline Ménard’s sister Amanda.

Lionel took the time to write some notes that helped me a lot in my search for these Lagasse descendants.

I just want to say how deeply appreciative I am of Lionel taking the time to send me that picture and also this one of Dennis Lagasse II, my great-grandfather, with two of his grandchildren, little Harvey and Mary.

One more thing … Lionel does not know.

I just made him an honorary member of…

 

Amelia

Post No. 301.

I was sure you would be coming back for more…

I know who these ordinary people are.

With  this picture and Fran’s help we have finally solved a mystery.

This is Alice  Alexandre with her husband Albert Choinière, and  her sister Amelia Alexandre with her boyfriend Ernest Sorel.

Amelia would marry Ernest a year later in 1915. This picture was scanned last year by Robin. We did not know who they were then.

1915

I have another picture to show you.

Sylvia Bleau, Agnes Alexandre’s daughter, Louis Combe, her husband, her little daughter Sylvia, and… someone identified as aunt Mary.

Here the caption says Mary Alexander, but it’s Amelia again with her husband Ernest Sorel.  She does not look a bit like the real Mary Alexander seen here with her sister Agnes Alexandre in 1922…

Agnes is with her three grandchildren, Louis Jr., Lawrence, and Sylvia Marie. 

In 1922 little did these people know that Agnes would died in 1927.

You already have read the obituary Fran sent me last week didn’t you?

Now every piece of the puzzle falls into place thanks to Fran who is now a full-fledged member of the A-Team.

Caroline’s Daughters

Post No. 300.

Coming back for more…

I hope I did not keep you waiting…

These two beautiful young women are Caroline Ménard’s daughters.

1 June, 1914

It’s Alice Alexandre’s wedding picture. Her sister Amelia is the bridesmaid.

Nothing extraordinary about that, unless you take a closer look at Alice’s and Amelia’s features. Amelia looks a little bit like her father Jean-Baptiste Alexandre.

This is Jean-Baptiste Alexandre known as young man 1 back in  2010.

This is a younger Jean-Baptiste.

This picture was sent by someone a few months ago because he had recognized this next picture Robin had scanned.

He also had this older Jean-Baptiste Alexandre’s portrait.

I figure that Alice looks a lot like her mother Caroline Ménard.

Alice  Alexandre

Nothing extraordinary about that, unless you know that Caroline Ménard died when she gave birth to her 8th child in 1895. She was 32. Amelia was born in 1894 and was the 7th child and Alice was born in 1892 and was the 6th.

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre would remarried with Odila Courchesne and fathered 10 more children.

Quite a time travel since 2010! 

When Fran, Alice’s grandchild, told me she had a wedding picture, I first thought there would be a lot of people on it like this picture I have in my collection about another unrelated family.

April 14, 1909

Wrong!

There were only four. But that’s okay because now we know how Caroline Ménard looked like.

Fran told me she did not know who the groomman was.

The face looked very familiar…

I think I found out who he was.

This picture is one of the 100 pictures Robin scanned last year.

1915

Looks familiar?

I know you will come back for more.

Somewhere in Time

I really enjoyed that movie in 1980.

Click here to know what I am talking about.

I am like a time traveler when I see old pictures. This is why I was stunned to find a site about cabinet cards.

Here’s one old picture for the Gipper

Another one…

Just ordinary people until you can put a name on a smiling face.

Intrigued?

Come back next time.

Agnes Alexandre

Agnes Alexandre is not a mystery woman.

But she was back in 2007 when I began searching for my Lagacé ancestors and all those who were related to them.

Agnes in fact did not even existed.

The Alexandre family was related to me in two ways. This is why I found Agnes along the way. Her mother was my great-grandaunt Philomène Lagacé who had married Jean-Baptiste Alexandre. My great-grandmother Henriette Alexandre was Jean-Baptiste’s sister. 

So when Fran found an obituary last month and wrote this comment, I just had to write something about it.

“This is an obituary in the May 31, 1927 (p.5c.4) issue of The Bristol Press…:”

“MRS. DAVID BLEAU

Mrs. Agnes Bleau, aged 56 years, wife of David Bleau, motorman for The Bristol and Plainville Electric Company, died this morning at her home in Wolcott, following an illness since Friday. She had not enjoyed good health for the past several months.
The funeral will take place at St. Ann’s Church at 8 o’clock Thursday morning, Rev. J. P. Perreault will celebrate the requiem. Interment, in charge of Undertaker James J. Dunn, will be in the new St. Joseph’s Cemetery.
Mrs. Bleau was born in Stanbridge, Canada, fifty-six years ago, daughter of John and Libbie Alexander. Her early life was spent in her native place. She came to this country as a young girl and was married at Blackinton, Mass., in November 1891. She moved to this city with her family fourteen years ago, and for the past five years had been living on the farm in Wolcott, just over the Bristol line.

She is survived by her husband; one daughter, Mrs. Sylvia Combe: one son, Harry Bleau, of this city: two sisters, Miss Mary Alexander, of this city and Mrs. Myra Archambeault of Plainville: three brothers, John B. David Alexander of Plainville and Peter Alexander of this city: and six grandchildren.”

Now if we put with this obituary some pictures we have in our collection… most coming from Robin on the West Coast.

“MRS. DAVID BLEAU

Mrs. Agnes Bleau, aged 56 years, wife of David Bleau, motorman for The Bristol and Plainville Electric Company,

 

David Bleau as a young man

died this morning at her home in Wolcott, following an illness since Friday. She had not enjoyed good health for the past several months.

Agnes Alexandre as a young woman

The funeral will take place at St. Ann’s Church at 8 o’clock Thursday morning, Rev. J. P. Perreault will celebrate the requiem. Interment, in charge of Undertaker James J. Dunn, will be in the new St. Joseph’s Cemetery.

Mrs. Bleau was born in Stanbridge, Canada, fifty-six years ago, daughter of John and Libbie Alexander.

Her early life was spent in her native place.

She came to this country as a young girl and was married at Blackinton, Mass., in November 1891. She moved to this city with her family fourteen years ago, and for the past five years had been living on the farm in Wolcott, just over the Bristol line.

She is survived by her husband; one daughter, Mrs. Sylvia Combe:

 

Sylvia Bleau Combe

one son, Harry Bleau, of this city:

 

Harry on the right

two sisters, Miss Mary Alexander, of this city

 

Mary Alexander on the left in the back

and Mrs. Myra Archambeault of Plainville:

 

Myra Alexandre Archambeault

three brothers, John B.

 

Jean-Baptiste Alexandre

David Alexander of Plainville and Peter Alexander of this city:

David or Peter

and six grandchildren.

 Click on the image to see the grandchildren

Mystery wowen

Welcome back… I hope you have visited this blog a few times. 

Back to this blog, Robin, a member of the A-Team, said in her comment she posted…

What a challenge! Are we up to it?

I answered back…

We won’t know until we try.

You never thought how addictive cabinet cards were didn’t you?

They become more addictive when you can put a name on someone’s face.

Mother and daughter? That’s for sure, but no names, just the photographer’s name.

B. F. Ogden, from Springfield, Massachusetts.

That the only clue unless my cousin Sandy takes a look at the women’s clothing and tells me when it was in style.

Another one. Again from Springfield, Massachusetts.

I sent all the 31 pictures to Sandy. She wanted to take a look. I am sure she will get hooked and give me some clues on when the pictures were taken just by looking at the women’s clothing.

See you around. Until then, subscribe to the other blog about cabinet cards.

You could find your ancestors.

I’m sure that the man featured in this photo is my great great grandfather Per Ambjorn Sparre. He was an inventor amongst other things and actually created the first perforated postage stamps in Stockholm. He married an Italian woman and spent much of his life in Paris. There is a wealth of information about him in Swedish. He was Louis Sparre’s (My great grandfather) father. It was a pleasure seeing this photo for me! I have a painting that looks exactly the same.

Where do I start…? Well in good old Holyoke of course!

Ed sent me this message along with his 31 pictures of unidentied ancestors.

After our little discussion of the Alexander family and from what little research I have done, I believe I have some old photographs that might be from their family.  When my aunt died in 1963, her mother, my grandmother, brought back to Georgia a steamer trunk containing some of my aunt’s things.  In that trunk was a group of old photographs.  They were in my grandmother’s things in 1975 when she died and they have finally come to rest with me. 

No one was ever able to tell me anything about the pictures (I never even thought to ask Uncle George).  They are of babies, children, families, and individual men and women, all dating to the late 1800s and early 1900s. 

None have any names indicating whom the pictures are of, however some do have photographer’s marks.  There are 31 photographs and 16 have Holyoke, Massachusetts labels, 2 have Quebec labels, and 1 has a label from Bristol, Connecticut.  These are all places associated with the Alexanders.  In 1920 and 1930, Jean-Baptiste and his family were living in Bristol, CT; in 1910, they were in Holyoke, MA and prior to that, they were in Quebec.   

All of Ed’s 31 pictures do not ring a bell at all when I look at them closely, so, in point of fact, this should ring a bell.

Could these people be related in some way to the Courchesnes. Odila Courchesne (Courchaine) was George Alexander’s mother? 

None of these people has any facial ressemblance with the Alexanders I have pictures of.

And I do have a lot!

So let’s go full speed ahead with the three family pictures Ed sent and let’s try to find some clues. This will be quite a fascinating journey into the unknown.

Family 1

This is Family 1, for now that is. A man, a woman and a young lady. Daughter, mother and father? Most probably.

I don’t have a faintess clue how they are related to the Alexanders. Also nothing on the Internet about Welcome & Covey photographers. They seemed to have been established in 1894. So this picture is taken in or after 1894 in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

That’s not a lot to go on.

In my search, I found that this picture is called a cabinet card. I like to learn new things. It must be evident if you have been reading this blog from the start.

Now let’s turn our attention to Family 2.

Family 2

Again Welcome & Covey… 1894… 175 High St., Holyoke, Mass.

My 3rd cousin told me once that very youngs boys were dressed like girls in those days. So the girl could be a boy with his father and mother. Notice that the little boy puts his hand on his father’s shoulder.

Still no clue though, but I am sure you would like to put on name on these faces.

Last family picture…

Family 3

New photographer!

I found information about B. F. Ogden on this site, the same one I found the information about cabinet cards

WHAT IS A CABINET CARD?

Welcome to the Cabinet Card Gallery. Cabinet card photographs were first introduced in 1866. They were initially employed for landscapes rather than portraitures. Cabinet cards replaced Carte de visite photographs as the popular mode of photography.  Cabinet cards became the standard for photographic portraits in 1870. Cabinet cards experienced their peak in popularity in the 1880′s.  Cabinet cards were still being produced in the United States until the early 1900′s and continued to be produced in Europe even longer. The best way to describe a cabinet card is that it is a thin photograph that is mounted on a card that measures 4 1/4″ by 6 1/2″. Cabinet cards frequently have artistic logos and information on the bottom or the reverse of the card which advertised the photographer or the photography studio’s services. Enjoy your visit.

Fascinating site!

Getting back to Ed’s cabinet cards, I have no idea who this family is.

This could take years you know…, but I am patient like Ed.

Next time women’s pictures if you’re still interested.

As a footnote to all this, click here.

I will be back on Monday.